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Abstract

In this study, the stability of arsenic compounds in fresh and frozen samples of raw, boiled and fried Atlantic cod (Gadhus morhua), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) were exam-ined. Results show that the total arsenic concentrations of the fresh Atlantic cod and Atlantic salmon samples were not different from the frozen samples within the same seafood type. For blue mussel, the total arsenic concentration decreased significantly after storage. Inorganic arsenic was found only in blue mussels and, importantly, no significant increase of inorganic arsenic was observed after process-ing or after storage by freezing. The content of tetramethylarsonium ion was generally low in all samples types, but increased significantly in all fried samples of both fresh and frozen seafood. Upon storage by freezing, the arsenobetaine content was reduced significantly, but only in the samples of blue mussels.

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Article
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Article
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Article
As a safeguard for human health, guidelines and regulations stipulating maximum permissible concentrations (MPCs) of metals in foods have been set to limit our dietary exposure to toxic metals. It is now well accepted, however, that the chemical form of the metal must be considered when assessing the possible human health consequences of exposure, and this in turn has led to discussion on the incorporation of speciation data in the setting of MPCs for metals in foods. Some practical aspects and implications of framing food legislation in terms of metal species are presented.
Article
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The Norwegian Action Plan on Nutrition Recipe for a healthier diet
  • Norwegian
Norwegian Ministries (2007). The Norwegian Action Plan on Nutrition (2007–2011) Recipe for a healthier diet. Report from Ministry of Health and Care Services