Article

Acculturation, Parent‐Adolescent Conflict, and Adolescent Adjustment in Mexican American Families

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
Family Process (Impact Factor: 1.73). 02/2006; 45(1):75 - 86. DOI: 10.1111/j.1545-5300.2006.00081.x

ABSTRACT

We tested an acculturation model in a community sample of Mexican American families (146 mothers, 137 fathers, and 146 adolescents) that proposed that differences between parents and adolescents in acculturation would be associated with parent-adolescent conflict and adolescent adjustment problems. Contrary to hypotheses, we found that families who exhibited an acculturation gap were not more likely to report parent-adolescent conflict or adolescent adjustment problems. In fact, familial conflict and adolescent sexual experience were associated with high levels of acculturation among adolescents and their parents. Pending replication, these findings suggest that both parent and children acculturation may independently predict familial processes and youth outcomes, irrespective of an acculturation gap. Future research should consider other factors aside from acculturation differences that might account for parent-adolescent conflict and adolescent adjustment in Mexican American families.

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Available from: Carlos Penilla, Jan 23, 2014
    • "This finding concurred with the conclusions reached in previous studies where the relationship between inter-parental conflict and adolescents' reports of internalizing symptoms and general psychopathology were examined (see Moschis, 2007). On the basis of our expectation, the previous research findings supported the fact that family conflict is positively associated with an adolescents' perceived level of stress (Costigan and Dokis, 2006; Pasch et al., 2006). These findings are consistent with a number of prior studies where stress was considered as a major source for the adolescent compulsive buyingCB behaviour (see Roberts et al., 2003; Moschis, 2007, Robert et al., 2012). "
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The compulsive buying (CB)behaviour has become topics of increasing interest to researchers and policy makers, particularly because researches have shown that it can influence consumer behaviour and well-being. However, a clear picture of how this phenomenon arises has proven elusive. Using the adolescents perceived level of stress as an integrative framework, the purpose of this paper is to derive hypotheses from two theoretical perspectives (the stress and CB behaviour), and uses a survey of adolescents (15-18) year in India to test the hypotheses. Design/methodology/approach – The present study is the first to experimentally manipulate important stressors in the lives of adolescents, i.e. familial and non-familial; and measures its impact on CB among a sample of 15-18-year old adolescents. Next, the authors investigate the relationship between CB and post-purchase regret and then whether gender moderates the stress-CB relationship. Findings – The present study finds that adolescents increasingly turn to CB in an attempt to cope with heightened levels of stress due to familial and non-familial factors. Surprisingly, findings reveal that non-familial factors are not a major source of stress among adolescents. Gender was not found to moderate stress-CB relationship. Both boys and girls were found to respond to higher levels of stress with higher incidences of CB. Results suggest that CB behaviour is a common coping strategy for adolescents from both genders. The findings indicate that one's experiences and circumstances in adolescence are related to their CB behaviour, thus a framework has been used to elucidate them, have important implications for theory and practice. Originality/value – The study makes some inimitable and significant contributions to the literature. It portrays one of few studies to investigate CB during adolescence period – a hard to reach population. Here authors experimentally manipulate stress levels to investigate its impact on CB. The study's findings in regard to gender's impact on the stress-CB relationship suggest that CB begins during adolescence period and is a common coping strategy for both boys and girls.
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    • "As a state of tension and dispute [6], it is a significant stressor related to negative feelings and emotions [7]. Parent-adolescent conflicts are related to a number of externalizing and internalizing adolescent problems [8] including low self-esteem, and depression [9], and decreases family cohesion [10]. Studies have indicated that a moderate level of conflict may be healthy whereas higher levels may be unhealthy [11] [12]. "
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    ABSTRACT: The research is aimed to test construct validity of Conflict Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ-44) using confirmatory factor analysis. Additionally, potential gender invariance is tested as a result of item sensitivity of scale. Following the back translation method, data of 494 adolescents (girls=203, boys=291) was collected from different institutes of Lahore, Rawalpindi and Islamabad. Sample age ranged 11-23 years with Mean age ±SD (19.25, ±2.33 years). Construct validation was tested by conducting confirmatory factor analysis using Mplus Version 6.12. Results presented good model fit of Conflict Behavior Questionnaire-44 for a two components model and all items loaded well on their respective scales. Cronbach's Alpha of the two components (i.e., .73 and 89) suggested that scales are reliable. Significant positive bivariate correlation with issue check list (i.e., r=.24; and r=.26, p<.01, for Appraisal of parents, and Appraisal of dyads respectively) evidenced the convergent validity whereas significant negative bivariate correlation with Authoritative Father (i.e., r=-.39, and r=-.34; p<.01) and Authoritative Mother (i.e., r=-.34, and r=-.37; p<.01 ) for Appraisal of parents, and Appraisal of dyads respectively evidenced criterion related validity of CBQ-44 adolescent version. Though CFA across gender also showed good fit of the model to the data (i.e., χ2(df)= 1919.86 (1842), CFI=.95, TLI=.94, and RMSEA=.02) equality constraints for all parameters in a step by step approach resulted in a significant model fit decrease. Our findings support the two component model of CBQ-44 adolescent version yet suggest that the items on the instrument are not equally sensitive for male and female adolescent.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
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    • "As a state of tension and dispute [6], it is a significant stressor related to negative feelings and emotions [7]. Parent-adolescent conflicts are related to a number of externalizing and internalizing adolescent problems [8] including low self-esteem, and depression [9], and decreases family cohesion [10]. Studies have indicated that a moderate level of conflict may be healthy whereas higher levels may be unhealthy [11] [12]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The research is aimed to test construct validity of Conflict Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ-44) using confirmatory factor analysis. Additionally, potential gender invariance is tested as a result of item sensitivity of scale. Following the back translation method, data of 494 adolescents (girls=203, boys=291) was collected from different institutes of Lahore, Rawalpindi and Islamabad. Sample age ranged 11-23 years with Mean age ±SD (19.25, ±2.33 years). Construct validation was tested by conducting confirmatory factor analysis using Mplus Version 6.12. Results presented good model fit of Conflict Behavior Questionnaire-44 for a two components model and all items loaded well on their respective scales. Cronbach's Alpha of the two components (i.e., .73 and 89) suggested that scales are reliable. Significant positive bivariate correlation with issue check list (i.e., r=.24; and r=.26, p<.01, for Appraisal of parents, and Appraisal of dyads respectively) evidenced the convergent validity whereas significant negative bivariate correlation with Authoritative Father (i.e., r=-.39, and r=-.34; p<.01) and Authoritative Mother (i.e., r=-.34, and r=-.37; p<.01 ) for Appraisal of parents, and Appraisal of dyads respectively evidenced criterion related validity of CBQ-44 adolescent version. Though CFA across gender also showed good fit of the model to the data (i.e., χ2(df)= 1919.86 (1842), CFI=.95, TLI=.94, and RMSEA=.02) equality constraints for all parameters in a step by step approach resulted in a significant model fit decrease. Our findings support the two component model of CBQ-44 adolescent version yet suggest that the items on the instrument are not equally sensitive for male and female adolescent.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
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