Article

Fluoxetine-Associated Remission of Ego-Dystonic Male Homosexuality

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Abstract

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been reported to decrease sexual activity across a broad diagnostic spectrum in men and women. We present a serendipitous finding of fluoxetine-associated suppression of ego-dystonic homosexual activity in a fifty-three year old male for a period of thirteen years thus far. His determination to remain sexually abstinent has been key in his successful treatment.

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... A serendipitous finding of fluoxetine-associated suppression of ego-dystonic homosexual activity in a 53-year-old man for a period of 13 years was reported by Elmore (2002). The patient's determination to remain sexually abstinent had been essential to his successful treatment. ...
... A serendipitous finding of fluoxetine-associated suppression of ego-dystonic homosexual activity in a 53-year-old man for a period of 13 years was reported by Elmore (2002). The patient's determination to remain sexually abstinent had been essential to his successful treatment. ...
... " Acute homosexuality panic " was first described by Kempf in 1920 as a psychosis that resulted from the pressure of uncontrollable " sexual cravings " that occurred when men or women were grouped alone for prolonged periods. This concept is no longer used to understand psychotic disorders; however, homosexuality fears have since been documented in people with schizophrenia, panic disorder, and other disorders (Keller and Foa, 1978; Rudden, Busch, and Milrod, 2003; Elmore, 2002). Homosexuality anxiety has also been recognized as a symptom of OCD, and it is referred to in this chapter as " HOCD. ...
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