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School-Based Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Programming: Current Perspectives

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Abstract

In 1994, the Fetzer Institute hosted a conference to address concerns about the various, disjointed school-based efforts that had surfaced over the years. In attendance were a range of researchers, educators, and advocates with diverse interests related to meeting the developmental, psychological, educational, and general health needs of children. These issues were discussed, and the term social and emotional learning (SEL) was introduced. SEL described a framework for providing opportunities for young people to acquire the skills necessary for attaining and maintaining personal well-being and positive relationships across the lifespan. Out of this 1994 meeting, the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) was formed with the goal of “establishing high-quality, evidence-based SEL as an essential part of preschool through high school education” (Elias et al., 1997; Greenberg et al., 2003; Kress & Elias, 2006).
... Rosenthal and Gatt (2010) and Hemmeter et al. (2008) emphasized the importance of experiential preservice training. Elbertson, Brackett, and Weissberg (2010) highlighted effective SEL training as providing information to in-service educators continuously, taking the form of preimplementation training, user-friendly manuals, and ongoing communication between teachers and program personnel. It would be helpful for principals to receive more preparation and training regarding the roles and responsibilities of school counselors in order to aid them in better supporting school counselors to address mental health in schools Lowery, Quick, Boyland, Geesa, & Mayes, 2018). ...
... Much of the research on effective SEL training pinpoint the importance of a comprehensive approach (Bencivenga & Elias, 2003;Elbertson et al., 2010). Elbertson et al. (2010) asserted how the effectiveness of a SEL program often depends upon continuity throughout schooling (e.g., K-12), and collaboration of several individuals, from teachers to school leaders, to parents and students themselves. ...
... Much of the research on effective SEL training pinpoint the importance of a comprehensive approach (Bencivenga & Elias, 2003;Elbertson et al., 2010). Elbertson et al. (2010) asserted how the effectiveness of a SEL program often depends upon continuity throughout schooling (e.g., K-12), and collaboration of several individuals, from teachers to school leaders, to parents and students themselves. Further, Bencivenga and Elias (2003) detailed characteristics of visionary social-emotional leadership, a couple of these being: supporting and empowering teachers, distributing leadership roles, and actively welcoming parents and the community into schools, among other goals. ...
Chapter
Studies report that most children with mental health disorders do not receive the adequate amount and type of mental health care and support they should receive to effectively guide growth and development. Often, schools are one of the only places where students and their families can receive mental health care, though unfortunately, many school leaders do not receive sufficient training to support students in their mental health needs. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to present an overview of essential knowledge and skills necessary for principals and school counselors to develop collaborative relationships that better position them to support the mental health of P-12 students. The discussion is framed through the lens of relational leadership theory and highlights how the school counselor and principal roles are effectively operationalized within a collaborative, multitiered system of supports. Finally, how to move forward with collaborative pre- and in-service mental health training for principals and school counselors is discussed.
... Historically ignored due to the myopic focus on academic instruction and achievement (Elbertson et al., 2010), SEL continues to (re)emerge as an important lever for youth development. The continuous emphasis on SEL within the school context is likely due to the understanding that the development of SEL skills contributes to the holistic wellbeing of youth, including a positive influence on academics (Elbertson et al., 2010). ...
... Historically ignored due to the myopic focus on academic instruction and achievement (Elbertson et al., 2010), SEL continues to (re)emerge as an important lever for youth development. The continuous emphasis on SEL within the school context is likely due to the understanding that the development of SEL skills contributes to the holistic wellbeing of youth, including a positive influence on academics (Elbertson et al., 2010). Defined more than two decades ago by the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), SEL is the "process through which children and adults understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions" ("What is SEL?", n.d.). ...
... Therefore, educators must understand how to best execute such programs to ensure successful promotion of SEL skills for youth (Payton et al., 2000). Key components of successful youth SEL programs in educational settings are the design, coordination, educator preparation and support, and evaluation (Elbertson et al., 2010;Payton et al., 2000). Program design encompasses a clarity in rationale for the program, quality SEL lesson plans, and the promotion of an effective teaching strategy. ...
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This empirical study describes a youth-led participatory action research project that engaged a majority Black student population facing adverse childhood experiences, including economic inequities, within their Florida communities. In 2019, one Orange County Boys & Girls Club (B&GC) surveyed its 1,400 members to assess their overall club experience. The needs assessment indicated that club members, ages 9–12 years old, reported more challenges than other age groups relating to emotional safety, physical safety, impulse control, teamwork, and conflict resolution. The B&GC director requested university partners to collaborate with older club leaders, ages 15–19 years old, to develop a means of addressing such concerns. Project results were two-fold: (a) the development of an innovative social and emotional curriculum consisting of skill-building and digital-storytelling for younger youth members, and (b) the elevation of voices and experiences of multiply-marginalized youth to spark club transformation through intergenerational mentoring.
... Social competence is very important for the individual, as it is a major determinant of success in preschool, school and even in adult communities [7]; [16]; [17]. Nowadays, in addition to sedentary lifestyles, other interpersonal problems are also common among young people [1]; [5]; [8]; [9]; [15]; [16]; [18]. Social skills are behavioral tools and learned psychic components that help shape an individual's social behavior [12]; [17]. ...
... Research in the field dates back to the 1960s, when White's [19] study established the concept and importance of social competence, which is still a popular research area today [12]; [17]. Today, the most active disciplines in social competence research are pedagogy, social psychology, and psychology [5]; [12]. The increased interest may be due to the complexity of the concept, as all three disciplines have an impact on competence, of which social competence is an integral part. ...
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The emerging generation is undergoing several changes in their cultural habits, values, and attitudes, and are very different from their peers. The trend shows that young people, young adults, and even parents are spending more and more time online and at the same time are using social media platforms more and more. In addition to its many benefits, media socialization has also brought with it many dangers and problems.
... Understanding socio-emotional competencies requires the analysis of different models of emotional intelligence. Some of these address intra-personal aspects such as recognizing, understanding, and dealing with emotions [4]; others also include the social dimension of emotion and its interpersonal perspective, which integrates aspects such as empathy and social abilities [6], competencies for dealing with life challenges [7,8], and managing interpersonal relationships and learning to take adequate decisions [9]. Experts agree, however, that the development of emotional competencies is the best path to improve emotional intelligence [10,11]. ...
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Socio-emotional competencies play an essential role in personal development as they are associated with highly prosocial behavior and low aggressiveness. An individual who is online manages his/her emotions in a specific manner. Thus, it is highly relevant to analyze and evaluate online socio-emotional competencies. Until now, however, no instruments had been defined or developed for that purpose. This study’s objective was thus to design and validate a questionnaire for the evaluation of socio-emotional competencies in virtual contexts, and to analyze eventual differences according to gender and academic year. Using the model developed by Bisquerra and Pérez (2007) as a theoretical framework, the competencies posited therein were transferred to an online environment. The questionnaire was filled out by 888 adolescents ages 12 to 17 (48% males, M = 13.83 years old, DT = 1.27), all residents of Aragón, Spain. On the basis of their responses, structure analysis, validation, and reliability were carried out. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) yielded a five-dimensional structure with good fit and internal consistency. The five resulting dimensions evaluate (1) emotional e-conscience, (2) emotional e-autonomy, (3) emotional e-regulation, (4) e-self-control of impulsiveness, and (5) social e-competency. Differences among genders were observed in the categories of emotional e-conscience and social e-competency. Furthermore, the results of this study show that online emotional expression does not imply emotional competency. These results represent an advance in the field of emotional education.
... In this conference, targets were set to the students in terms of needs of education, psychology, and health. And this process provides occurrence of SEL (Elbertson, Brackett and Weissberg, 2010;Totan 2011). This group has started working with the aim of solving exclusive problems and behavioral problems, imroving protective programmes which enable increasing of academic achievement Baydan 2010). ...
... Nitekim sosyal-duygusal yeterlilikler ile akademik başarı arasında da doğrudan bir bağ bulunmakta; öğrencilerin akademik başarısının, öğrenciler, akranlar ve öğretmenler arasında iyi ve samimi ilişkilerin olduğu ve bireylerin aidiyet hissedebildikleri okullarda arttığı bilinmektedir. 39 Okul ruh sağlığı faaliyetlerinin sadece belli bir uzman gurubunu ilgilendiren bir mesele olduğu sıklıkla karşılaşılan bir yanılgı olmakla birlikte, öğretmenler ve ders süreçleri, okul ruh sağlığı faaliyetlerinin merkezinde olmalıdır. Nitekim Covid-19 sonrasında okullarda sunulacak ruh sağlığı faaliyetlerinin ders süreçlerine entegre edilmesi oldukça önemli bir rol oynayacaktır. ...
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