Article

The Value of Organizational Reputation in the Recruitment Context: A Brand‐Equity Perspective

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Abstract

We extend the recruitment literature by examining how and why firms’ reputations affect job seekers, and by expanding the outcome variables that can be used to judge recruitment success. Results from 339 individuals suggested that job seekers’ reputation perceptions affected job pursuit because (a) individuals use reputation as a signal about job attributes, and (b) reputation affects the pride that individuals expect from organizational membership. Moreover, individuals were willing to pay a premium in the form of lower wages to join firms with positive reputations, and individuals’ familiarity with organizations affected the amount of information they could recall about a recruitment job posting after 1 week. Finally, the results suggested that reputation advertising did not affect job seekers’ reputation perceptions, suggesting that past research on fictitious companies may not generalize to actual organizations.

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... It is crucial for start-ups to build a reputation that helps attract the needed talent. From a brand equity perspective, job seekers are "willing to pay a premium in the form of lower salaries to work for firms with positive reputations" (Cable & Turban, 2003, p. 2245. Cable and Turban (2003) found that corporate reputation affects job seekers' perceptions and job pursuit intentions. ...
... From a brand equity perspective, job seekers are "willing to pay a premium in the form of lower salaries to work for firms with positive reputations" (Cable & Turban, 2003, p. 2245. Cable and Turban (2003) found that corporate reputation affects job seekers' perceptions and job pursuit intentions. Job seekers value the pride they would get from membership in organizations with good reputations. ...
... Therefore, employees' evaluation of their organization is crucial in building an internal reputation, which in turn affects external reputation among external stakeholders, especially job seekers. In the past, it was difficult for job seekers to find information about the job as well as about the organization (Rynes, 1991 as cited in Cable & Turban, 2003). It is now common practice for job seekers to check an organization's reputation via multiple channels, including de-identified social media platforms where they can read and learn from the current and previous employees' experiences and evaluations. ...
Article
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To provide insights into start-ups’ reputation management, this study aims to explore how employees of a start-up, being, in a broad sense, an entrepreneurial firm, evaluate their employer on an employer review platform. Specifically, it compares the reputational opportunities and challenges of TikTok as a start-up and Snapchat as a more established company in the same industry. It explores the cognitive and evaluative representations employees associate with their employers in reviews. To do this, a total of 644 English-language employee reviews were collected from Glassdoor, an employer review platform on which former and current employees anonymously post reviews about their organizations. Content analysis was then conducted, unveiling 14 thematic topics. The top three most frequently mentioned topics were work environment, co-workers, and salaries and benefits. A comparison of the two companies showed that TikTok received a proportionately higher number of positive reviews about career progression opportunities, work environment, and office and location. However, it also received proportionately more negative reviews on work arrangements, salaries and benefits, and intrinsic rewards. Theoretical and empirical implications are discussed.
... Organizational reputation may be seen as an important resource of social identity (Carmeli and Tishler, 2005). Typically, affiliation with a reputable organization improves one's social standing among friends and other socil circles (Yu and Davis, 2019), enhancing an employee's self-conceptualization (Cable and Turban, 2003), and making her or him feel proud and motivated. An employee's association with a reputable organization may augment individual feelings of pride (Cable and Turban, 2003), hence enhancing organizational attractiveness. ...
... Typically, affiliation with a reputable organization improves one's social standing among friends and other socil circles (Yu and Davis, 2019), enhancing an employee's self-conceptualization (Cable and Turban, 2003), and making her or him feel proud and motivated. An employee's association with a reputable organization may augment individual feelings of pride (Cable and Turban, 2003), hence enhancing organizational attractiveness. Therefore, we posit: H7. ...
... Employees' association with a reputable organization result in feelings of prestige and pride (Cable and Turban, 2003). Association with a reputable organization improves social standing among friends and other social circles (Yu and Davis, 2019), enhancing employee's self-conceptualization (Cable and Turban, 2003;Tajfel and Turner, 1986). ...
Article
This study investigates the link between green human resource management and organizational attractiveness for current employees. For this purpose, we collected temporally separated (four time intervals, two months apart) field data from 322 employees working in the hospitality sector to test the hypothesized relationships. Data were analyzed through structural equation modeling technique by using Smart PLS 3.0 software. The results suggest that green human resource management practices positively affect organizational attractiveness. Specifically, we found that green HRM exerts strong effect over organizational attractiveness, environmental performance, organizational reputation, and green culture. Mediating roles of environmental performance and organizational reputation were found statistically significant. Moreover, environmental performance and organizational reputation sequential mediate the direct relationship between green HRM and organizational attractiveness. However, we did not find any support for the moderation relationship. The study strengthens the assertions of social identity theory and also offers implications for future research and practice.
... Employer reputation is the perception of its values and activities by its major stakeholders, and indicates the status of an organization's name and brand relative to competing organizations and adds value to a job beyond the attributes of the job itself (e.g., work content, pay) [30]. From the job applicants' perspective, employer reputation refers to job applicants' overall evaluation and perception of an organization as a potential employer [28]. ...
... Until recently, a growing body of literature discusses the role of employer reputation in job applicant attraction [28,31]. The research states that employer reputation is more strongly related to job application decisions than is general reputation [30] and an organization with a favorable employer reputation is more attractive to the higher-quality applicants than those with a negative employer reputation [27,28,33]. ...
... Although numerous studies have shown the positive role of CSR practices in the employer's reputation, fewer frameworks are applying the link of CSR with employer reputation in the recruitment field. CSR activities are a function of organizational signals of value [12,27], which are crucial cues for job seekers to evaluate prospective employer reputation [5,7,30,33]. According to social identity theory, CSR activities disclosure to the public benefits job seekers, allowing them to evaluate the employer's reputation, which may have spillover effects on an individual's perceived social status and identity [33]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Based on the social identity theory, this study investigates the mediation and moderation mechanism of CSR on job applicant attraction. A total of 395 job seekers are recruited to join in the experiment survey. The results indicate that job seekers’ perceptions of CSR positively relate to job applicant attraction, employer reputation and expected pride mediate this relationship, respectively, and the serial mediating role of employer reputation and then expected pride in the relationship between CSR and job applicant attraction. Additionally, the findings show that job applicants’ materialism orientation plays a moderating role in the indirect effect of CSR on job applicant attraction via expected pride, but the moderating effect of job seekers’ materialism orientation in the indirect effect of CSR on job applicant attraction via employer reputation is not statistically significant. These findings enrich the new culture-driven evidence on the impacting mechanism of CSR on job applicant’s attitude and provide valuable insight into how CSR motivates job applicant attraction.
... Le concept de marque employeur trouve ses fondements théoriques en marketing avec l'adaptation du modèle de capital marque (Keller & Lehmann, 2006) ce qui conduit à parler de théorie du capital de marque employeur (Cable & Turban, 2003;Theurer et al., 2018;Tumasjan et al., 2020). Les travaux reprennent, en particulier, la distinction entre les concepts d'identité et d'image de marque (Kapferer, 1997). ...
... L'identité de marque employeur renvoie à un concept d'émission et correspond à la façon dont une organisation souhaite se présenter en tant qu'employeur auprès de ses cibles Ressources Humaines -candidats potentiels et salariés actuels (construction de l'entreprise). Pour sa part, l'image de marque employeur constitue une perception en ce qu'elle est définie comme les croyances et les associations des individus vis-à-vis d'une entreprise en tant qu'employeur (Cable & Turban, 2003). Viot et Benraïss-Noailles, (2014) précisent ainsi que la marque employeur permet de créer une identité et une image distinctive de l'organisation en tant qu'employeur conduisant à parler de « promesse d'emploi unique » (App et al., 2012;Ewing et al., 2002). ...
... De manière plus précise, l'image de marque employeur recouvre plusieurs images (Knox & Freeman, 2006;Lievens et al., 2007) : l'image interne, perçue par les employés actuels ; l'image externe, perçue par les employés potentiels ; l'image externe interprétée qui correspond à l'idée que les salariés actuels se font de l'image perçue par les personnes extérieures à l'entreprise. Notons que, si les travaux sur la marque employeur évoquent le concept de capital de marque employeur en prenant, là encore, comme référence, la littérature en marketing (Aaker, 1991;Keller, 1993), les mesures proposées pour l'évaluer se limitent la plupart du temps à la prise en considération de l'image et n'intègrent pas la notoriété, pourtant au coeur du concept (Backhaus & Tikoo, 2004;Cable & Turban, 2003;Collins & Stevens, 2002). ...
Article
The employer brand concept refers to the set of benefits that define a company as an employer and identify what makes it desirable and different from other employers in attracting and retaining human resources. This research focuses on the analysis of the employer brand of the Big Four (Deloitte, EY, KPMG, PwC). These four large audit and consulting firms need to attract new employees every year, most of them young graduates from “Grandes Ecoles” and universities. This research questions and analyzes the ability of these four companies to define a differentiated employer brand in order to attract potential human resources. Based on the analysis of the Big Four recruitment websites and a questionnaire survey conducted with accounting / finance students, this research offers a comparative analysis of the employer brand identity and image of the Big Four. It emerges that if the four firms try to differentiate themselves when they communicate their employer brand identity on their recruitment website in terms of valued benefits, these differentiating elements are only marginally perceived by potential human resources who have a poorly differentiated image of the employer brand benefits of these four companies. This research thus revels an unprecedented archetypal situation where the promotion of a unique employee value proposition constitutes a real challenge for employer branding insofar as it relates more to the common image of the Big Four as a group of companies than those of the companies themselves.
... Additionally, employer branding is used to increase employer attractiveness and enhance company reputation (Sivertzen et al., 2013). Job seekers often consider several organizations when they apply for the job, and they can use organizational reputation as a source of information about working conditions in various organizations (Cable and Turban, 2003). According to Walsh and Beatty (2007), organizational reputation is considered one of the intangible and valuable resources that can contribute to achieving competitive advantage and is one of the important things job seekers consider when applying for a job. ...
... Few study consider organizational reputation as mediator (Ehsan and Nurfitri, 2021). This study tried to fill this void, because, nowadays, organizational reputation is important, especially because of the development of social media (Cable and Turban, 2003;Collins and Stevens, 2002;Erlinda and Safitri, 2020;Liu, 2018;Xie et al., 2015). This study was among the first empirical attempts to examine the role of organizational reputation in mediating the effect of employer brand attractiveness on intention to apply through data obtained from Indonesia's fresh graduate students. ...
... Several studies showed that one of the main determinants in recruiting talent is the organization's reputation, referring to the organization's status to other organizations (Belt and Paolillo, 1982;Cable and Turban, 2003). This study showed that an organization with a positive reputation is more attractive to job seekers. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to examine the role of organizational reputation in mediating the influence of employer brand attractiveness on intention to apply. Organizational reputation has an essential role in attracting potential talent to apply for an organization, as organizational reputation is an intangible and valuable resource to gain the competitive advantage that shows the working atmosphere in the organization. The study investigated organizational reputation as a mediating variable on the relationship between employer brand attractiveness as an independent variable and intention to apply as a dependent variable. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire that was distributed to 425 respondents. Respondents for this study were final-grade students from public universities in Indonesia. The path analysis technique was used to analyse the data. The result shows that employer attractiveness significantly influences the intention to apply. The result also reveals that employer brand attractiveness significantly affects the organizational reputation. Meanwhile, organizational reputation does not influence the intention to apply. Therefore, organizational reputation does not mediate the influence of employer brand attractiveness on the intention to apply. From this study, organizations can learn how to design programs that can improve employer brand attractiveness, particularly among gen millennials.
... Crafting differentiation is vital in shaping employer brand image, which in turn affects the appeal and attractiveness and ultimately, the brand. In order to attract job seekers, organizations have to work on employer attractiveness in order to set their brand apart (Cable and Turban, 2003). Attractiveness is defined as a dimension of employer brand (Moroko and Uncles, 2008). ...
... It can be considered a "brand," which gives value to a job beyond the typical job characteristics themselves (e.g. work details, compensation) (Cable and Turban, 2003). Organizations strive to attain strong corporate reputation, as it enhances their corporate image, prevents negative perception toward the organization and establishes a positive reputation (Jones, 2005;Lange et al., 2011;Porter and Kramer, 2006). ...
... Halliday and Kuenzel (2008) suggested that positive reputation leads to the creation of a more positive perception toward an organization's brand. Employees tend to feel more pride (Cable and Turban, 2003) being associated with organizations that have positive reputation which goes on to affecting and elevating the employer brand (Bhattacharya and Sen, 2003). While FGC is utilized as a means to enhance the organization's reputation and brand, positive-toned EGC serves to exhibit the pride felt by employees while at the same affecting the employer brand perception. ...
Article
Purpose The aim of this study is to identify the relationship between employee-generated content (EGC) and firm-generated content (FGC) in the form of LinkedIn posts, employer brand perception, and the effect of employer's attractiveness and corporate reputation on this relationship. Design/methodology/approach This study comprises two phases. In phase 1, the focus was on stimuli selection through an online questionnaire on favourability. In phase 2, for the main study, data were gathered through an online survey from 214 information technology (IT) employees via a survey. Multiple linear regression and mediation analyses were conducted. Findings The results show that EGC and FGC have a positive influence on employer brand perception, and the relationship is positively mediated by employer attractiveness and corporate reputation. These findings suggest that organizations can strategically use their own as well as employees' LinkedIn accounts, and encourage employee advocacy initiatives to attract new talent, enhance attractiveness and corporate reputation. Originality/value The study covers two different categories of content – employer and employee-generated – and examines both content types' influence on employer brand perception. It adds to the body of literature regarding employee branding and paves the way for further research in employee advocacy.
... Employees take pride in working for organizations that has a good reputation. And employees' self-esteem is increased by a partnership with a reputable organization (Cable and Turban, 2003). Furthermore, it decreases the likelihood of employees leaving the organization because the organization's reputation enhances the self-image of employees. ...
... 1. Pride: Being part of an organization with a strong reputation encourages pride (Carmeli, 2004). And strengthening the employee-organization bond (Cable and Turban, 2003). Thus, employees who working for an organization regarded as prestigious feel personal pride generated by activities such as the organization's good outcomes. ...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this research is to determine the mediating role of organizational reputation in promoting the impact of employee value proposition on organizational commitment. The approach used in this research was historical, descriptive, and analytical. The research adopted the historical approach to illustrate the concepts addressed, and the descriptive approach to describing the data on the research problem according to the sample answers. Finally, the analytical approach to analyze the data was through statistical tests. The research concludes that there is a significant impact for employee value proposition on organizational commitment, a significant impact for organizational reputation on organizational commitment, and the mediating role of organizational reputation in promoting the impact of employee value proposition on organizational commitment is partial mediation. The results and recommendations of this research assure that employee value proposition and organization reputation is crucial in promoting the commitment of employees. The originality of this research has valuable implications for both theory and practice, as it offers several contributions to literature in the field of study, as well as the practical contribution.
... People seek jobs for various reasons (Koen et al., 2016), which drive them to consider different features, such as potential pay or employer attractiveness, when deciding whether to apply (Jones et al., 2014). For example, company reputation is an important consideration for many people (Cable & Turban, 2003). In the past, companies could largely control information about their reputations, such as by conveying a desired image in their written communications or advertisements (Pernkopf et al., 2020) and engaging in appropriate core activities (e.g., bringing products and service to the market, creating shareholder value). ...
... Because profile reputations primarily reflect job-related information, while corporate reputation achieves greater relevance in environments marked by incomplete information (Lui & Ngo, 2005), we predict a moderating effect of corporate reputation. That is, corporate reputation might function as an additional, less salient signal for job seekers, which they can use to complement any incomplete information about working conditions (Cable & Turban, 2003). When job seekers find information on company review sites, they process those signals according to the information they already have about a company (i.e., corporate reputation). ...
Article
Companies searching for talent face intense competition in labor markets, so they might attempt to use their reputations to attract qualified people. Today’s job seekers can gather additional reputational cues from online profiles on rating platforms, as well as from general information. Therefore, companies might have multiple reputations. Their profile reputation reflects cues provided by rating platforms (e.g., numerical ratings); their corporate reputation refers to preexisting perceptions and general knowledge of the firm. To the extent that a company’s profile reputation and corporate reputation exist in parallel, they likely interact to affect job seekers’ application intentions. With preliminary insights gained from qualitative interviews and extensive pretests, the authors conduct an online experiment with 725 job seekers to determine how company profiles on employer review sites might exert signaling effects on job seekers’ application intentions. In line with the theoretical predictions, a company’s profile reputation affects application intentions, contingent on applicants’ prior evaluation of the firm’s corporate reputation. That is, the employer’s profile reputation matters for attracting talent, but companies with a poor general corporate reputation also can benefit more from a good profile reputation. These nuanced insights in turn offer several implications for human resource management efforts.
... La ME améliore l'attractivité de l'entreprise (Klimkiewicz et Oltra, 2017 ;Jones et al., 2014) ; elle augmente le nombre et la qualité de candidatures reçues, la probabilité́ que le poste soit pourvu ainsi que celle de figurer dans l'ensemble de considération des salariés potentiels et réduit la durée nécessaire pour pourvoir un poste (Knox et Freeman, 2006 ;Martin, 2009 ;Kapoor, 2010 ;Ong, 2011 ;Shahzad et al., 2011). La ME est également bénéfique pour l'organisation dont la performance financière est supérieure du fait de la réduction des coûts liés au turnover, de prétentions salariales moindres (Cable et Turban, 2003 ;Tavassoli et al., 2014) et d'une productivité accrue des salariés (Fulmer et al., 2003 ;Mandhanya et Shah, 2010 ;Love et Singh, 2011 ;Tulasi et Hanumantha, 2012). Cependant, les recherches portant sur l'effet d'une fausse promesse (ou d'une surpromesse) sont plus rares et centrées principalement sur le manque de sincérité des engagements RSE intégrés à la promesse ME et sur le décalage entre le discours prôné et les pratiques réelles. ...
... Autrement dit, ils accepteraient des salaires plus bas (plus haut) pour travailler dans une entreprise bénéficiant d'une image éthique (non-éthique). Pour Cable et Turban (2003), les candidats potentiels seraient enclins à̀ faire des concessions sur leur salaire si l'employeur bénéficie d'une bonne réputation. Les entreprises souffrant d'un déficit de réputation pourraient ainsi tirer profit de l'arbitrage que certains salariés potentiels sont prêts à envisager. ...
Chapter
La littérature soulignant les effets désirables et bénéfiques de la marque employeur sur les salariés actuels et potentiels est très abondante. A l'inverse, celle qui traite de ses effets indésirables (en cas de surpromesse ou de fausse promesse) est plus limitée et est souvent de nature conceptuelle. Ce chapitre met en lumière les conséquences pour les entreprises qui seraient tentées de présenter une version embellie de la réalité de l'expérience d'emploi et une promesse marque employeur et/ou RSE enjolivées. Cette forme de « greenwashing » appliqué à la marque employeur, très peu traitée dans la littérature, pourrait avoir pour conséquence de favoriser des comportements de retrait des salariés actuels (démotivation, absentéisme, baisse de production, intention de quitter, etc.) et la déception de salariés récemment recrutés. Ce chapitre se propose d'analyser ce côté obscur de la promesse marque employeur. Plus précisément, il s'interroge d'une part sur l'essence même de la promesse d'emploi, les interactions de la marque employeur avec les autres marques (produit/service et corporate), et sur ses effets sur les salariés en poste ou potentiels. A la fin de ce chapitre, un agenda de recherche sera proposé. Les pistes de recherches qui seront suggérées mettront en lumière la part sombre de la marque employeur restée inexplorée ainsi que ses effets aussi bien sur les salariés actuels que potentiels.
... The contemporary academic debates also state the presence of overall heterogeneous theoretical approaches in employer branding (Edlinger, 2015;Theurer et al., 2018), containing pure marketing frameworks such as 'brand equity' (Cable & Turban, 2003;Knox & Freeman, 2006), perspectives from new institutional economics such as 'signalling theory' (Myrden & Kelloway, 2015) and the wide range of theories from social psychology such as 'social identity' (Lievens et al., 2007;Martin & Hetrick, 2006) or 'instrumental-symbolic framework' (Lievens & Highhouse, 2003;Rampl & Kenning, 2014). Social identity theory in general (Ashforth & Mael, 1989;Turner, 1975) and 'instrumental-symbolic framework' in particular (Highhouse et al., 2007) explain the idea that employees define themselves in terms of the organization where they work. ...
... This becomes a source of long-term competitive advantages. As seen from the definition, the EBO concept is based on the employer brand equity theory (Cable & Turban, 2003). Employer brand equity theory follows the broader product brand equity approach from marketing (Aaker, 1991;Keller, 1993) that defines the brand equity as the value attributed to a products with similar features based on the name and perceptions of that product (Collins & Kanar, 2014). ...
... Connection with a reputable enterprise increases employees' self-esteem (Cable & Turban, 2003;Riordan et al., 1997); thus generating both a call for participation for the new employees and vested interest for the existing ones. Gatewood, Gowan and Lautenschlager (1993) found that overall reputation, familiarity with the enterprise, getting acquainted with someone working in the enterprise, exposure to advertisements, and using the enterprise's products or services were associated with the corporate images of the enterprise. ...
... According to Fieldman (2009), the influence of the HR function on corporate reputation has been studied occasionally. Noteworthy exceptions include (Clardy, 2005;Turban & Cable, 2003) some studies indicating that employee layoffs reduced corporate reputation (Flanagan & O Shaughnessy, 2005) and fair treatment of HR improved corporate reputation (Koys, 1997). ...
Chapter
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Corporate reputation, which has been considered by various researchers in recent years, especially within the scope of strategic management literature, along with the impact of globalization and rising competition, attracts attention as intangible assets that maintain a sustainable competitive advantage for enterprises. Corporate reputation is conceptualized as “the set of perceptions acquired by individuals inside and outside a company” (Fombrun, 1996). The reputation of an enterprise is comprised of the perceptions of pertinent stakeholders such as employees, customers, suppliers, strategic partners, owners, society and community, government and non-governmental organizations. An enhanced corporate reputation is perceived as an intangible asset as well as a strategic advantage source that fosters enterprises’ ability to generate long-term value (Caves & Porter, 1977). Basically, corporate reputation consists of both economic and noneconomic unique capabilities of an enterprise (Fombrum, 1996). Corporate reputation involves an intangible but crucial factor affecting the behaviors of stakeholders including employees, managers, customers, and investors.
... Three items from Cable and Turban (2003) were used to measure expected pride from organizational membership. Sample items included "I would feel proud to tell others that I work for this firm" and "I would feel proud to be an employee of this firm" (preintervention α = 0.96; postintervention α = 0.96). ...
... Participants' job pursuit intentions were measured using five items adapted from Aiman-Smith et al. (2001) and Cable and Turban (2003). The response was on a 7-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 7 = strongly agree). ...
Article
Despite the recognition of the importance of organizational reputation, our understanding of how organizations can overcome an unfavorable reputation to achieve recruitment success is incomplete. Drawing from social identity theory, the reputation repair literature, and signaling theory, we investigated the influence of two recruitment messages (serving the public's interest and employee development opportunities) on job seekers' job pursuit intentions for organizations operating in a negative reputation industry. To do so, we conducted two online experiments – one using a fictitious context and student job seekers and the other using actual companies and more experienced job seekers. The results show that recruitment messages focused on serving the public's interests enhanced employer reputation and job seekers' expected pride from organizational membership, and recruitment messages focused on employee development opportunities enhanced employer reputation and job seekers' expected organization-based self-esteem. The effects of the recruitment messages on job pursuit intentions were mediated by enhanced employer reputation, expected pride from organizational membership, and expected organization-based self-esteem. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
... Job seekers often consider multiple organisations when they intend to apply for a job and may use corporate reputation as a source of information regarding working conditions in different organisations (Cable and Turban, 2003). According to Weigelt and Camerer (1988), reputation is the set of organisational' characteristics socially constructed and based on organisations' previous actions. ...
... According to Sivertzen et al. (2013), corporate reputation has a positive relationship with the intention to apply for a job. Therefore, an organisation with a positive level of corporate reputation makes it more attractive in the market (Cable and Turban, 2003). In sum, employer branding and corporate reputation are key elements in attracting and retaining the best employees (Cappelli, 2001). ...
Article
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Purpose Employer branding is a topic that has gained relevance in the organisational world. Currently, organisations need to differentiate themselves, and one of their biggest challenges is the search and retention of talent. One of the factors that have been associated with attracting talent is employer branding. However, studies that explore the relationship between this, corporate reputation and the intention to apply for a job are scarce. As such, this study aims to analyse the mediating role of corporate reputation in the relationship between employer branding and the intention to apply for a job offer. Design/methodology/approach To achieve the goals, data were collected from 225 Portuguese adults. The response rate was 75%. Based on a survey, respondents reported their perceptions of employer branding of a specific organisation, and they rated the organisation’s reputation and their intention to apply to that organisation. Findings The results showed that employer branding (interest value; social value; economic value; development value; application value) positively influenced an organisation’s corporate reputation, which, in turn, increased an individual’s intention to apply for an employment offer in that organisation. Originality/value The present study is a contribution to the literature on employer branding, as it reinforced the importance that employer branding and corporate reputation play in the intention of applying for a job offer.
... When recruiting, a VIO may transmit signals (e.g., text, imagery) through various media (e.g., posters, videos, social media updates) that are designed to catch the attention of prospective volunteers and expand these individuals' knowledge of the organization (Cable & Turban, 2003;Carpentier et al., 2019;Lievens & Highhouse, 2003;Yu & Cable, 2012;Zhu et al., 2021). These signals typically aim to communicate an organization's purpose, values, or mission, the characteristics the organization is seeking from its members, and/or the opportunities the organization will afford to its members. ...
... Other potentially relevant factors for job choice (e.g., salary) are mentioned on the website in all conditions. Following the methodological approach of Jones et al. [18] we use the same scales for measuring anticipated pride [30], perceived value fit [18], expected treatment [18], organizational attractiveness [31], and will derive questions for perceived signal quality from related measures. For analyzing the data, we aim to conduct multiple regression analysis including the examination of mediators and moderator effects as visualized in Figure 1. ...
Conference Paper
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As organizations drive the development and deployment of Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based technologies, their commitment to ethical and humanistic values is critical to minimizing potential risks. Here, we investigate talent attraction as an economic incentive for organizations to commit to ethical AI. Based on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) literature and signaling theory, we present a mixed-methods research design to investigate the effect of ethical AI commitment on organizational attractiveness. Specifically, we i) identify signals of ethical AI commitment based on a review of corporate websites and expert interviews and ii) examine the effect of selected signals on organizational attractiveness in an online experiment. This short paper presents first results on ethical AI signals and details the next steps. Our research will contribute to the theoretical conceptualization of ethical AI as a part of CSR and support managers of digital transformation processes when weighing investments in ethical AI initiatives.
... At a practical level, this increased research interest in organizational image is paralleled by the approach of employer branding (Avery and McKay, 2006;Backhaus and Tikoo, 2004;Cable and Aiman-Smith, 2000;Cable and Turban, 2003;Lievens, 2007a). Employer branding or employer brand management involves promoting, both within and outside the firm, a clear view of what makes a firm different and desirable as an employer. ...
... It would also be worth examining how lack of managerial support can push older employees into early retirement [74]. Future research might use signal theory [104] to understand how older workers or job applicants decode or interpret the information about an organization via various media, including the company website [105]. Our results also show the relevance of using social exchange theory [106] to explore the impact of HR practices and the working climate on the attitudes and behaviors of older employees. ...
Article
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The twin issues of population aging and critical talent shortages induce employers to encourage older workers to prolong their professional lives. Over the past two decades, studies have mainly examined which human resources practices influence older workers’ ability, motivation, and opportunity to continue working. Our conceptual lens rest on self-determination theory (SDT). This study explores how older professionals in the financial services sector may see how three psychological needs (i.e., autonomy, competence, and relatedness) are satisfied or frustrated through various management practices such as monetary rewards, benefits, career development, and work content and context. Our interviews with older finance professionals also show the relevance of a fourth need, beneficence, to understand their decision to continue to work. Results of this study are likely to be significant at both managerial and societal levels in the perspective of sustainable development or employability.
... These findings resonate with research on prevailing negative associations with public employees, culminating in the stereotype of the lazy bureaucrat ( Van de Walle, 2004). Research in HRM provides long-standing evidence that recruitment outcomes are contingent on the public image of organizations (e.g., Cable & Turban, 2003;Lemmink et al., 2003;Lievens & Slaughter, 2016). Particularly in the early stages of recruitment, candidates infer employer attractiveness not only from manifest information about the advertised job but also from more subtle images about the organization itself (Chapman et al., 2005), suggesting that the general image spills over to the image of the same organization as an employer (Younis & Hammad, 2021). ...
Article
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Sector preferences in job choice have rarely been tested empirically across different administrative systems. We address this gap and apply a between-subject experimental design to examine the attractiveness of public, private, and nonprofit employers in two countries in different administrative traditions. Respondents (N = 362) from an Anglo-Saxon (i.e., the U.S.) and continental European country (i.e., Germany) were exposed to job advertisements that only differed in the employer’s sector affiliation, with other job attributes, such as payment and working hours, held constant. Contrary to expectations, and consistently across the two country samples, respondents evaluated public sector jobs more positively compared to vacancies in the private sector. In contrast, we found no such comparative advantage of public over nonprofit employers. By providing counterevidence to the prevalence of negative attitudes toward public organizations, our study warns against overgeneralizing previous findings on negativity biases to the context of employer attractiveness.
... On the other hand, the subjective factor also accounts for job seekers' concerns about the image of the organization. Indeed, they may perceive that joining a reputable organization will help to enhance their personal pride [44]. They will also perform a mapping exercise between their personal characteristics and their perceptions of the organization [45]. ...
... From the perspective of potential employees, employer attractiveness measures are used to predict the organizational pursuits of potential employees . However, as pointed out by Cable and Turban (2003), potential employees lack the experience of working in the target organization yet, and their perceptions might not provide complete and accurate information about the employment experience. This suggests that there is a difference in how organizational actions are perceived by potential and existing employees. ...
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With the growing interest in employer attractiveness, research is unsystematic on how this phenomenon can be conceptualized and studied. Studies tend to make little conceptual differentiation regarding for whom employers should be attractive, and therefore, address the perspectives of potential as well as current employees, who work in organizations for long periods of time. In this study our arguments relate to the phenomenon’s conceptual clarity as well as its differentiation from other related concepts. By focusing on employer attractiveness for current employees, we have systematically reviewed 48 studies published in business and management journals, and categorized findings into the Inputs–Mediators–Outputs model. This approach allowed us to depict significant limitations in the existing knowledge about employer attractiveness from the current employees’ perspective, and offer avenues for future research. Next, to delineate the future research agenda, we have suggested that employer branding in organisations needs to be targeted more toward current employees.
... It would be useful to examine how lack of managerial support can push older employees into early retirement (Karpinska et al., 2013). Future research might use signal theory (Spence, 1978) to understand how older workers or job applicants decode the available information on an organization as a signal of its working conditions (Cable & Turban, 2003). Researchers could also investigate whether older workers or external job applicants perceive the age-related total rewards practices adopted and communicated by employers (via various media, including the company Web site) as a positive work climate signal. ...
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This study extends our knowledge about the management of older employees in the sector of financial services, which faces enormous transformational pressures (e.g., emergence of artificial intelligence, digital services). Based on the black box model of human resource management, we investigate how executives at 16 major financial institutions manage their total rewards to motivate their older professionals to stay at work longer. Top management’s views towards older professionals underlie a firm’s culture or climate, and more precisely, the extent of the perception that they are a strategic resource that needs focused management. Across firms, such adaptation (or lack thereof) is made through the following total rewards components: (1) flexibility in working time and place of work, (2) hiring of retirees, (3) hiring or promotion of older professionals, (4) role adjustment, (5) responsibilities and performance standards, (6) monetary rewards, benefits, and (7) recognition, succession planning, and support for retirement planning or preparation. The black box model should be used in future research to understand which reward components work best in which contextsto motivate older workers to stay at work longer.
... Based on the same brand equity foundation, employer-based brand equity can be defined as the differential effect that employer brand knowledge has on an applicant's response to employer brand management. This effect may be in the form of stronger job pursuit intentions, larger and more qualified applicant pools and even superior organizational performance (Collins and Han, 2004;Cable and Turban, 2003;Fulmer et al., 2003;Gardner et al., 2011;Lievens and Slaughter, 2016). ...
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Purpose-In the past 25 years, employer and internal branding have grown significantly. Prior reviews tended to focus on either one of these domains. This study aims to map the intellectual structure of research on both employer branding and internal branding, thereby identifying impactful authors and journals, current and evolving themes and avenues for future research. Design/methodology/approach-Using VOSviewer and Biblioshiny software packages, a bibliometric analysis of 739 articles was conducted using various methods such as citation analysis, bibliographic coupling, cluster analysis, keyword analysis and three-field plot. The Scopus results were further validated using 297 articles produced by the Web of Science data set. It ensured the robustness of the results and generalizability of the findings across bibliometric data sets. Findings-The findings first report the impactful articles, authors and institutions of employer and internal branding research, along with popular keywords used in this area. Next, the analysis reveals four major clusters and seven subthemes (i.e. employer brand and job seekers, employer brand and employees, employer brand and international human resource management (HRM), third-party employer branding, internal branding-conceptualization/review, internal branding-antecedents and consequences, internal brand management). Early research focused more on "corporate brandings," whereas current research deals more with "employer branding: antecedents and consequences," "employer branding conceptualization/review," and "internal branding" and its subthemes. The employer and internal branding clusters have evolved largely independent from each other. This study offers future research directions and practical implications per cluster. Originality/value-To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first comprehensive bibliometric analysis of both employer and internal branding research.
... Reputation affects behavioural intention because it enhances expectations for successful role performance (Wayne et al., 2007). This effect has been studied in different fields, such as recruitment processes (Cable and Turban, 2003), job intentions (Wayne and Casper, 2012), intention to leave a neighbourhood (Permentier et al., 2009), intentions to repurchase, and word-of-mouth intentions (Su et al., 2016). ...
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The paper examines the role of specific properties of the university ecosystem on the entrepreneurial activity of university students in Costa Rica. We examined the influence of four predictors of entrepreneurial intention, specifically university environment, entrepreneurship education, learning program, and entrepreneurial reputation. The study tested four proposed hypotheses using hierarchical linear regression models on a sample of 4,158 Costa Rican university students drawn from the GUESSS 2018 database. The findings reveal that the skills, abilities, and values that students acquire on university courses, and a recognised entrepreneurial reputation acknowledged by students contribute positively to their entrepreneurial intention. Overall, this study provides further evidence that a university’s environment, entrepreneurship education, learning program, and entrepreneurial reputation all contribute separately to entrepreneurial intention. However, the results differ considerably when taken in combination, whereupon it is a university’s learning program and entrepreneurial reputation that contribute most positively to entrepreneurial intention.
... Ürün ve hizmetlerin marka değeri, sahip olduğu soyut ve somut boyutlar ile üretici kurumlar için oldukça geniş bir çerçevede değerlendirilmektedir. Marka değeri; yatırımcı ve ortaklar ile marka arasındaki ilişkilerdeki belirleyici rolü (Wang & Sengupta, 2016: 5562), pazarda sağladığı rekabet gücü (Motameni ve Shahrokhi, 1998: 290), kurumsal sürdürülebilirlik üzerindeki etkisi (Khan & Manwani, 2013: 269), kurumsal itibar ile yakın ilişkisi (Cable & Turban, 2003: 2266, satış gücü üzerindeki belirleyiciliği (Tuominen, 1999: 73) ve daha pek çok alanda işletme için kritik bir öneme sahiptir. ...
... Een positief imago kan baanzoekers aantrekken omdat zij zichzelf graag identificeren met organisaties met een innovatief imago. Ze associëren dat namelijk met een positieve bijdrage aan hun aanzien en/of sociale status (Cable & Turban, 2003). Er is nog een tweede verklaring waarom imago een belangrijke voorspeller is voor de aantrekkelijkheid van een baan en organisatie. ...
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De doelstelling van dit onderzoek is het vaststellen van de mate waarin de voorkeuren van groepen jonge baanzoekers overeenkomen met de baan- en organisatiekenmerken van de organisaties waar jongeren baanzoekers terecht kunnen komen. We doen dat op de eerste plaats door een meetinstrument te ontwerpen voor de voorkeuren voor baan- en organisatiekenmerken van jonge baanzoekers om vervolgens daarmee hun voorkeuren op een grootschalige manier vast stellen. Op de tweede plaats ontwikkelen we een meetinstrument waarmee gemeten kan worden hoe medewerkers de aspecten die jongeren belangrijk vinden, ervaren in hun werk. We stellen daarmee vast in hoeverre de voorkeuren van jongeren aanwezig zijn in banen en organisaties waar jonge baanzoekers terecht komen. Hoe meer overeenkomsten er zijn tussen de voorkeuren van jonge baanzoekers en kenmerken van organisaties, hoe groter de kans is dat het werk aantrekkelijk wordt gevonden door jonge baanzoekers.
... 2015) who did not find significant effects of negative media on actual consumer behavior, we argue that a person's employer (i.e. brand) represent an important part of the individual's self-concept leading to a change in employee behavior (Cable & Turban, 2003). ...
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Keywords Abstract Negative brand publicity; corporate brand pride; Affective-Events-Theory; internal branding; brand experience; brand supporting behavior This article examines the effects of perceived negative brand publicity on employee emotions, attitudes and brand supporting behaviors. Drawing on Affective-Events-Theory (AET) it attempts to identify underlying affective and cognitive processes leading to be-havioral change. Using data gathered from a large-scale survey of employees in Germany, our results show that perceived negative brand publicity affects emotional and attitudinal corporate brand pride of employees. In addition, higher levels of perceived negative brand publicity were negatively associated with brand-supporting behavior, such as employee referrals and word-of-mouth (WOM). We show that corporate brand experience through internal communications can be an effective tool in mitigating harmful effects of perceived negative brand publicity. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
... Farklı analiz düzeylerinde itibara olan bakış Rindova açısının da farklılaşması durumu, daha fazla araştırmanın da yolunu açmaktadır. Yönetsel anlamda odak noktası olan kurumsal itibar çalışmaları çok fazla izleyicilerin algılarına odaklanırken (Bromley, 1993;Cable ve Turban, 2003;Fulmer, Gerhart ve Scott, 2003;Gatewood, Gowan ve Lautenschlager, 1993;Rindova, Williamson, Petkova ve Sever, 2005;Riordan, Gatewood ve Bill, 1997); son yıllarda yapılan kişisel itibar araştırmaları da artış göstermektedir (Ferris vd., 2003;Hochwarter, Ferris ve Zinko, 2007;Zinko vd., 2007). Ancak kurumsal itibar çalışmaları genel anlamda bireysel farklılıkları dikkate almamaktadır. ...
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İtibar kavramı subjektif bir yapı olmasının beraberinde, algılama yoluyla birey ve firmalara atfettiğimiz değeri içeren ve karar verme mekanizmamızda gömülü olarak yer alan olgudur. Değer atfının öncülü olan tutumlar, davranışlar, inançlar, kültür gibi öğelerin de izlerini taşıyan itibar kavramı, çeşitli disiplinlerce inceleme konusu olmuştur. Liderler veya yöneticiler kişisel itibarlarını kurumları ile bağdaştırmış ya da bağdaştıramamış ve sonucunda paydaşları ile olan ilişkisel ağlarının yapılarını olumlu ya da olumsuz etkilemişlerdir. Bu yönden, kişi itibarının kurum itibarını etkileme durumu tüm değişkenleri ile araştırmalara konu olmaktadır. Faaliyetlerinde kurumsal itibarlarından hareket eden firmalar, kurumsal itibarın öncülleri ve sonuçlarının neler olduğunu ortaya çıkarmayı istemektedir. Kurumsal itibarı oluşturan öncülleri ve kurumsal itibarın yol açtığı birtakım sonuçların araştırılması ve ilgili değişkenlerin iyi yönetilmesi sonucunda firmaların rekabet avantajı sağlayacakları beklenmektedir. Bu çalışmada, tepe yöneticilerinin itibarının kurumsal itibarın bir öncülü olduğu varsayımından hareket ederek, ilgili kavramların ve teorik çerçevenin değerlendirilmesi gerekliliği tartışılmıştır. Bununla birlikte, tepe yöneticisinin itibarının kişisel ve örgüt düzeylerinde farklılaşabildiği; ancak kurumsal itibar çalışmalarında yöneticinin itibarının, kurumsal çerçeve bağlamında incelenmesi gerekliliği vurgulanmıştır. ABSTRACT The concept of reputation has a subjective structure embedded in our decision-making mechanism along with the value we attribute to individuals and companies through perception. Therefore, the concept of reputation has been the subject of study by various disciplines as being embodied the traces of attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and culture, which are the precursors of value attribution. Leaders or managers have affected the structures of their relationship networks positively or negatively as they might have or not associated their personal reputation with their institutions. Personal reputation affecting the organization's reputation is subject to research with all its variables. Companies using corporate reputations in their activities, strategically tend to reveal the premises and results of corporate reputation. It is expected that the companies researching specific results caused by the corporate reputation and managing the relevant variables will provide the competitive advantage as a result of corporate reputation. In the study, the necessity of evaluating the related concepts and theoretical framework is discussed, based on the assumption that the reputation of the top managers/CEOs is a precursor to corporate reputation. However, it is emphasized that the reputation of the top manager/CEO may differ at the personal and organizational levels in corporate reputation literature, authors specifically highlight that the CEO reputation should be examined within the context of the institutional framework.
... Based on the same brand equity foundation, employer-based brand equity can be defined as the differential effect that employer brand knowledge has on an applicant's response to employer brand management. This effect may be in the form of stronger job pursuit intentions, larger and more qualified applicant pools and even superior organizational performance (Collins and Han, 2004;Cable and Turban, 2003;Fulmer et al., 2003;Gardner et al., 2011;Lievens and Slaughter, 2016). ...
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Purpose In the past 25 years, employer and internal branding have grown significantly. Prior reviews tended to focus on either one of these domains. This study aims to map the intellectual structure of research on both employer branding and internal branding, thereby identifying impactful authors and journals, current and evolving themes and avenues for future research. Design/methodology/approach Using VOSviewer and Biblioshiny software packages, a bibliometric analysis of 739 articles was conducted using various methods such as citation analysis, bibliographic coupling, cluster analysis, keyword analysis and three-field plot. The Scopus results were further validated using 297 articles produced by the Web of Science data set. It ensured the robustness of the results and generalizability of the findings across bibliometric data sets. Findings The findings first report the impactful articles, authors and institutions of employer and internal branding research, along with popular keywords used in this area. Next, the analysis reveals four major clusters and seven subthemes (i.e. employer brand and job seekers, employer brand and employees, employer brand and international human resource management (HRM), third-party employer branding, internal branding – conceptualization/review, internal branding – antecedents and consequences, internal brand management). Early research focused more on “corporate brandings,” whereas current research deals more with “employer branding: antecedents and consequences,” “employer branding conceptualization/review,” and “internal branding” and its subthemes. The employer and internal branding clusters have evolved largely independent from each other. This study offers future research directions and practical implications per cluster. Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first comprehensive bibliometric analysis of both employer and internal branding research.
... The OP has been measured using a four-item scale developed by Cable and Turban (2003). Example items include "I am proud to be part of this organization" and "I feel proud to identify myself personally with this organization." ...
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This study examines the micro-level consequences of perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) and hypothesizes that perceived CSR affects the perception-emotion-attitude-behavior sequence. We hypothesized that perceived CSR affects organizational pride (OP) (emotion), affects affective commitment (AC) (attitude), and enhances the employees’ creative behaviors (behavior) by using the lens of appraisal theory of emotion (ATE). This study also hypothesizes that the association of perceived CSR and employee creative behaviors (ECBs) is serially mediated by OP and AC. The time-lagged data were collected from employees of only those companies participating in CSR activities to analyze the sequential mediation effect. We have tested the hypotheses of this study through Hayes approach. Results showed that perceived CSR kindles the employees’ creative behaviors. Furthermore, “organizational pride” and “affective commitment” serially mediate the association of perceived CSR and ECB. Hence, the hypothesized perception-emotion-attitude-behavior model received a significant support and demonstrated that micro-level positive consequences of CSR could be created through emotional, attitude, and behavioral mechanisms. The organization should promote their CSR activities using documentaries and contents to improve their perception of environmental and social issues, and it enhances employees’ pride and creativity.
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The rankings literature implicitly assumes that rankings success universally benefits organizations. However, in some instances, this assumption may be unwarranted. In this study, we employ a mixed‐methods approach that moves the literature beyond examining whether employees leave, to examine who leaves elite Best Places to Work (BPTW), defined as organizations which place in the top ten in BPTW rankings perennially (i.e., year after year). In Study 1, examination of elite BPTW organizations shows that proportions of voluntary turnover comprising high performers increase over associated BPTW ranking cycles. Study 2 commences with 40 semi‐structured interviews among employees in an elite BPTW organization, from which two relevant and explanatory themes emerge. First, some employees interpret BPTW success as restricting opportunities for advancement within the organization, a phenomenon we term “perceived promotion constraint.” Second, some employees perceive BPTW success as building their own personal resumes. Integrating our findings from Study 1 and the qualitative portion of Study 2 with the career management literature, we propose and deductively test “perceived promotion constraint” and “perceived resume building” as two potential high performer turnover mechanisms; finding that perceived promotion constraint mediates the relationship between performance status and turnover intentions.
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city whereas rarely literate people live in rural area. Even worst, population of the country has already touched the 1.3 billion mark; according to a survey such a large population requires tremendous physical and Human resources in order to serve them. Being a developed country, India is padding with great budget constraints. However, citizen expectations towards government have increased tremendously led by the rising number of youths. Developing countries across the world are not fairly relying on IT for the managing their office. Instead, manual system of working is prevalent. For the effective usage of IT, citizen’s literacy needs to be high. Realizing this need, government of India has envisioned a new scheme tilting ‘digital India’. The prime objective of this scheme is to increase the digital literacy and to empower the citizens. This scheme will cover the Pan India in phased manner. This is a collaborative scheme of central and state governments to felicitate the faster implementation of any project and to reduce hassle. Digital India aims to offer a single window of contact for any government request. Initially, it will solely be funded by the central government; gradually state government has to contribute their shares. Cloud computing has emerged as utility based model where subscribers are paying as you go model(Yeo, Buyya, R., & Assuncao, et. al, 2007). Minimum upfront cost, no significant up-gradation in hardware and software purchase, etc. are some of the significant benefits of cloud computing. Cloud computing can be leveraged by subscribing to the variety of services offered by the cloud provider. Subscriber can subscribe to platform as service(PaaS), software as service(SaaS) or infrastructure as Service(IaaS) offered by the cloud paradigm through its public, private, hybrid and community model of cloud computing (Singh, 2014 ; Ring, 2015). Majority of the cloud services can be accessed with the help of wide variety of devices including desktop, laptop, tablets, Smartphone’s etc (Mell and Grance, 2013). In addition, there is no restriction of place and time of accessibility. These unique features are widely appreciated by the subscribers and consequently this paradigm has witnessed 25% compound annual growth rate (CAGR). Amazon, Microsoft, Go Grid, IBM tec. Are the prominent cloud service providers and offering their services in range of domain including IaaS, PaaS, SaaS, etc (Schrutt, 2013;Singh, 2014)).
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In recent decades, the emergence of hybrid organizational forms has placed new demands on the role of human resource management (HRM) contributing to organizational goals. Moreover, research emphasizes that the increasing hybridity of contexts, stakeholder requirements, and goals lead to organizational tensions that, if not properly addressed, can lead to organizational downfall. However, although organization and management research recognize the importance of elaborating HRM roles for hybrid contexts, drawing upon findings from the hybrid literature has been widely neglected. Thus, by mapping the research landscape regarding hybridity, this article provides insight into the configuration of organizational HRM roles and functions that contribute to the development of hybrid goals and are associated to the management of tensions. Significantly, this article introduces three specific HRM roles— hybrid strategist, capability adapter, and identification generator—as essential HRM roles for hybrid contexts.
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Organizations are obligated to provide Corporate Social Responsibilities to the society share their profitable, in developing the society or where ever there is a requirement for the need for developments. Likewise, CSR activities also help in improving the Employer and Employee relationship on enhancing their work culture which leads to productive output, this also helps in a win-win situation for achieving the organization goals. The purpose of the research is to study the influences of corporate social responsibility activities in creating the organization attractiveness (OA) among individual employees. The research is to identify and evaluate the attractiveness the CSR created towards the employees. At the same time to address the gap in creating OA. The Research developed the ABCE model (cognitive, affective, behavioural, new effective rational belief) to assess the individual attractiveness among employees. The structure is grounded with The integration of two models cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and Rational emotive behaviour therapy (REBT Ellis, 1957). Research conducted the empirical study in India collecting data among corporate employees-greatly profound towards CSR subjects. The research identifies that implementation of correct/ suitable CSR activities creates attractiveness to the employees towards their organization.
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Research has shown that the use of digital technologies in the personnel selection process can have both positive and negative effects on applicants’ attraction to an organization. We explain this contradiction by specifying its underlying mechanisms. Drawing on signaling theory, we build a conceptual model that applies two different theoretical lenses (instrumental-symbolic framework and justice theory) to suggest that perceptions of innovativeness and procedural justice explain the relationship between an organization’s use of digital selection methods and employer attractiveness perceptions. We test our model by utilizing two studies, namely one experimental vignette study among potential applicants (N = 475) and one retrospective field study among actual job applicants (N = 335). With the exception of the assessment stage in Study 1, the positive indirect effects found in both studies indicated that applicants perceive digital selection methods to be more innovative. While Study 1 also revealed a negative indirect effect, with potential applicants further perceiving digital selection methods as less fair than less digitalized methods in the interview stage, this effect was not significant for actual job applicants in Study 2. We discuss theoretical implications for the applicant reactions literature and offer recommendations for human resource managers to make use of positive signaling effects while reducing potential negative signaling effects linked to the use of digital selection methods.
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The primary aim of this study is to analyse the impact of the dimensions of the Employer Brand on a candidate’s intention to pursue an employer. Secondly, the focus is on analysing the mediation effect of Perceived Organisation Prestige (POP) between the independent variable (Employer Brand) and the dependent variable (organisation pursuit intention), followed by an evaluation of the moderating effect of Person–Organisation Fit (POF) between POP and Organisation Pursuit Intention (OPI). Data for this study was collected from 419 final year students of engineering at various Central and State universities of Delhi, India, as per the approved list of Institutions by the University Grant Commission (UGC). Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA), followed by Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), has been applied to validate the adopted scales in the current context. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) has been used to analyse the underlying relationship between the dimensions of Employer Brand and OPI, along with the mediating effect of POP and the moderating effect of POF in this context. This study finds a significant relationship between independent variables (career enhancement opportunity, work culture, company reputation, salary and other incentives and CSR and ethics) and organisation pursuit intention (independent variable). Furthermore, perceived organisation prestige was found to mediate the respective relationship of career enhancement opportunity (complete mediation), corporate reputation (partial mediation) and Salary and other incentives (partial mediation) with the candidate’s pursuit intention. Also, the POF (moderator) was found to have a significant impact on the relationship between the POP and the organisation pursuit intention. This is the first study of its kind to investigate the dimensions of Employer Brand that determine the intentions of a candidate to pursue an organisation for employment. Also, past research studies have highlighted the concept and importance of employer attractiveness in the international context with a focus on management graduates and working executives. However, the current study elaborates the analysis of the pursuit intentions of final year students of engineering in India, who aspire to secure a job in the near future. In addition, previous studies have not focused much on the mediating effect of an organisation’s prestige between the Employer Brand and OPI. Lastly, some studies have investigated POF as a mediator but this study explains its effect as a moderator between the POP (mediator) and the candidate’s pursuit intentions (dependent variable).
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In today’s competitive labor market, firms use employer branding strategies to engage their workforce for better performance. However, the current understanding of the role of employer branding in firm-level performance in the context of developing countries is very limited. This study aims to investigate the importance of employee retention and recruitment efficiency to strengthen the relationship between employer branding and firm-level performance. Data are collected from 316 Azerbaijani firms that are tagged by the Glassdoor and reviewed by former employees. Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypotheses. The results of the study show that employer branding can enhance firm-level performance through employee retention and recruitment efficiency. However, online employee reviews on the Glassdoor do not moderate the connection between employer branding and employee retention. Current employees feel motivated to continue working with those companies which show excellent employer strategies. Furthermore, a firm’s strategy to attract the best employee pool improves firm-level performance. It is also concluded that employees working in developing countries do not concern about online reviews on their employer, and prefer to continue working despite contrary thoughts. Acknowledgment Author acknowledges the financial support provided by Internal Grant Agency (IGA/FaME/2019/008) of FaME through Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic.
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Purpose Acknowledging the importance of work–family practices that extend beyond what is legally mandated and that cover the needs of a diverse workforce, this paper offers a conceptual model that explores the factors that can influence the provision and inclusiveness of work–family policies in organizations. Design/methodology/approach The conceptual model is based on a thorough literature review of relevant articles in the fields of management and political science. Findings In line with the upper echelons perspective, chief executive officers’ (CEOs') political ideology is a multidimensional concept, comprising two main dimensions (financial and social) that can influence the provision and inclusiveness of work–family practices. Moreover, the proposed conceptual model considers other important factors, such as the centrality of the CEO's political ideology, as potential moderating factors, as well as the conditional role of institutional pressures. Finally, the proposed model takes into account the important role of line managers/supervisors in the implementation of work–family policies and shows the importance of the provision and inclusiveness of work–family practices for critical organizational outcomes (organizational attraction and turnover). Originality/value The proposed conceptual model offers a more in-depth understanding of the factors that influence the provision and inclusiveness of work–family policies.
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The research aims to identify impact models of a healthy working environment and the organization's reputation on the employee's organizational fit. The research population is all private banks in Baghdad, a sample of six banks was selected. 200 questionnaires were distributed, 158 of them returned, 141 of them were valid for analysis. The research employed three approaches: Historical, descriptive, and analytical. To clarify the research's concepts, the first approach was adopted, to clarify the dimensions of the research, the second approach was adopted, and to analyzing the research's dimensions the analytical approach was used. The Amos, 21 software was used to assess the validity of the study model, and the data were analyzed using the spss, 23 programs. The study came up with many conclusions, the most noteworthy of which was that: At the overall and sub-level, the healthy working environment has a statistically significant impact on the employee's organizational fit. And the organization's reputation plays a role in the employee's organizational fit, the impact models between the two dimensions at the overall and sub-level were significant and statistical. The research produced a series of recommendations based on these findings, intending to put their findings into reality .
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A company's reputation can be crucial in attracting and retaining talented employees. And brand's relevancy is a synthesis of all the efforts put towards an employee and potential candidates who then interpret this is a good working place. The importance of branding is high as it strengthens competitive advantage, and its relevancy is also seen during the process of attracting and retaining talented employees to a company promoted as a desired working place. As a response to numerous challenges on the job market, companies tend to compete in branding strategies - from dedicated branding to broad corporative branding. Despite the fact that communication made on social media, with the goal to build a positive image and reputation, is less susceptible to control than traditional media, the process of creating a positive perception of the brand leads to companies using mediums which enable a real and interactive contact with target audience. Numerous research show that posting information on social media, as available, frequent and cheap communication channels, establishes a two-way communication and ensures there is feedback.
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Greenwashing occurs when companies deliberately deceive or mislead stakeholders regarding their environmental practices or benefits of a product/service. Most existing greenwashing studies focus on consumers, and the effects on employees have seldom been examined. Furthermore, little is known about how employees may respond emotionally to their company's greenwashing practices. Accordingly, the current research conducted an empirical study of the relationship between employees’ greenwashing perception and their career satisfaction. The mediating roles of organizational pride, negative emotions, and affective commitment are also examined. Based on information collected through a questionnaire applied to 398 Portuguese employees, a quantitative, causal, cross-sectional study was carried out, using structural equation model techniques, through AMOS. The results indicate that employees’ perception of greenwashing relates negatively to their career satisfaction, organizational pride, and affective commitment. In turn, negative emotions are positively impacted by greenwashing. The results also reveal that the path between perceived greenwashing of employees and career satisfaction is established not only directly, but also through organizational pride and affective commitment. This study extends the literature by addressing the neglected side of employees’ emotional reactions to greenwashing. Based on the central premise that corporate greenwashing is inherently an immoral act, we draw upon appraisal theory and moral foundations theory to investigate short-term (affective commitment, negative emotions, and organizational pride) and long-term work-related effects (career satisfaction) as an outcome for greenwashing.
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Reputation is an important strategic resource. The aim of this work is to develop a structural model to measure reputation specific to horticulture. Based on a literature analysis, the terms image, identity and reputation are first defined before compiling a basis of knowledge relating to reputation measurement approaches from different fields (e.g., companies, industries). The measurement of “reputation” requires indicators whose epistemic relations (formative vs. reflective) need to be analyzed in order to avoid misspecification. Indicators were established from different research approaches, combined in a “multiple indicators and multiple causes” (MIMIC) model and supplemented through the influence of moderating variables.
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Employees with relevant knowledge and skills for digitalization have become increasingly important for the competitiveness of MNCs. However, the shortage of such digital human capital in many host countries is putting pressure on MNC subsidiaries to prevent these employees from leaving. We theorize that the retention of digital human capital in MNC subsidiaries does not merely depend on salaries but crucially on the learning opportunities that subsidiaries offer. By integrating mechanisms from the literature on subsidiary-specific advantages into theoretical models explaining voluntary mobility constraints of employees, we reason that the opportunities for acquiring new skills in subsidiaries with advanced digital expertise will reduce the odds of losing these valuable employees. We test our theoretical predictions for 11,598 employees with digital human capital working for 866 foreign MNC subsidiaries in Denmark observed between 2002 and 2012. We find that digital expertise helps retaining digital human capital. The effect is stronger if subsidiaries have an internationally diverse workforce and when they possess patented technologies. Both factors provide distinct learning opportunities from digital expertise. The effect is weaker if the subsidiary is located in regional clusters of digital expertise since alternative employers may offer similar learning opportunities.
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Attracting talent is key for every organization. This research introduces a novel way to attract talent: creative workspace design. In two studies with complementary samples and methods, we examine whether, when, and how a firm's creative workspace design enhances organizational attractiveness. In Study 1, we use an experimental design to examine the attraction effect of creative (vs. conventional) workspace design from the applicant's perspective. First and foremost, we find that creative workspace design has a positive effect on organizational attractiveness. Second, our findings reveal two underlying mechanisms that help to explain this positive attraction effect: perceived climate for creativity and perceived innovation ability of the firm. Moreover, findings show that this attraction effect is stronger for highly creative (vs. less creative) individuals and attenuated for high-value (vs. low-value) workspaces. In Study 2, we validate the positive attraction effect of creative workspace design from the firm's perspective by using international survey data on a firm level. Taken together, this work sheds new light on how workspace design influences organizational attractiveness, elucidates why and when applicants are attracted by creative workspace design, and provides actionable implications for practice.
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The tendency to "bask in reflected glory" (BIRG) by publicly announcing one's associations with successful others was investigated in 3 field experiments with more than 300 university students. All 3 studies showed this effect to occur even though the person striving to bask in the glory of a successful source was not involved in the cause of the source's success. Exp I demonstrated the BIRG phenomenon by showing a greater tendency for university students to wear school-identifying apparel after their school's football team had been victorious than nonvictorious. Exps II and III replicated this effect by showing that students used the pronoun we more when describing victory than a nonvictory of their school's football team. A model was developed asserting that the BIRG response represents an attempt to enhance one's public image. Exps II and III indicated, in support of this assertion, that the tendency to proclaim a connection with a positive source was strongest when one's public image was threatened. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Although much professional and managerial hiring involves experienced workers, previous recruitment research has focused almost exclusively on new college graduates. To remedy this imbalance, 251 staffing professionals were surveyed concerning experienced-versus-college hiring practices in their organizations. Results suggest that a majority of positions requiring a college degree are filled with experienced workers. Experienced hires are evaluated more highly than new graduates on most characteristics (understanding business, knowledge of competition, realistic expectations, technical skills, interpersonal skills, writing skills, work ethic, likelihood of success, personal ethics), although new graduates are evaluated more highly on open-mindedness and willingness and ability to learn new things. Higher proportions of experienced hiring are associated with organizational growth, short-term staffing strategies, older workforces, and less dynamic business environments. Perceived success of experienced hiring is associated with greater use of effective recruitment sources, older workforces, and more competitive salary offers.
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Over a 30-year period, 57,000 job applicants of a public utility ranked the importance of 10 factors that make a job good or bad. The order for men is security, advancement, type of work, company, pay, co-workers, supervisor, benefits, hours, and working conditions. Women consider type of work more important than any other factor, followed by company, security, co-workers, advancement, supervisor, pay, working conditions, hours, and benefits. Preferences attributed to others differ markedly from self-preferences, with both men and women believing pay is most important to others. Data are analyzed by sex, age, marital status, dependents, education, and occupation. Some major differences exist, but by and large the effects are small. Although changes during the 30-year period are relatively inconsequential, there was an increase in importance of benefits, pay, and type of work, and a decrease in importance of advancement and security. Type of work has gradually replaced security as the most important factor for men. Differences between applicants and employees are relatively minor, as also are differences between public utility workers and employees of other types of companies.
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The tendency to "bask in reflected glory" (BIRG) by publicly announcing one's associations with successful others was investigated in 3 field experiments with more than 300 university students. All 3 studies showed this effect to occur even though the person striving to bask in the glory of a successful source was not involved in the cause of the source's success. Exp I demonstrated the BIRG phenomenon by showing a greater tendency for university students to wear school-identifying apparel after their school's football team had been victorious than nonvictorious. Exps II and III replicated this effect by showing that students used the pronoun we more when describing victory than a nonvictory of their school's football team. A model was developed asserting that the BIRG response represents an attempt to enhance one's public image. Exps II and III indicated, in support of this assertion, that the tendency to proclaim a connection with a positive source was strongest when one's public image was threatened. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).
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In I/O psychology and organizational behavior (I/OB) the realistic job preview (RJP) is a current example of an attitude change technique designed to reduce turnover among newly hired employees. Social psychology has long been concerned with theories and techniques for attitude change, and these are examined as potential aids to understanding the RJP process. The “Yale Persuasive Communication” (YPC) approach is reviewed, and findings from YPC research are presented as illustrations of how the future RJPs might be redesigned.
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The author presents a conceptual model of brand equity from the perspective of the individual consumer. Customer-based brand equity is defined as the differential effect of brand knowledge on consumer response to the marketing of the brand. A brand is said to have positive (negative) customer-based brand equity when consumers react more (less) favorably to an element of the marketing mix for the brand than they do to the same marketing mix element when it is attributed to a fictitiously named or unnamed version of the product or service. Brand knowledge is conceptualized according to an associative network memory model in terms of two components, brand awareness and brand image (i. e., a set of brand associations). Customer-based brand equity occurs when the consumer is familiar with the brand and holds some favorable, strong, and unique brand associations in memory. Issues in building, measuring, and managing customer-based brand equity are discussed, as well as areas for future research.
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The authors develop a new survey-based method for measuring and understanding a brand's equity in a product category and evaluating the equity of the brand's extension into a different but related product category. It uses a customer-based definition of brand equity as the added value endowed by the brand to the product as perceived by a consumer. It measures brand equity as the difference between an individual consumer's overall brand preference and his or her brand preference on the basis of objectively measured product attribute levels. To understand the sources of brand equity, the approach divides brand equity into attribute-based and nonattribute-based components. The method provides the market share premium and the price premium attributable to brand equity. The survey-based results from applying the method to the toothpaste and mouthwash categories show that the proposed approach has good reliability, convergent validity, and predictive validity.
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This paper reports the results of an experiment designed to examine the possible impact of (1) the corporate image of the advertiser and (2) the degree of specificity of the candidate qualifications, on the likelihood of reader response to a recruitment advertisement. The data indicated that the corporate image of the advertiser significantly influenced the likelihood of reader response, whereas the degree of specificity of the candidate qualifications did not significantly influence the likelihood of reader response to recruitment advertisement. The implications of the findings are discussed and avenues for further study are suggested.
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We develop a model to explain how images of one's work organization shape the strength of his or her identification with the organization. We focus on two key organizational images: one based on what a member believes is distinctive, central, and enduring about his or her organization and one based on a member's beliefs about what outsiders think about the organization. According to the model, members assess the attractiveness of these images by how well the image preserves the continuity of their self-concept, provides distinctiveness, and enhances self-esteem. The model leads to a number of propositions about how organizational identification affects members' patterns of social interaction.
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Over a 30-yr period, 57,000 job applicants of a public utility ranked the importance of 10 factors that make a job good or bad. The order for men is security, advancement, type of work, company, pay, co-workers, supervisor, benefits, hours, and working conditions. Women consider type of work more important than any other factor, followed by company, security, co-workers, advancement, supervisor, pay, working conditions, hours, and benefits. Preferences attributed to others differ markedly from self-preferences, with both men and women believing that pay is important to others. Data were analyzed by sex, age, marital status, dependents, education, and occupation. Some major differences exist, but by and large the effects were small. Although changes during the 30-yr period are relatively inconsequential, there was an increase in importance of benefits, pay, and type of work, and a decrease in importance of advancement and security. Type of work has gradually replaced security as the most important factor for men. Differences between applicants and employees are relatively minor, as also are differences between public utility workers and employees of other types of companies. (15 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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The investigation was of the effects of explicit commitment to employment-at-will personnel policies vs due process policies, and compensation strategy (leading vs average), in recruiting materials, on corporate impressions and job pursuit intentions. Ss were 101 undergraduate business students who read simulated employment brochures. Significant main effects and interaction effects were found for the influence of personnel and compensation policies on reported favorability of corporate impression and intentions to pursue employment. Findings are discussed in terms of the need to strike a balance between employer and employee rights. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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Previous research on the factors which affect applicant decisions concerning jobs has focused on the effects of either job attributes or recruiting practices. The present study examined the simultaneous impact of job attributes and recruiting practices on the likelihood of job acceptance by actual job applicants. Path analysis revealed that job attributes but not recruiting practices influenced the likelihood of job acceptance by graduating college students (N= 200). Given that college students might be expected to be the job applicants most swayed by recruiting practices because of their lack of work experience, the results suggest that the emphasis placed on recruiting practices as determinants of applicant decisions may be overstated in the literature.
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With the intent of encouraging interdisciplinary research, this study applies principles, theories, and practices of marketing management to examine engineering recruitment as a process of “job marketing.” Six hypotheses concerning campus recruiters and strategic recruiting issues were proposed and investigated through a national survey of 242 graduating engineers representing five engineering fields. Survey responses revealed that both overall satisfaction with recruiting processes and likelihood of job acceptance were significantly related to recruiter interpersonal skills and interview information provided about compensation/benefits, job/career, and security/success issues. Further, student satisfaction with recruiting processes was significantly related to recruiter/job applicant similarity in gender and educational characteristics. Contrary to conventional inferences of recruiting research, students did not respond more favorably to line management or engineering recruiters than to personnel representatives. Implications of these findings are identified and discussed in terms of both the marketing and management literatures.
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The present study investigated the degree to which pay preferences influenced job search decisions in both hypothetical and actual organizations, and the degree to which preferences for particular compensation attributes depended on job seekers' dispositional characteristics. Based on prior theory and research, we hypothesized that certain pay systems generally would be preferred by job seekers, that these pay systems would affect applicant attraction to organizations, and that different types of job seekers would be attracted to different types of pay systems. The sample comprised 171 college students who were seeking jobs during the study, and who represented six majors, three degree types, and two degree levels. Experimental policy-capturing results and results obtained about actual companies with which the job seekers would potentially interview supported hypotheses that organizations perceived to offer high pay levels, flexible benefits, individual-based pay, and fixed pay policies were more attractive to job seekers. Results further suggested that the attractiveness of these pay policies may be heightened by greater levels of fit between individual personality traits and compensation system characteristics.
Chapter
HYPOTHESIZES THAT MERE REPEATED EXPOSURE OF THE INDIVIDUAL TO A STIMULUS OBJECT ENHANCES HIS ATTITUDE TOWARD IT. BY "MERE" EXPOSURE IS MEANT A CONDITION MAKING THE STIMULUS ACCESSIBLE TO PERCEPTION. SUPPORT FOR THE HYPOTHESIS CONSISTS OF 4 TYPES OF EVIDENCE, PRESENTED AND REVIEWED: (1) THE CORRELATION BETWEEN AFFECTIVE CONNOTATION OF WORDS AND WORD FREQUENCY, (2) THE EFFECT OF EXPERIMENTALLY MANIPULATED FREQUENCY OF EXPOSURE UPON THE AFFECTIVE CONNOTATION OF NONSENSE WORDS AND SYMBOLS, (3) THE CORRELATION BETWEEN WORD FREQUENCY AND THE ATTITUDE TO THEIR REFERENTS, AND (4) THE EFFECTS OF EXPERIMENTALLY MANIPULATED FREQUENCY OF EXPOSURE ON ATTITUDE. THE RELEVANCE FOR THE EXPOSURE-ATTITUDE HYPOTHESIS OF THE EXPLORATION THEORY AND OF THE SEMANTIC SATIATION FINDINGS WERE EXAMINED. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).
Article
I extended recruitment research by sampling from the applicant population to investigate factors related to a firm's attractiveness as an employer on college campuses. Specifically, I surveyed potential applicants at nine different universities and university personnel (faculty and placement staff) at eight of those universities to investigate relationships of recruitment activities, organizational attributes, familiarity with the firm, and the social context with a firm's attractiveness as an employer. Results indicated that recruitment activities influenced firm attractiveness through influencing perceptions of organizational attributes. Additionally, familiarity with the firm and the social context, operationalized as perceptions of university personnel, were related to potential applicants' attraction to the firm. Finally, of additional interest was the finding of no differences in perceptions of organizational attributes or attraction to the firm between respondents who interviewed with the firm and respondents who had not interviewed with the firm. The implications of such results for firms interested in attracting applicants are discussed.