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Promoting Participation in Public Life Through Secondary Education: Evidence from Honduras

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... As FUNDAEC quietly evolved over the past 35 years, its unique approach to education has gained increasing recognition. Its SAT program in particular has received several international awards including the European Expo 2000 Jury Verdict and the Club of Budapest Change the World -Best Practice Award for its contributions towards social and economic development in rural areas (Honeyman, 2004;Murphy-Graham, 2007). In 2008, the SAT program was recognized by the United Nations as a "best practice model" for rural sustainable development (United Nations, 2008). ...
... A later study illustrates evidence of increased participation of rural Honduran women SAT graduates in public life, in comparison to the control group (Murphy-Graham, 2007). ...
... 6 En el año 2002, el Club de Budapest reconoció a FUNDAEC con el premio Change the World-Best Practice Award (Cambiar al Mundo -Premio para la Mejor Práctica), destacando la implementación del programa de Sistema de Aprendizaje Tutorial-SAT, describiéndolo como un enfoque educacional radicalmente innovador por su esfuerzo en hacer dialogar a la ciencia moderna con el conocimiento tradicional de las poblaciones autóctonas, así como su promoción de una cultura del aprendizaje sobre el aprendizaje (http://theclubofbudapest.com/index.php/en/about-us/honours-list). Además, en los últimos 20 años se han realizado una serie de investigaciones académicas sobre esta experiencia, en gran parte desde los campos de la educación, el desarrollo rural, la enseñanza de las ciencias, filosofía de la educación y estudios sobre agencia (RoldanVillegas, 2000;Molineaux, 2005; Legget, 2006;Murphy Graham, 2007;VanderDussen, 2009; Kwauk y Perlman, 2015;Lample, 2015;Correa, 2015; Karlberg y Correa, 2016;Farid, 2016). ...
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En el escenario actual de emergencia de discursos y prácticas de transición civilizatoria en América Latina ante la expansión de la crisis socio-ecológica, el presente artículo analiza los hallazgos de un estudio de caso realizado en el territorio de Norte del Cauca, Colombia, sobre la experiencia del Centro Universitario de Bienestar Rural (CUBR) de FUNDAEC, basada en la combinación entre contenidos espirituales y materiales en una variedad de ámbitos de los procesos de vida rural, entre ellos los económicos. El estudio releva la semántica emergente de esta iniciativa, basada en una noción de transformación centrada en la interacción entre sistemas de conocimiento y la participación de las poblaciones en el aprendizaje sobre senderos de bienestar desde su propia realidad, identificando algunos aprendizajes relevantes a través de un estudio fenomenológico en una comunidad.
... Third, knowledge integration has social justice implications such as affirming the autonomy, sovereignty, and identity of indigenous communities. Intercultural education has been claimed to improve the equity of relations between indigenous and dominant societies; to reduce prejudice and stereotyping; to strengthen democracy; and to assist nonindigenous actors to accept social and environmental responsibilities (Agrawal 1995, Aikman 1997, Gundara 2000, Murphy-Graham 2007, Honeyman 2010). ...
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Intercultural education seeks to create a forum for integrating Western scientific knowledge and indigenous knowledge to address local and global challenges such as biocultural diversity conservation, natural resource management, and social justice for indigenous peoples. Intercultural education is based on learning together with, rather than learning about or from, indigenous communities. In the best examples, problem-based learning dissolves the dichotomy between indigenous and nonindigenous, resulting in full partnerships in which participants share expertise to meet mutual needs. With reference to literature and two illustrative examples of intercultural education initiatives in Mexico and Tanzania, we present an original conceptual framework for assessing indigenous participation in intercultural education. This incorporates a new ladder of participation depth (in relation to both curriculum content and decision making) alongside separate considerations of breadth, i.e., stakeholder diversity, and scope, i.e., the number of key project stages in which certain stakeholder groups are participating. The framework can be used to compare intercultural education initiatives in differing contexts and might be adaptable to other intercultural work.
... Third, knowledge integration has social justice implications such as affirming the autonomy, sovereignty, and identity of indigenous communities. Intercultural education has been claimed to improve the equity of relations between indigenous and dominant societies; to reduce prejudice and stereotyping; to strengthen democracy; and to assist nonindigenous actors to accept social and environmental responsibilities (Agrawal 1995, Aikman 1997, Gundara 2000, Murphy-Graham 2007, Honeyman 2010). Intercultural education is not merely the process of learning about indigenous societies while reinforcing discourses of traditionality, e.g., by writing about the respective societies in the past tense, implying homogeneity of culture, and perpetuating racist stereotypes (Campbell and Marshall 2003, Ninnes 2000). ...
Article
Full-text available
Intercultural education seeks to create a forum for integrating Western scientific knowledge and indigenous knowledge to address local and global challenges such as biocultural diversity conservation, natural resource management, and social justice for indigenous peoples. Intercultural education is based on learning together with, rather than learning about or from, indigenous communities. In the best examples, problem-based learning dissolves the dichotomy between indigenous and nonindigenous, resulting in full partnerships in which participants share expertise to meet mutual needs. With reference to literature and two illustrative examples of intercultural education initiatives in Mexico and Tanzania, we present an original conceptual framework for assessing indigenous participation in intercultural education. This incorporates a new ladder of participation depth (in relation to both curriculum content and decision making) alongside separate considerations of breadth, i.e., stakeholder diversity, and scope, i.e., the number of key project stages in which certain stakeholder groups are participating. The framework can be used to compare intercultural education initiatives in differing contexts and might be adaptable to other intercultural work.
... While a few studies have examined the academic results of SAT (see for example, Pineda et al., 2001), and some other aspects of the program such as its impact on women's empowerment (see Murphy-Graham, 2007, 2008, SAT's reputation for cultivating social responsibility had not been systematically studied before this research. Although ideally a study of program effects would be longitudinal and possibly even involve random selection of students to be assigned to each program, such a design was not practically feasible for a background study such as this one. ...
Article
Incl. tables, graphs, abstract, bibl. This article extends understanding of the connections between education, social capital, and development through a mixed-methods case study of the Sistema de Aprendizaje Tutorial, or SAT1, an innovative secondary-level education system. The quantitative dimension of the research used survey measures of social responsibility to compare 93 SAT students to 88 other students in conventional Honduran schools, with samples based on the naturally occurring (non-random) presence of one of these two different educational programs in each of nine nearby Honduran communities. Preliminary findings suggest that students in the SAT program held a greater sense of social responsibility than their peers in conventional schools. Students' statements about their own educational experiences were analyzed in order to identify some of the characteristics of the SAT program that may have led to this difference. The SAT approach to developing social responsibility is contrasted to a human rights focused approach.
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Governments in sub-Saharan Africa face increasing pressure to educate young people through secondary school, supposedly equipping them with knowledge and skills for employment and their future. At the same time, many youths do not complete their education and there are insufficient jobs to employ graduates. The development community sees entrepreneurship education as one viable solution to the double edged problem of inadequate education and few jobs. But while entrepreneurship education is aligned with a governing rationality of neoliberalism that requires individuals to create their own livelihoods without government social supports, the two NGO programs discussed in this book draw on a rights-based discourse that seeks to educate those not served by government schools, providing them with educational and social supports to be included in society. The chapters explore the tensions that occur when international organizations and NGOs draw on both neoliberal and liberal human rights discourses to address the problems of poverty, unemployment and poor quality education. Furthermore, when these neo/liberal perspectives meet local ideas of reciprocity and solidarity, they create friction and alter the programs and effects they have on youth. The book introduces the concept of entrepreneurial citizens-those who utilize their innovative skills and behaviors to claim both economic and social rights from which they had been previously excluded. The programs taught youth how to develop their own enterprises, to earn profits, and to save for their own futures; but youth used their education, skills and labor to provide for basic needs, to be included in society, and to support their and their families' well-being. By showing the contradictory effects of entrepreneurship education programs, the book asks international agencies and governments to consider how they can go beyond technical approaches of creating enterprises and increasing income, and head toward approaches that consider the kinds of labor that young people and communities value for their wellbeing. This book will be of interest to scholars and practitioners of education and international development, youth studies, African Studies and entrepreneurship/social entrepreneurship education.
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Juanita was seventeen years old and pregnant with her first child when she began an activity that would "open" her mind. Living in a remote Garifuna village in Honduras, Juanita had dropped out of school after the sixth grade. In 1996, a new educational program, Sistema de Aprendizaje Tutorial (Tutorial Learning System or SAT), was started in her community. The program helped her see the world differently and open a small business. Empowering women through education has become a top priority of international development efforts. Erin MurphyGraham draws on more than a decade of qualitative research to examine the experiences of Juanita and eighteen other women who participated in the SAT program. Their narratives suggest the simple yet subtle ways education can spark the empowerment process, as well as the role of men and boys in promoting gender equality. Drawing on indepth interviews and classroom observation in Honduras and Uganda, MurphyGraham shows the potential of the SAT program to empower women through expanded access and improved quality of secondary education in Latin America and Africa. An appendix provides samples of the classroom lessons.
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This article describes and analyzes how rural Nicaraguan teachers and NGO leaders are working with a US university-based team to develop a locally responsive, critical, and inquiry-based approach to the Ministry of Education requirement for English in secondary school. This requirement has placed a new and challenging expectation upon rural teachers, many of whom do not have basic English proficiency. Through macro level comparative analysis of language situations in different countries, coupled with meso and micro level analysis of authentic uses of English in their communities, the teachers and their US partners are shifting assumptions in multiple ways: from assuming that rural teachers need to be foreign language experts to re-envisioning teachers as co-explorers of languages together with their students; from assuming that Nicaragua has uniform needs for English to recognizing regional variation in the need for English; from assuming the availability of urban language learning tools and technologies to valuing and using rural resources that are locally available; and from reliance on so-called “foreign experts” to supporting community-based Nicaraguan teachers as leaders. Taken together, these shifts inform an emerging approach that supports teachers to move away from passive acceptance of language education policy and toward a more engaged, critical, and practical stance toward the introduction of English into the curriculum.
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While previous research has focused on the relationship between education and women's empowerment in the public sphere, their empowerment in the private sphere has been less fully developed in empirical studies. Drawing on a theoretical model of change in marital relationships, this article examines how women who participated in an innovative secondary education program in rural Honduran Garifuna communities were able to negotiate more equitable roles in their intimate relationships.
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ABSTRACT In this paper the primary emphasis is upon the general and common elements in contemporary, international education policy, but nonetheless the discussion also considers the processes of translation and recontextualisation involved in the realisation or enactment of policy in specific national and local settings. A set of generic 'problems' which constitute the contemporary social, political and economic conditions for education and social policy making are adumbrated. The emergence of ideological and 'magical' solutions to these problems is identified and the means of the dissemination of these solutions are discussed. A relationship between the global market and the marketisation of education is suggested and explored.
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Contenido: 1. Un modelo para el diseño de la investigación cualitativa; 2. Metas: ¿para qué está haciendo este estudio?; 3. Marco conceptual: ¿qué cree que sucede?; 4. Preguntas de investigación: ¿qué desea comprender?; 5. Métodos: ¿qué va a hacer en realidad?; 6. Validez: ¿cómo podría equivocarse?; 7. Propósitos de la investigación: presentación y justificación de un estudio cualitativo. Apéndice: ejemplo de una propuesta cualitativa.
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Acknowledgments August Burns, a writer and consultant, produced a report for YouthNet based on a literature review and interviews in Uganda. She has worked ,with adolescents in a youth-friendly clinic setting for more,than 25 years and has taught classes on adoles- cent reproductive ,health at Tulane ,University and ,the University of Vermont. YouthNet writers Claudia Daileader Ruland and William Finger contributed addi- tional research and writing to the final paper. Others developed three of the case studies. Erin Murphy-Graham, who helped eval- uate the Sistema de Aprendizaje Tutorial (SAT) program in Honduras, wrote the case study on that program. Rosemary McCarney, the executive director for Street Kids International (SKI), authored the case study on the Youth Enterprise Skills Initiative, based on the ,work of SKI in Zambia. Veronica Torres and Jamie Schnurr assisted McCarney with this case study. Jane Schueller of YouthNet wrote the case study on the Interactive Radio Instruction Program in Zambia, a project with which YouthNet has worked. Special thanks to those who reviewed all or portions of this paper: JoAnn Lewis, Hally Mahler, Julia Masterson, Ed Scholl, Jane Schueller, Gary Svenson, and Nancy Williamson from Family Health International (FHI)/YouthNet; Shanti Conly and Pamela,Mandel ,from ,the U.S. Agency ,for International ,Development (USAID)/Global Bureau; and the following: Susan Adamchak, a consultant to FHI; Gary Barker from ,Instituto Promundo; Annabel Erulkar from ,the Population
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As we enter the 1990s, scholars and practitioners of development administration in the Third World share a deep concern with its disappointing performance. Looked to as the primary agent of modernization during the optimistic first days of independence, many now blame it for the development stagnation of much of the Third World over the past two decades. Reinforced by the events of 1989 in Eastern Europe, calls for privatization and radical cutbacks in the state are increasing. Indeed, while the causes of Third World development stagnation are undoubtedly multiple and diverse, it is difficult to refute the charge that the hierarchical, bureaucratic, centrally-led strategy has not achieved what was expected of it. The question which faces responsible and concerned scholars, practitioners and officials today, is what can and should be done about all this? This paper recommends avoiding grand and precipitous changes in organizational strategies: indiscriminate privatization and dismantling the state, it argues, would be just as much an error as the earlier whole-cloth commitment to centralist-bureaucratic organization. Instead it argues that theoretical and analytical tools effective in making more subtle and refined choices among institutional alternatives must be developed. It presents a preliminary analysis of one strategy which might offer this, and illustrates how it can be used to design organizations more likely successfully to deliver services and sustain investments in the Third World.
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This paper begins from the understanding that women's empowerment is about the process by which those who have been denied the ability to make strategic life choices acquire such an ability. A wide gap separates this processual understanding of empowerment from the more instrumentalist forms of advocacy which have required the measurement and quantification of empowerment. The ability to exercise choice incorporates three inter-related dimensions: resources (defined broadly to include not only access, but also future claims, to both material and human and social resources); agency (including processes of decision making, as well as less measurable manifestations of agency such as negotiation, deception and manipulation); and achievements (well-being outcomes). A number of studies of women's empowerment are analysed to make some important methodological points about the measurement of empowerment. The paper argues that these three dimensions of choice are indivisible in determining the meaning of an indicator and hence its validity as a measure of empowerment. The notion of choice is further qualified by referring to the conditions of choice, its content and consequences. These qualifications represent an attempt to incorporate the structural parameters of individual choice in the analysis of women's empowerment.
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Thesis (Ed.D.)--Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2005. Vita. Includes bibliographical references: leaves 227-233.
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This study is designed to help practitioners prepare and evaluate institutional reforms for education and health programs. It provides an analytic framework for use by public officials and researchers, with case studies that illustrate a wide range of actual practice, and a set of lessons learned. The framework uses the concept of "accountability" to link the broad goals of reform to the key dimensions of organizational arrangements. The case studies, based on fieldwork in Mexico and Nicaragua, demonstrate a wide variety of available policy instruments.
Education for democracy Harvard Review of Latin America. Fall. Retrieved 14 May 2007 from <http://drclas.fas.harvard.edu/revista/articles/view/173&gt
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Nicaragua all have SAT groups. Besides Colombia, Honduras has the largest number of students enrolled in SAT
  • Honduras
  • Guatemala
Honduras, Guatemala and Nicaragua all have SAT groups. Besides Colombia, Honduras has the largest number of students enrolled in SAT (approximately 5,500).
Community participation in school management in developing countries: who participates and how? Cambridge, MA: Harvard Graduate School of Education
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The unit cost in Honduras is approximately US $1.50. R e f e r e n c e s a nd b i b l i o g r a p h y Alzate A.; Arbab A.; Varcarcel F. 2000. Servicio a la Comunidad Unidad 1: salud, un aspecto de bienestar [Community Service Unit 1: health, an aspect of well-being]
  • Textbooks Are
Textbooks are softbound, black and white booklets of roughly 100 pages each. The unit cost in Honduras is approximately US $1.50. R e f e r e n c e s a nd b i b l i o g r a p h y Alzate A.; Arbab A.; Varcarcel F. 2000. Servicio a la Comunidad Unidad 1: salud, un aspecto de bienestar [Community Service Unit 1: health, an aspect of well-being]. Cali, Colombia: FUNDAEC. [Adapted version published by Asociació Bayan, Honduras.].
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Estudio de factibilidad para la posible adaptación del Programa Sistema de Aprendizaje Tutorial (SAT) a Nicaragua [Feasibility study for the possible adaptation of the Sistema de Aprendizaje Tutorial (SAT) Programme to Nicaragua
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Informe sobre la evaluación del Programa SAT
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An orientation toward human progress: developing social responsibility in rural Honduran youth through the Sistema de Aprendizaje Tutorial
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Summary of findings: decentralization and effective citizen participation: six cautionary tales
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FUNDAEC: its principles and activities
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Racial isolation, poverty and the limits of local control as a means for holding public schools accountable. In Motion Magazine
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Sistema de Aprendizaje Tutorial: experiencia innovadora de educación rural en Colombia [System of Tutorial Learning: innovative experience in Colombian rural education]. (Document prepared for the Presentation to the Ministry of Education of Colombia for SECAB
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Servicio a la Comunidad Unidad 1: salud, un aspecto de bienestar [Community Service Unit 1: health, an aspect of well-being]. Cali, Colombia: FUNDAEC. [Adapted version published by Asociación
  • Alzate A Arbab
  • A Varcarcel
Education for democracy
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Decentralization in education: Q&A for the web/knowledge nugget. Decentralization and School-Based Management Resource Kit
  • V Paqueo
  • J Lammert
  • V. Paqueo
Servicio a la Comunidad Unidad 1: salud, un aspecto de bienestar [Community Service Unit 1: health, an aspect of well-being
  • A Alzate
  • A Arbab
  • F Varcarcel
Alzate A.; Arbab A.; Varcarcel F. 2000. Servicio a la Comunidad Unidad 1: salud, un aspecto de bienestar [Community Service Unit 1: health, an aspect of well-being]. Cali, Colombia: FUNDAEC. [Adapted version published by Asociación Bayan, Honduras.].
Reaching out-of-school youth with reproductive health and HIV information and services
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Home advantage: social class and parental intervention in elementary education
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Decentralizaion of education: why, when, what and how
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Who participates in school councils and how? Prospects
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