Article

Fatty acid content of depot fat in the northern fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus)

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Abstract

The fatty acid content of depot fat samples from 15 northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) were determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Callorhinus ursinus has a high proportion of short chain saturated acids: C10, C11, C12, C13, C15. Unsaturated longer chain acids C16:1, and C16:2, and C18:1 also were found. Results obtained are compared to a previously reported milk lipid analysis of the northern fur seal.

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... Cutaneous lesions are a common issue in captive and 32 free-ranging pinnipeds, associated with several infec-33 tious agents, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites and 34 fungi [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]. Their thick stratum corneum and fatty 35 acid secretions grant pinnipeds a relative resistance to 36 fungal skin infections [9,10]. Nevertheless, several 37 cases of fungal infections caused by molds have been 38 reported in captive pinnipeds, including Microsporum 39 canis in a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) [11], Microspo-40 rum gypseum in Australian (Neophoca cinerea) and 41 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) [ 8,12] 42 and Trichophyton mentagrophytes in gray (Hali-43 choerus grypus) and harbor seals and in a captive 44 Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) [13,14]. ...
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