Article

The relationship between depression and regional cerebral blood flow in Parkinson’s disease and the effect of selegiline treatment

Acta Neurologica Scandinavica (Impact Factor: 2.4). 06/2011; 124(1):28 - 39. DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01443.x

ABSTRACT

Imamura K, Okayasu N, Nagatsu T. The relationship between depression and regional cerebral blood flow in Parkinson’s disease and the effect of selegiline treatment. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 124: 28–39. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Objectives – We examined the relationship between severity of depression in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the reaction to levodopa-selegiline combination therapy.
Materials and methods – We evaluated 52 patients with PD and nine age-matched controls with SPECT and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to evaluate depression severity and its connection with rCBF. Furthermore, we examined rCBF in patients with PD treated with levodopa with or without selegiline.
Results – A significant fall in rCBF was observed in the bilateral posterior cingulate, hippocampus, and cuneus and the superior parietal and primary visual areas in PD patients with minor depression and in all regions in those with major depression. Elevations in UPDRS part III and BDI scores and falls in MMSE scores were of significantly lower magnitude in the levodopa-selegiline group than in the levodopa group. Whole brain rCBF fell significantly less in the levodopa-selegiline group than in the levodopa group.
Conclusions – These results indicate that selegiline controlled not only worsening of motor function and cognitive function in PD but also aggravation of minor depression, and restrained a fall in whole brain rCBF.

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    • "Of the studies that evaluated CBF, only Matsui et al. (2006) evaluated patients with minor depression and PD: they found hypoperfusion in the upper and lower left frontal gyri in patients with depression compared with those without this condition. As a follow-up study, Imamura et al. (2011) found an overall reduction in the CBF of patients with PD and major depression compared with healthy controls. Likewise, patients with minor depression and PD showed a decreased uptake compared than healthy controls, in the following brain regions: the posterior cingulate, the hippocampus, the superior parietal lobule, the cuneus, the primary visual areas, the left medial frontal lobe, the parahippocampus, the insula, the thalamus, the putamen, the inferior parietal lobe, the temporal lobe, and the premotor area. "
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