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A new species of Genus Triplophysa (Nemacheilinae: Balitoridae), Triplophysa longipectoralis sp. nov, from Guangxi, China

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A new species, Triplophysa longipectoralis, is described from Liujiang River, Guangxi, China. The new species is distinguished from other species of Triplophysa by the following combination of characters: pectoral fin highly developed, reaching beyond pelvic-fin origin; eyes present and vestigial; body covered with scales; dorsal and lateral sides of head and body mottled with blotches; dorsal fin emarginate; caudal fin forked; anus close to anal-fin origin. A key to all valid species of Triplophysa in Xijiang River water system is provided.
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A new species of Genus Triplophysa (Nemacheilinae:
Balitoridae), Triplophysa longipectoralis sp. nov,
from Guangxi, China
Lan-Ping Zheng &Li-Na Du &Xiao-Yong Chen &
Jun-Xing Yang
Received: 9 September 2008 / Accepted: 1 May 2009 / Published online: 22 May 2009
#Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009
Abstract A new species, Triplophysa longipectoralis,
is described from Liujiang River, Guangxi, China.
The new species is distinguished from other species
of Triplophysa by the following combination of
characters: pectoral fin highly developed, reaching
beyond pelvic-fin origin; eyes present and vestigial;
body covered with scales; dorsal and lateral sides of
head and body mottled with blotches; dorsal fin
emarginate; caudal fin forked; anus close to anal-fin
origin. A key to all valid species of Triplophysa in
Xijiang River water system is provided.
Keywords Balitoridae .Triplophysa .New species .
Guangxi .China
Introduction
The genus Triplophysa (Rendahl) belongs to the
family Balitoridae, subfamily Nemacheilinae, and is
one of the largest groups of subfamily Nemacheilinae.
There are 112 nominal species in the genus Trip-
lophysa all over the world, and approximately 60% of
species are found in China (Chen and Yang 2005;
Froese and Pauly 2008). The genus Triplophysa is
distinct from other genera by the character combina-
tion: nostrils close together; back wall of lateral bony
bladder capsule bony and sexual dimorphism. Sexual
dimorphism is one important character of Triplophysa
in China. Males have a rectangular area of breeding
tubercles on each side of head, and their outer rays of
pectoral fin become hard and wide (Zhu 1989; Yang
1990; He et al. 2006).
Xijiang River water system is the largest water
system in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region.
Sixteen valid species of Triplophysa have been
previously recorded in Xijiang River. A new species
was collected from Liuijiang River, a main tributary
of Xijiang River, in Xunle town, Huanjiang County,
Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, and is
described herein.
Materials and methods
Counts and measurements follow Kottelat (1990).
Measurements were made with digital calipers and
recorded to 0.1 mm. Some other characteristics
selected are listed as follows: lateral head length is
from tip of snout to hindmost point of opercle. Gill
rakers refer to the count on the inner side of the first
arch. Specimens examined are deposited in the
collection of the Kunming Institute of Zoology
Environ Biol Fish (2009) 85:221227
DOI 10.1007/s10641-009-9485-4
Chen and Yang contributed equally to this paper.
L.-P. Zheng :L.-N. Du :X.-Y. Chen (*):J.-X. Yang (*)
Kunming Institute of Zoology,
the Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Kunming 650223, China
e-mail: chenxy@mail.kiz.ac.cn
J.-X. Yang
e-mail: yangjx@mail.kiz.ac.cn
(KIZ), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming and
the Institute of Zoology (IOZ), Chinese Academy of
Sciences, Beijing. Abbreviations used in the text are:
country=Co., examined specimen=ex., province=Prov.,
and standard length=SL.
Triplophysa longipectoralis sp. nov. (Figs. 1,2)
Holotype: KIZ2001004573, 52.1 mm SL, Liujiang
River Basin: Xunle town, Huanjiang County, Hechi
City, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China,
May 2001, collected by Mr. Lan Jiahu.
Paratypes: KIZ2001004574-576, KIZ2001004578-
4579, 5 ex., 36.852.2 mm SL; OIZ 177636, 1 ex.,
42.9 mm SL. Collected with the holotype.
Etymology: The specific epithet longipectoralis is
derived from the Latin longus (long) and pectoralis
(pectoral), alluding to the long pectoral fin. It is a
noun in apposition.
Diagnosis: Pectoral fin highly developed, reaching
beyond pelvic-fin origin; eyes present and vestigial;
body covered with scales; dorsal and lateral sides of
head and body mottled with blotches; dorsal fin
emarginate; caudal fin forked; anus close to anal-fin
origin. Counts and proportional measurements are
shown in Table 1.
Description: D III, 8; A III, 56; P I, 1011; V I, 7;
C 16; inner gill rakers 13; vertebrae 4+35 (1 specimen).
Cephalic lateral-line system with 2 + 2 supratemporal,
8 supraorbital, 3+ 9 infraorbital and 14 preoperculo-
mandibular pores.
Body elongate, body and caudal-peduncle com-
pressed, abdomen smooth. Highest point of body
usually in front of dorsal-fin origin. Head pointed
moderately compressed, width greater than depth.
Snout relatively pointed, snout length less than postor-
bital length. Anterior and posterior nostrils closely
situated, anterior nostrils in short tube, with elongate
barbel-like tip, reaching midpoint between snout and
anterior margin of eye. No valve around posterior
nostrils. Eyes small and vestigial. Orbital cavity
sunken, positioned dorsolaterally in head. Interorbital
space slightly convex. Mouth inferior. Posterior margin
of mouth situated below anterior nostrils. Lips thick
with strong furrows and papillae; anterior margin of
lower lip with a median notch, middle interrupted and
forming a pair of furrows. Upper jaw arched and with
weak processus dentiformis. Lower jaw arched, without
median notch. Three pairs of barbels, moderately long;
inner rostral barbels reaching corner of mouth; outer
rostral barbels the longest, extending beyond posterior
margin of eye; maxillary barbels reaching the mid point
between posterior margin of eye and posterior margin of
operculum. Barbels covered with papillae. Gill mem-
branes united with isthmus. Lower corner of operculum
reaching ventral insertion of pectoral-fin. Gill filament
with tiny branches, and gill rakers short, with tiny
protuberance. Lateral line complete.
Dorsal fin emarginate, its origin situated midway
between tip of snout and caudal-fin base; last
unbranched ray longest, slightly less than head length,
reaching to or nearly to vertical through anal-fin origin.
Anal fin emarginate. First branched anal-fin ray reach-
ing or close to caudal-fin base. First branched pectoral-
fin ray longest, reaching beyond pelvic-fin origin when
extending horizontally. Pelvic-fin origin slightly poste-
rior to dorsal-fin origin when extending horizontally.
Second branched pelvic-fin ray longest, reaching or
close to anus. Pelvic-fin origin situated midway
between pectoral-fin origin and anal-fin origin. Auxil-
iary pelvic lobe absent. Anus close to anal-fin origin,
equal to eye diameter. Caudal fin forked, upper lobe
slightly longer than lower lobe, tips pointed.
Scales embedded, covering body except head,
breast and belly. Cephalic lateral line canal developed.
Supraorbital and infraorbital canals extending hori-
zontally from ethmoid and base of outer rostral
barbels respectively, converging at posterior orbital
region and extending posteriorly, then converging
Fig. 1 Triplophysa longipectoralis KIZ2001004573, holotype,
52.1 mm SL, Liujiang River Basin: Xunle town, Huanjiang
County, Guangxi, China, Lateral view
Fig. 2 Triplophysa longipectoralis, living colour pattern
(photographed by Lan J.H.)
222 Environ Biol Fish (2009) 85:221227
with occipital canal on back of head, and uniting with
lateral line canal. Lateral line complete and straight.
Another lateral canal extending posteriorly from
posterior end of lower lip to midpoint of anterior
margin of operculum. Peritoneum without pigment.
Air-bladder wrapped in bony bladder capsule, lateral
opening large, no opening on back wall of air-bladder.
Males with rectangular area of breeding tubercles on
sides of head, not developed and extending from
anterior lower margin of orbital to base of outer
rostral barbels. Pectoral fin hardened.
Color pattern: Ground color of body light yellow,
slightly lighter ventrally. Dorsal and lateral parts of
body and head gray and black. Dorsal, pectoral,
pelvic and anal fin rays brown, fin membrane hyaline.
Blotches present on dorsal, pectoral and caudal fin.
Pelvic and anal fins without blotches (Figs. 1,2).
Ecology: Aquatic insects and copepods are found in
the stomach (1 specimen). Triplophysa longipectoralis
lives in the clear water in the cave, water temperature
below 20°C.
Distribution: Triplophysa longipectoralis is dis-
tributed in a cave in Xunle town, Huanjiang County,
Guangxi, belonging to Liujiang River (Fig. 3).
Discussion
Triplophysa longipectoralis can be distinguished from
all species of genus Triplophysa in China except
Characters Holotype (%) Range (%) Mean± SD (%)
In % of standard length (SL)
Dorsal head length 23.9 22.725.4 24.1± 0.8
Predorsal length (PDL) 49.8 49.053.1 50.4± 1.4
Preventral length 50.9 49.753.5 51.4± 1.3
Preanal length 76.3 53.578.3 73.3± 8.3
Preanus length 72 69.674.2 72.4± 1.4
Caudal-peduncle length (CPL) 13.8 12.215.8 13.9± 1.0
Caudal-peduncle depth (CPD) 9.9 6.89.9 8.4± 0.9
Body depth 15.2 12.216.4 14.5± 1.5
Head width (maximum) 14.5 13.015.6 14.3± 0.9
Head width (at eye) 8.6 7.38.6 8.2 ± 0.4
Length of dorsal fin 25.3 24.628.6 26.1± 1.2
Length of pectoral fin 28.8 25.730.0 28.3± 1.4
Length of pelvic fin 20.9 19.122.3 20.3± 1.1
Length of anal fin 22.6 17.922.6 21.1± 1.4
Length of caudal fin 26.3 26.328.4 27.3± 0.7
Length of median caudal ray 19.3 16.323.0 20.7± 2.2
In % of dorsal head length
Snout length 47.7 44.149.1 46.8± 1.9
Eye diameter (ED) 11.8 11.816.4 14.5± 1.6
Interorbital width 22.8 21.225.3 23.4± 1.5
Head width (maximum) 60.5 54.766.1 59.4± 3.6
Head width (at eye) 36.1 31.337.6 33.9±2.0
Head height (at eye) 35.5 32.037.4 33.7±1.9
In % of lateral head length (HL)
Snout length 39.4 36.441.5 38.8± 1.8
Eye diameter (ED) 9.7 9.713.7 12.0± 1.2
Interorbital width 18.8 17.221.3 19.4± 1.4
Caudal-peduncle depth/ length 71.7 49.873.1 60.7± 8.7
Table 1 Main morphometric
characters of Triplophysa
longipectoralis
Environ Biol Fish (2009) 85:221227 223
T. xiangxiensis by pectoral fin highly developed,
reaching beyond pelvic-fin origin. But T. longipectoralis
can be further distinguished from T. xiangxiensis
by the following characters: pectoral fin extend
beyonding pelvic-fin origin (vs. reaching midpoint of
anal-fin base in T. xiangxiensis); scaled (vs. scaleless
in T. xiangxiensis); eyes present (vs. absent in
T. xiangxiensis); body covered with blotches (vs. no
blotches in T. xiangxiensis).
In Xijiang River, 16 valid nemacheiline loaches
have been already described (Table 2) (Chu and Chen
1979; Zhu and Guo 1985; Zhu and Cao 1988; Yang
and Chu 1990; Yang 1990; Chen et al. 1992; Lan et
al. 1995; Chen et al. 1998; Li and Zhu 2000; Wang
and Li 2001; Yang et al. 2004;Li2004; Du et al.
2008). Triplophysa longipectoralis is most similar to
T. yunnanensis,T. flavicorpus, T. nasobarbatula and
T. zhenfengensis by body covered with scales, but it
can be distinguished from T. yunnanensis by the
following characters: dorsal fin emarginate (vs.
truncate in T. yunnanensis); caudal fin forked (vs.
slightly emarginate in T. yunnanensis); T. longi-
pectoralis can be also distinguished from T. flavi-
corpus,T.nasobarbatulaand T. zhenfengensis by the
following characters: eyes vestigial (vs. normal in T.
flavicorpus, T. nasobarbatula and T. zhenfengensis);
anus close to anal-fin origin (vs. far away from anal-fin
origin in T. flavicorpus, T. nasobarbatula and T.
zhenfengensis).
Triplophysa longipectoralis,T. tianeensis,T. aluen-
sis,T. gejiuensis,T. shilinensis and T. longibarbatus
share the following common characters: scales rudi-
mentary or absent; pigmentation degenerated; barbels
developed; nostril valve elongated into a barbel-like
process; fins developed. But T. longip ectora l i s can be
further distinguished from T. tianeensis by the follow-
ing characters: scaled (vs. scaleless in T. tianeensis);
branched rays of dorsal fin 8 (vs. 7 in T. tianeensis);
Fig. 3 Distribution of fishes of genus Triplophysa in South-
western China. specifically as follows: 1 T. macromaculatus,
T. macrophthalma,T. yunnanensis;2T. shilinensis,T. xiang-
shuingensis;3T. aluensis;4T. nanpanjiangensis;5T.
fuxianensis;6T. lacustris;7T. gejiuensis;8T. zhenfengensis;
9T. longibarbatus,T. nasobarbatula;10T. nandanensis;11T.
flavicorpus;12T. tianeensis;13T. xiangxiensis
224 Environ Biol Fish (2009) 85:221227
dorsal fin emarginate (vs. truncate in T. tianeensis); tip
of pelvic fin extend beyond anus (vs. not extend beyond
anus in T. tianeensis); dorsal-fin origin above pelvic-
fin origin (vs. posterior to pelvic-fin origin in T.
tianeensis). T. longipectoralis can be further distin-
guished from T. aluensis by the following characters:
scaled (vs. scaleless in T. aluensis); dorsal fin
emarginate (vs. truncate in T. aluensis); tip of pelvic
fin extend beyond anus (vs. not extend beyond anus
in T. aluensis); dorsal-fin origin above pelvic-fin origin
(vs. anterior to pelvic-fin origin in T. aluensis). T.
longipectoralis can be further distinguished from T.
gejiuensis by the following characters: scaled (vs.
scaleless in T. gejiuensis); blotches present (vs. absent
in T. gejiuensis); dorsal fin emarginate (vs. truncate in
T. gejiuensis); dorsal-fin origin above pelvic-fin origin
(vs. anterior to pelvic-fin origin in T. gejiue n s is). T.
longipectoralis can be further distinguished from T.
shilinensis by the following characters: scaled (vs.
scaleless in T. shilinensis); blotches present (vs. absent
in T. shilinensis); branched rays of dorsal fin 8 (vs. 7 in
T. shilinensis); dorsal fin emarginate (vs. truncate
in T. shilinensis). T. longipectoralis can be
further distinguished from T. longibarbatus by the
following characters: scaled (vs. scaleless in T. long-
ibarbatus); 3dorsal fin emarginate (vs. truncate in T.
longibarbatus); blotches present (vs. absent in T. lo n g-
ibarbatus); branched rays of caudal fin 16 (14 vs. in T.
longibarbatus).
Key to the species of Triplophysa in the Xijiang
River water system
1Pectoral fin highly developed, reaching beyond
pelvic fin origin ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa longipectoralis (Liujiang River)
Pectoral fin not reaching beyond pelvic fin origin
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ 2
2Caudal fin slightly emarginate∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙3
Caudal fin forked∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙8
3Body covered with scales∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙4
Body not covered with scales∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙5
4Dorsal-fin origin above pelvic-fin origin∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙Triplophysa nanpanjiangensis (Nanpanjiang River)
Dorsal-fin origin anterior to pelvic-fin origin∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ Triplophysa yunnanensis (Nanpanjiang River)
5Dorsal fin emarginate ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa macromaculatus (Nanpanjiang River)
Dorsal fin truncate ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ 6
6Branched rays of anal fin 7, branched rays of
caudal fin 14 ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa macrophthalma (Nanpanjiang River)
Branched rays of anal fin 6, branched rays of
caudal fin 1517 ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ 7
7Rostral barbels short, reaching to or slightly
reaching beyond vertical anterior margin of eyes, anus
far away from anal-fin origin ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa fuxianensis (Fuxianhu Lake)
Rostral barbels long, reaching to or slightly
reaching beyond vertical posterior margin of
Species name Description Type locality Water system
T. gejiuensis Chu and Chen (1979) Gejiu, Yunnan Nanpanjiang River
T. macrophthalma Zhu and Guo (1985) Yiliang, Yunnan Nanpanjiang River
T. nanpanjiangensis Zhu and Cao (1988) Zhanyi, Yunnan Nanpanjiang River
T. fuxianensis Yang and Chu (1990) Fuxianhu Lake, Yunnan Fuxianhu Lake
T. lacustris Yang and Chu (1990) Xingyunhu Lake, Yunnan Xingyunhu Lake
T. macromaculatus Yang (1990) Yiliang, Yunnan Nanpanjiang River
T. yunnanensis Yang (1990) Yiliang, Yunnan Nanpanjiang River
T. shilinensis Chen et al. (1992) Shilin, Yunnan Nanpanjiang River
T. nandanensis Lan et al. (1995) Nandan, Guangxi Hongshuihe River
T. longibarbatus Chen et al. (1998) Libo, Guizhou Liujiang River
T. aluensis Li and Zhu (2000) Alu, Yunnan Nanpanjiang River
T. nasobarbatula Wang and Li (2001) Libo, Guizhou Liujiang River
T. zhenfengensis Wang and Li (2001) Zhenfeng, Guizhou Beipanjiang River
T. flavicorpus Yang et al. (2004) Duan, Guangxi Hongshuihe River
T. tianeensis Chen et al. (2004) Tiane, Guangxi Hongshuihe River
T. xiangshuingensis Li (2004) Shilin, Yunnan Nanpanjiang River
Table 2 Recorded fish
species of Triplophysa in
Xijiang River water system
Environ Biol Fish (2009) 85:221227 225
eyes, anus close to anal-fin origin ∙∙∙∙∙∙ ∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa lacustris (Xingyunhu Lake)
8Body covered with scales∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙9
Body not covered with scales∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙11
9Dorsal fin closer to snout tip than caudal-fin
base ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ ∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa nasobarbatula (Liujiang River)
Dorsal fin at midpoint of body∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙10
10Branched rays of caudal fin 1415 ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa zhenfengensis (Beipanjiang River)
Branched rays of caudal fin 16 ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa flavicorpus (Hongshuihe River)
11Dorsal fin emarginate∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙12
Dorsal fin truncate∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙13
12Dorsal fin closer to snout tip than caudal-fin
base ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa xiangshuingensis (Nanpanjiang River)
Dorsal fin at midpoint of body∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa nandanensis (Hongshuihe River)
13Tip of pelvic fin not extend beyond anus
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ 14
Tip of pelvic fin extend beyond anus∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙15
14Dorsal-fin origin anterior to pelvic-fin origin
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ Triplophysa aluensis (Nanpanjiang River)
Dorsal-fin origin posterior to pelvic-fin origin
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ Triplophysa tianeensis (Hongshuihe River)
15Anterior nostrils without elongate barbel-like tip
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa gejiuensis (Nanpanjiang River)
Anterior nostrils with elongate barbel-like tip
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ 16
16Branched rays of dorsal fin 7, branched rays of
anal fin 5 ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa shilinensis (Nanpanjiang River)
Branched rays of dorsal fin 8, branched rays of
anal fin 6 ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙ ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙
∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙Triplophysa longibarbatus (Liujiang River)
Comparative materials
T. gejiuensis Chu et Chen: KIZ 7803001-005, 7803007-
008, 7 ex., syntypes, 36.545.8 mm SL, Nanpanjiang
River Basin: Gejiu Co., Yunnan Prov., China.
T. nanpanjiangensis Zhu et Cao: KIZ 2008006575-
576, 2 ex., 58.462.4 mm SL, Nanpanjiang River
Basin: Luoping Co., Yunnan Prov., China.
T. yunnanensis Yang: KIZ 874197, 874199, 874200,
3 ex., syntypes, 48.562.7 mm SL, Nanpanjiang River
Basin: Yiliang Co., Yunnan Prov., China.
T. macromaculatus Yang: KIZ 874021-022, 2 ex.,
syntypes, 70.583.7 mm SL, Nanpanjiang River
Basin: Yiliang Co., Yunnan Prov., China.
T. fuxianensis Yan g et Chu: KIZ 873126-128,
8611025-027, 029, 7 ex., syntypes, 56.671.2 mm
SL, Nanpanjiang River Basin: Fuxianhu, Yunnan
Prov., China.
T. lacustris Yang et Chu: KIZ 00394-396, 00400-
401, 00404, 00409, 00411, 00412, 9 ex., syntypes,
49.755.8 mm SL, Nanpanjiang River Basin:
Xingyunhu, Yunnan Prov., China.
T. shilinensis Chen et Yang: KIZ 913001-002, 2
ex., syntypes, 59.159.6 mm SL, Nanpanjiang River
Basin: Shilin Co., Yunnan Prov., China.
T. aluensis Li: KIZ 2006005-007, 3 ex., 43.3
80.7 mm SL, Nanpanjiang River Basin: Alu Co.,
Yunnan Prov., China.
T. nasobarbatula Wa ng et Li: KIZ 200503030,
200503069, 2005030711-712, 4 ex., 31.141.2 mm SL,
Liujiang River Basin: Libo Co., Guizhou Prov., China.
T. nandanensis Lan, Yang et Chen: KIZ 9110008-,
10 ex., syntypes, 56.671.2 mm SL, Hongshuihe
River Basin: Nandan Co., Guangxi Zhuang
Autonomous Region, China.
T. flavicorpus Yang, Chen et Lan: KIZ 995003,
0011051-554, 00120610, 00120614, 00120624, 8 ex.,
syntypes, 51.583.5 mm SL, Hongshuihe River
Basin: Duan Co., Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous
Region, China.
T. tianeensis Chen, Cui et Yang: KIZ 200301001-
006, 6 ex., syntypes, 35.858.6 mm SL, Hongshuihe
River Basin: Tiane Co., Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous
Region, China.
T. xiangxiensis Yang et Yuan: KIZ 9705001-005, 5
ex., 50.099.5 mm SL, Yuanjiang River Basin:
Longshan Co., Hunan Pro., China.
T. longibarbatus Chen, Yang, Sket et Aljancis:
953001-003, 3 ex., syntypes, 27.354.6 mm SL,
Liujiang River Basin: Libo Co., Guizhou Prov., China.
Acknowledgements We express our particular thanks to Lan JH
for donating the specimens of Triplophysa longipectoralis.Wealso
express our particular thanks to Li Y for identifying the food in
the fish stomach. This work was supported by National Basic
Research Program of China (973 Program) (2007CB411600), the
National Natural Science Foundation of China (30730017) and
Science-technology basic condition platform from The Ministry
of Science and Technology of the Peoples Republic of China
(2005DKA21402).
226 Environ Biol Fish (2009) 85:221227
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... The genus Triplophysa Rendahl 1933 is one of the largest groups in the family Nemacheilidae, most of which are so far known from China (He et al., 2012;Kottelat, 2012;Ren et al., 2012;Eschmeyer, 2014). It can be distinguished from other nemacheilid genera by the following characters: nostrils closely situated; posterior wall of the bony capsule of the swim bladder present; a specific type of sexual dimorphism in which males have tubercle-bearing, elevated skin on both sides of the head and a thickened tuberculated pad or agglomerations on the dorsal surfaces of the broadened and widened pectoral-fin rays (Zhu, 1989;He, 2008;Zheng et al., 2009;Prokofiev, 2010;He et al., 2012;Ren et al., 2012;Yang et al., 2012). ...
... According to Lan et al. (2013), these species can be placed in three groups according to the status of eyes. Eyes normal, Triplophysa nandanensis Lan, Yang & Chen 1995;Triplophysa nasobarbatula Wang & Li 2001;Triplophysa zhenfengensis Wang & Li 2001; Triplophysa longipectoralis Zheng, Du, Chen & Yang 2009; Triplophysa huapingensis Zheng Chen & Yang 2012. Eyes reduced, Triplophysa yun- nanensis Yang 1990; Triplophysa lingyunensis (Liao, Wang & Luo 1997 (Chu & Chen 1979); Triplophysa xiangxiensis (Yang, Yuan & Liao 1986); Triplophysa shilinensis Chen& Yang1992; T. longibarbata (Chen, Yang, Sket & Aljancic 1998) Romero et al. (2009) and Kottelat (2012) and treats them as Triplophysa. ...
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... Current knowledge of genus Triplophysa is restricted to the description of morphology, life history habits and the discovery of new species of Triplophysa (Zheng et al. 2009;Li et al. 2015), but there are very few studies of the phylogenetic or population genetic structure of these species (Hou et al. 2012). Especially the phylogenetic studies on the genus Triplophysa, which are distributed around the Qilian Mountains is barely been studied. ...
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