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The School-to-Work Transition for High School Dropouts

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This paper presents a conceptual framework for understanding the problems encountered by high school dropouts in their school-to-work transition. The underlying assumption is that dropouts are likely to face strains in their homes, jobs, and other community settings that are similar to those which led them to leave school. Exemplary school and work programs for dropouts are discussed and implications drawn for their design. A youth advocacy system is recommended that could stimulate adaptation by the educational and employment sectors to the needs and personal styles of dropouts as well as help dropouts to make informed choices about their educational and career potentials. Such a system would also help the dropout to identify the most appropriate settings for realizing those potentials.
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... nosu na svoje vršnjake koji su stekli diplomu. Jedna od glavnih poteškoća mladih koji nisu završili srednju školu u tranziciji škola -posao jest njihova nesposobnost da se uspješno snađu na tržištu rada te pronađu zaposlenje koje bi im donijelo dostatne resurse za normalan život (Christenson i Thurlow, 2004.;Eurostat, 2009.;Rumberger i Lamb, 2003.;Weidman i Friedman, 1984.;Whalter i Plug, 2006.). Rano odustajanje od školovanja te nezavršavanje srednje škole stavlja mlade ljude u nepovoljan položaj na tržištu rada, jer u današnje vrijeme mnogi poslovi zahtijevaju specifične vještine i znanja koja oni nisu imali prilike steći (Chisholm, 2006.). Tranzicijski period iz škole na posao može biti dobar pokazatelj ...
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The aim of the present study was to determine whether the set of individual and family characteristics discriminates between employed and unemployed young adults without high school, and which of these characteristics contribute most to the discrimination between groups The sample comprised youth without high school diploma (school dropouts) from 14 cities in the Republic of Croatia Data on individual (school competence, behavior in school, and employment status) and family (parents' education level, frequency of contacts with parents, and the living standard of family) characteristics of school dropouts were collected The results of the study confirm the initial expectation about higher school achievement, higher living standard of the family, and higher educated parents of employed school dropouts in comparison to unemployed school dropouts Based on the set of individual and family characteristics it is possible to discriminate between employed and unemployed school dropouts, whereby the mother's education level and the living standard of family contribute most to the discrimination between groups
... nosu na svoje vršnjake koji su stekli diplomu. Jedna od glavnih poteškoća mladih koji nisu završili srednju školu u tranziciji škola -posao jest njihova nesposobnost da se uspješno snađu na tržištu rada te pronađu zaposlenje koje bi im donijelo dostatne resurse za normalan život (Christenson i Thurlow, 2004.;Eurostat, 2009.;Rumberger i Lamb, 2003.;Weidman i Friedman, 1984.;Whalter i Plug, 2006.). Rano odustajanje od školovanja te nezavršavanje srednje škole stavlja mlade ljude u nepovoljan položaj na tržištu rada, jer u današnje vrijeme mnogi poslovi zahtijevaju specifične vještine i znanja koja oni nisu imali prilike steći (Chisholm, 2006.). Tranzicijski period iz škole na posao može biti dobar pokazatelj ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the present study was to determine whether the set of individual and family characteristics discriminates between employed and unemployed young adults without high school, and which of these characteristics contribute most to the discrimination between groups. The sample comprised youth without high school diploma (school dropouts) from 14 cities in the Republic of Croatia. Data on individual (school competence, behavior in school, and employment status) and family (parents' education level, frequency of contacts with parents, and the living standard of family) characteristics of school dropouts were collected. The results of the study confirm the initial expectation about higher school achievement, higher living standard of the family, and higher educated parents of employed school dropouts in comparison to unemployed school dropouts. Based on the set of individual and family characteristics it is possible to discriminate between employed and unemployed school dropouts, whereby the mother's education level and the living standard of family contribute most to the discrimination between groups.
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