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The Relationships Between Fire Service Response Time and Fire Outcomes

Authors:
  • New Zealand Fire Service

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Fire service response to fire is premised on the assumption that the earlier the fire is attacked the smaller will be the consequences to people and property. A simple method is shown for measuring the influence fire service response has on building fire development. The results for New Zealand are shown. The method is then extended to determining a nominal monetary benefit from rapid response and benefits in terms of other desired outcomes. The method allows the benefits of monitored fire alarms and sprinklers to be quantified. Finally the method is extended to determining the impact on fire service response of calls from cellular phones versus standard landlines. In the New Zealand circumstances the use of cellular phones does not appear on average to provide a speedier alert to the fire service and generally involves a marginally slower response owing to delays in locating incidents. This results in a measurably greater monetary loss. KeywordsEconomic value of rapid response-Fire condition on arrival-Monetary loss to fire
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... Despite the efforts undertaken worldwide to reduce the fire risk, fires continue to result in losses in heritage sites, and the authorities are concerned about measures to be implemented (Granda and Ferreira, 2019;Ferreiraa et al., 2016;Okubo, 2016;Yuan et al., 2016;Challands, 2010;Lee et al., 2021). Even fires limited to 1-3 houses may over time result in homogeneous heritage sites becoming fragmented by new buildings or vacant spaces. ...
... The review of relevant international research (Granda and Ferreira, 2019;Ferreiraa et al., 2016;Okubo, 2016;Yuan et al., 2016;Challands, 2010;Lee et al., 2021) provided knowledge about risk factors and possible measures. The review does, however, leave the impression that Norway has a leading role when it comes to practical implementation. ...
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Goodchild M., Sanderson K., Leung-Wai J., Nana G., (2005), The Cost of Managing the Risk of Fire in New Zealand, NZFSC Report Number 53. Wellington: New Zealand Fire Service Commission.
Human behaviour contributing to unintentional residential fire deaths 1997–2003. NZFSC Report no 47
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Page, Ian, (2009), The cost of repair to fire damaged buildings, NZFSC Report Number 91. Wellington: New Zealand Fire Service Commission.