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Probable long distance dispersal of Leptinella plumosa Hook.f. to Heard Island: Habitat, status and discussion of its arrival

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During the 2003–2004 austral summer the number of vascular plant species recorded from Heard Island rose from 11 to 12 with the discovery of one small plant of Leptinella plumosa Hook.f. (Asteraceae), an indigenous subantarctic species. It is described and its habitat, likely status and possible means of arrival on the island are discussed. We conclude that the species probably arrived by natural means with a seabird as its most likely dispersal vector. The life history and biology of L. plumosa indicates its likely persistence on Heard Island.
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... Only a single alien plant species is known (Poa annua, Scott and Kirkpatrick, 2005). No other introduced plants, invertebrates or vertebrates are currently documented from the island with sufficient evidence to consider them as either introduced or more than transient (Bergstrom et al., 2006;Green and Woehler, 2006;Turner et al., 2006). The island's climate is also changing rapidly, as indicated by the limited climate record and the rapid retreat of its glaciers (Thost and Truffer, 2008). ...
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... See Spence (1990), Given (1969Given ( , 1984 (Drury 1972, Breitwieser andWard 1993). Wind dispersed (Johnson 2001 (Lloyd 1972) attachment (Ridley 1930, Turner et al. 2006 (Ward 1982(Ward , 1993. See Spence (1990) wind Asteraceae ...
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