Article

Angelicae Gigantis Radix regulates mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation in vivo and in vitro

Department of Anatomy, College of Oriental Medicine, Institute of Oriental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association (Impact Factor: 2.9). 06/2012; 50(9):2987-95. DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2012.06.001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Angelicae Gigantis (AG) Radix, commonly used medicinal food, has been reported as a promising candidate for inflammatory diseases. However, the anti-allergic effects of AG and its molecular mechanisms have yet to be clarified. The present study investigated the anti-allergy effects of ethanol extracts of AG on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation in vivo and in vitro. The finding of this study demonstrated that AG reduced anti-dinitrophenyl IgE antibody-induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, compound 48/80-induced histamine release, 2,4-dinitrofluoro benzene-induced contact hypersensitivity. In addition, AG inhibited the production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, as well as the activation of Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factor-κB in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells. In conclusion, our results provide a novel insight into the pharmacological actions of AG as a potential candidate for use in allergic inflammatory diseases.

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    • "Menthae herbam, a component of soyo-san modified prescription on plasma metabolomics of rats with chronic immobilization stress [51]. Angelicae gigantis radix, a component of soyo-san, exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect in vitro, in vivo and inhibits the stress-induced pathophysiological changes in the central nervous system [52]. Also, paeoniflorin has neuroprotective effect and inhibition of neuroinflammation [53]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Soyo-san is a traditional oriental medicinal formula, a mixture of 9 crude drugs, and it has been clinically used for treating mild depressive disorders. The role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in psychiatric disorders has been the focus of great research attention in recent years. In the present study, we detected the antidepressant effect of soyo-san in the ovariectomized and repeated stressed female rats. Methods This study was designed to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of soyo-san on the forced swimming test (FST). The rats were randomly divided into the following groups: the nonoperated and nonstressed group (non-op), the nonoperated and stressed group (non-op + ST), the ovariectomized and stress group (OVX) and sham operated and stressed group (sham), the ovariectomized and stressed group (OVX + ST), the ovariectomized, stressed and soyo-san 100 mg/kg treated group (SOY100) and the ovariectomized, stressed and soyo-san 400 mg/kg treated group (SOY400). The rats were exposed to immobilization stress (IMO) for 14day (2 h/14day), and soyo-san (100 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) was administrated during the same time. In the same animals, the levels of corticosterone and interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β) were examined in the serum. Also, the change of IL-1β expression in brain regions was examined after behavior test. Results In the FST, the lower dose (100 mg/kg) of extract was effective in reducing immobility, along with an increase in swimming time. The serum levels of corticosterone and IL-1β in the SOY groups were significantly lower than those in the control group. In the brain, the expression of IL-1β positive neurons in the control group were significantly increased in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and hippocampus compared to the non-op. However, soyo-san groups significantly reduced the IL-1β-ir neurons in the PVN and hippocampal regions compared to the control. Conclusion The present results demonstrated that soyo-san effectively reduced behavioral and patho-physiological depression-like responses. Trial registration: Our results suggest that soyo-san may be useful for immune regulator in repeated stress-induced ovariectomized female rats.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Soyo-san is a traditional oriental medicinal formula, a mixture of 9 crude drugs, and it has been clinically used for treating mild depressive disorders. The role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in psychiatric disorders has been the focus of great research attention in recent years. In the present study, we detected the antidepressant effect of soyo-san in the ovariectomized and repeated stressed female rats. This study was designed to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of soyo-san on the forced swimming test (FST). The rats were randomly divided into the following groups: the nonoperated and nonstressed group (non-op), the nonoperated and stressed group (non-op + ST), the ovariectomized and stress group (OVX) and sham operated and stressed group (sham), the ovariectomized and stressed group (OVX + ST), the ovariectomized, stressed and soyo-san 100 mg/kg treated group (SOY100) and the ovariectomized, stressed and soyo-san 400 mg/kg treated group (SOY400). The rats were exposed to immobilization stress (IMO) for 14day (2 h/14day), and soyo-san (100 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) was administrated during the same time. In the same animals, the levels of corticosterone and interleukin-1-beta (IL-1beta) were examined in the serum. Also, the change of IL-1beta expression in brain regions was examined after behavior test. In the FST, the lower dose (100 mg/kg) of extract was effective in reducing immobility, along with an increase in swimming time. The serum levels of corticosterone and IL-1beta in the SOY groups were significantly lower than that in the control group. In the brain, the expression of IL-1beta positive neurons in the control group significantly increased in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and hippocampus compared to the non-op. However, soyo-san groups significantly reduced the IL-1beta-ir neurons in the PVN and hippocampal regions compared to the control. The present results demonstrated that soyo-san effectively reduced behavioral and patho-physiological depression-like responses. Trial registration: Our results suggest that soyo-san may be useful for an immune promoter in repeated stress-induced ovariectomized female rats.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Jaeumganghwa-tang (JGT, Zi-yin-jiang-huo-tang in Chinese and Jiin-koka-to in Japanese) is an oriental herbal formula that has long been used as a traditional medicine to treat respiratory and kidney diseases. Recent studies revealed that JGT exhibited potent inhibitory effects on allergies, inflammation, pain, convulsions, and prostate hyperplasia. Several constituent herbs in JGT induce apoptotic cancer cell death. However, the anti-cancer activity of JGT has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of JGT using highly tumorigenic HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. In addition, we examined whether the Lactobacillus fermentation of JGT enhanced its anti-cancer activity using an in vivo xenograft model because fermentation of herbal extracts is thought to strengthen their therapeutic effects. Data revealed that JGT suppressed the growth of cancer cells efficiently by stimulating G1 cell cycle arrest and then inducing apoptotic cell death by causing mitochondrial damage and activating caspases. The phosphorylation of p38 and ERK also played a role in JGT-induced cell death. In vitro experiments demonstrated that JGT fermented with Lactobacillus acidophilus, designated fJGT162, elicited similar patterns of cell death as did non-fermented JGT. Meanwhile, the daily oral administration of 120 mg/kg fJGT162 to HT1080-bearing BALB/c nude mice suppressed tumor growth dramatically (up to 90%) compared with saline treatment, whereas the administration of non-fermented JGT suppressed tumor growth by ~70%. Collectively, these results suggest that JGT and fJGT162 are safe and useful complementary and alternative anti-cancer herbal therapies, and that Lactobacillus fermentation improves the in vivo anti-cancer efficacy of JGT significantly.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · PLoS ONE
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