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Relationship Between Perceived Clothing Comfort and Exam Performance

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Abstract

Recent controlled laboratory studies have shown an effect of clothing comfort on cognitive performance. To test this relationship under naturalistic conditions, student scores on statistics exams were compared with comfort ratings. Prior to the exam, students rated their confidence in taking the exam, number of hours studied, comfort level, type of clothes being worn, and other relevant variables. To maintain naturalistic conditions, clothing was not manipulated but was self-selected. Controlling for other variables associated with exam performance, multiple regression results indicated a significant positive relationship between comfort ratings and exam scores, with the model explaining 48% of the variance in exam scores R2 = .48). As expected, the more formal the attire, the lower the comfort rating of that attire and the lower the exam score. This study provides further evidence of a relationship between perceived clothing comfort and cognitive performance.
... Posttask clothing perceptions Perceived comfort and awareness of the athletic clothing was assessed because these clothing characteristics have previously been associated with women's focus towards their bodies (Bell et al., 2003(Bell et al., , 2005de Bruin & Oudejans, 2018). An assessment of the similarity of the clothing to the clothing typically worn by participants was also performed to ensure participants were not accustomed to wearing the clothing outside of athletic contexts. ...
... It is interesting that perceived clothing comfort differed between clothing styles, but was not associated with MT. Perceived clothing (dis)comfort has been previously shown to impair visualmotor RT and cognitive performance by shifting focus away from the task at hand (Bell et al., 2003(Bell et al., , 2005. Here, it is likely that clothing comfort impacted resources for motor execution and motor planning. ...
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The type of clothing worn, revealing versus concealing, can affect the performance of women on cognitive tasks. This difference in performance may arise because of changes in body awareness that may draw cognitive resources from the goal task. The present study investigated the influence of the style of athletic clothing and body awareness on visual-motor performance in women. Participants (women ages 18–35 years) were randomly assigned to wear tight and revealing (TR group, n = 40) or loose and concealing (LC group, n = 40) athletic clothing. All participants completed the same visual-motor aiming task to assess spatiotemporal measures of motor performance. In addition to the clothing, participants were primed to be conscious of their bodies via measurements of height, weight, and waist circumference; photographs taken of their bodies; a computerized body-size distortion task; and a mirror in the testing chamber. Results revealed that the TR group had increased movement time variability and did not show performance improvements relative to the LC group. These differences suggest that style of clothing may influence motor performance in women by reallocating cognitive resources towards the body and away from the motor task at hand. This research highlights the interactions between cognitive and motor processes and, potentially, the importance of considering the impact of clothing on performance in many different contexts.
... There is a growing body of evidence exploring the relationship between physical exertion and cognition 14-16 29 ; however, few studies have considered discomfort. 30 In the current study, the participants experienced difficulties completing the cognitive tests as it was uncomfortable for them to lift their head to look up at Original research the projector screen in some load configurations. This discomfort caused some participants to withdraw from the exercise test altogether, while others withdrew from the cognitive tests but continued marching. ...
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... Lee, et al. [22] analyzed IEQ in air conditioned university classrooms in Hong Kong against self-reported learning performance, where respondents used a percentage value to best describe their own performance in four learningrelated activities: calculating, reading, understanding and typing. Bell, et al. [23] examined the relationship between clothing comfort and cognitive performance; student test scores were compared against comfort ratings in a single class. While these studies suggested a relationship between perceived comfort and academic achievement, there is little information available about how environmental parameters influence both sensations of thermal discomfort and student performance. ...
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This paper presents preliminary data on a series of building comfort experiments conducted in the field. We performed physical in-situ measurements and solicited responses from 409 (184 female; 225 male) university students in six different classrooms at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst during three seasons (fall, winter and spring). Our questions focused on student perception of comfort in varied environmental (temperature and humidity, and air speed) conditions. We collected records of student academic performance in the classes, correlating their comfort perceptions to their test scores. Statistical analysis of classroom environmental variables, thermal satisfaction, and student scores suggest that by enhancing thermal comfort, we can improve academic performance.
... Clothing comfort is rated among its most important attributes [57,32]. Bell et al. [3] reported that clothing comfort rating was associated with performance on a cognitive exam. ...
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This paper discusses a new approach being developed for modeling the dynamic behaviour of Vitruvius theory in apparel surfaces. This work extends the fashion design static draping model and includes dynamics, and extends constrained dynamics simulation techniques to yield performance enhancements. The new approach includes several steps. First step is set up the 3D garment of Vitruvius theory by using the method developed in this paper, based on the relationship, the algorithms and generation of rules for transferring style requirements to the parameter values of the fashion design of Vitruvius theory are developed. As such, the knowledge base can be constructed, and the intelligent design system of the 3D garment style is built, simulation remains a major challenge, even if applications are numerous, from rapid prototyping to e-commerce. A stable, real-time algorithm for animating Vitruvius theory apparel surfaces is developed.
... Clothing properties and its model and materials affect perceived comfort and mental and cognitive performance (Bell et al., 2005). Sore studies are performed concerning effects of heat stress and fit on perception of clothing comfort and cognitive performance (Brooks and Parsons, 1999;Hancock and Vasmatzidis, 2003), but a limited number of studies is carried out concerning direct relationship between clothing comfort and cognitive performance. ...
... Helmets are known to cause discomfort (Section 2.3.1). Thermal discomfort, caused by clothing or a warm environment, has been linked to degraded cognitive performance (Bell et al., 2005(Bell et al., , 2003Flouris et al., 2007;Gaoua et al., 2012). This motivated several groups to investigate the relationship between helmet-wearing and cognitive performance. ...
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