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... According to Garber and Costantino (2007), social justice art education is premised on the convection that teachers act as guides to their students and education should be relevant to the lives of students. In her article titled "Social Justice and Art Education", Garber (2004) characterizes social justice art education based on four aspects. ...
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p style="text-align:justify">This study seeks to reveal the perceptions of pre-service visual arts teachers on social justice through art-based practices focused on social justice. Designing on visual phenomenology, this study was performed in the fall semester of the 2018-2019 academic year. Five different activities involving visual inquiries are presented to reveal the perceptions of the pre-service teachers on social justice. The research participants are 35 (13 male, 22 female) sophomore-level pre-service teachers. The data are obtained through course documents, reflective diaries and semi-structured interviews. The data are then analysed through content analysis; reliability and validity are ensured through triangulation. This study identifies four different themes: association, questioning, transformation and reflection. The findings show that the pre-service teachers questioned common issues related to social justice. It was observed in the activities performed in this study that the pre-service teachers identified the visual themes. They mentioned common social justice issues based on the things they experienced and their observations. These are such as women's rights, violence against women, children's rights, LGBT, animal rights, language and religion differences, income imbalance, racism, and discrimination. The issues they questioned were the direct expression of the individual experiences of the pre-service teachers through visuals.</p
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In the midst of future-oriented dialogues within the field, we turned our attention broadly toward the multiplicity of educational approaches that might characterize U.S. K–12 art education today. Through large-scale descriptive survey research (N = 742), we explored K–12 art teachers’ emphasis on 10 common educational approaches: choice-based art education/teaching for artistic behavior (TAB); community-based education; discipline-based art education (DBAE); design education; ecological/environmental education; interdisciplinary education or arts integration; multicultural education; social justice; science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)/science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics (STEAM); and visual/material culture. The results confirm we are in a period of plurality, albeit more defined by visual/material culture and multicultural education. The range of ways in which these 10 educational approaches can exhibit theoretically and in practice raises a number of critical questions. We recommend any future sketches of the field explore these nuances—delving deeper into how each of these curricular movements is conceptualized and enacted in K–12 art education practice.
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This chapter demonstrates the strengths of a Visual Critical Pedagogy (VCP) oriented program for high school. VCP offers a dialogic, creative, and political practice that transcends the boundaries of the conventional art class, transforming the student from a passive consumer of the art market into an agent of social knowledge and change acting together with the teacher. The chapter examines final projects by high school art students as alternatives to official Israeli art curriculum. The projects are analyzed through the two axes of VCP—exposure-deciphering and representation-visibility—to demonstrate how they facilitate creative dialogue that fuses the personal and political and maximizes the potential of visual images to help us imagine and work our way up to a better reality.
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This article presents an educational approach that merges ideas of critical pedagogy with those of visual culture. According to this approach – termed visual critical pedagogy – art is an integral part of the textures of society and culture and their manifold and complex visual expressions, including the more controversial and subversive among them. It objects to locking art and visual culture in art departments, and to restricting art history to a formalist analysis of ‘masterpieces’ – which represent primarily the Western art market and its underlying politics. It likewise rejects the conception of art history as the history of artists and art movements – a conservative approach still prevalent in many academic institutions. Integrating critical pedagogy with visual culture provides fertile ground for an educational practice within art classes and beyond them. Visual critical pedagogy is formulated using the concepts exposure, deciphering, representation and visibility, shared by both critical pedagogy and visual culture. These are discussed in the context of educational projects and activities planned and implemented by Jewish and Arab students enrolled in an education-through-art program in an academic college in northern Israel.
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The aim of this article is to contribute more knowledge about how arts educational practice in the school context can be understood and developed. The cooperation between Tentahaus Oslo (TO), an initiative driven by artists, and the basic education section for minority students at an upper secondary school is brought forward as an alternative to more traditional forms of encounters with art and art communication in basic education and in the voluntary music and performing arts school. The article points out how the didactic thinking meets structural challenges and opens up spaces where participatory artistic processes and pedagogical processes are integrated. Didactic components like time, space and exchange, an extended time perspective, the placement of an atelier in school, a public exhibition space attached to the atelier, as well as exchange between teachers and the artist, appear as constitutive elements in the systematic cooperation between the fields. In a cross curricular perpsective on learning the article suggests that experiences from the cooperation might have transfer value to a more general school context and to the organization of the music and performing arts school and its teaching practice. The article also directs the attention to didactic arrangements that might increase the amount of students with a heterogenous cultural background in the music and performing arts school. In a larger perspective the importance of encounters with art in an educational context might enhance democratic thinking. The methodological approach is aletic hermeneutics, where empirical material is generated through narrative and critical dialogue.
Article
In Ghana, as in many areas of the world, the meanings attached to indigenous art forms are based on larger philosophical foundations. Those meanings are at the crux of the ongoing struggle in the minds of many Ghanaians over the appropriateness of Ghana's traditional arts in their contemporary education system. The indigenous arts are caught in the crossfire between the need to protect and project the country's unique cultural heritage and the adoption of a perceived modernity. This article reports an investigation of the presence and absence of indigenous arts in Ghana's current art educational policies and practices in light of the disparate yet related forces of change that continue to affect them: the British/missionary model of education inherited from the colonial era, Western science, urbanization, cultural commodification, and Christianity. The multiple perspectives and contradictory attitudes revealed in this study contribute to ambivalent educational policies and practices which are re-locating indigenous arts from spheres of “traditional” practice to “modern” spheres of entertainment and commodity.
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This article discusses the place sexual diversity has within multicultural art education with a specific focus on the ways culture is discussed in multicultural arteducationdiscourses. Idraw on queer theory's contribution to issues of identity and subjectivity to address and rethink the concept of culture. I specifically analyze how the term “culture” operates in both mainstream and social reconstructive approaches in multicultural art and whether the term limits our understanding of the complex intersections of sexuality with race, ethnicity, gender, and social class.
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The Studies Invited Lecture is a presentation given each year at the National Art Education Annual Convention. The presenter is acknowledged as a leading art educator and is elected by the Studies in Art Education Editorial Board. This year's recipient was Patricia L. Stuhr. She is currently Professor and Chair, Department of Art Education, The Ohio State University. Professor Stuhr has published extensively in art education and related fields on issues of multiculturalism, postmodernism, feminism, and community-based art education.
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This research focuses on attitudes toward artwork reflected in the official curriculum and pedagogical material in Israeli kindergartens, and the role this attitude plays in the reproduction of the class structure—specifically, the different institutional approaches to artwork in the kindergarten and the reproduction of cultural capital. This microethnographic field research was carried out in two kindergartens. This research reveals two conflicting models regarding the approach to creativity, co-existing de facto in the official art curriculum, and in the related professional literature: the conservative-authoritative approach (focusing on standardization) and the creative approach (focusing on self-expression). Both approaches place a higher value on the cultural capital of the middle to upper socioeconomic classes and “Ashkenazi” culture and ignore the “Sephardic” culture. The conflict between the two approaches at the policy level is resolved in the activity patterns adopted by each teacher based on the social standing of the children's parents.
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This article is based on five case studies of an teaching in Israel in a situation of constant violent conflict. It presents the art teachers' practices and beliefs about coping with their students' experiences of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Three approaches to art education in this context are identified: a) art creation as an act of therapy involving the expression of feelings and thoughts related to violent experiences, b) art education as a means to broaden the gaze on the “Other” and beyond the conflict, and c) art education as dealing with political art and imagery without detaching it from the students' reality. The last approach implies confronting students with “difficult knowledge” (Britzman, 1998), knowledge that they resist because it presents them with moral conflict in their own reality. Although every conflict has its historical, cultural and social conditions, the examples may be relevant for other art educators who are concerned about their students' lives.
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In this article, I use data collected from research conducted in the summer of 2001 at the Grass Roots Arts and Community Effort (GRACE) in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. I present case studies of artists with developmental disabilities, who along with other isolated groups, are considered to be Outsider Artists. I begin the article by defining this term as it is understood and defined by the art world. While this label is expedient and the participants of GRACE fall within this label, I suggest that the socialization found in the GRACE workshops is atypical of Outsider Art, and thus requires that we think more deeply about this label. Later, I discuss how the interaction between the staff and participants raise questions about teaching and learning, and suggest that public education has something to learn from this interaction.
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This article is a description and analysis of the course processes and project outcomes of an an education class where feminist issues were a significant part of the course. Final projects were designed to contribute to Myra Sadker Day, established to honor Sadker's significant work to expose gender bias in U.S. classrooms and to encourage equitable practices in the classroom. Sadker Day was thought to be important in promoting education about feminist issues in classrooms by actively involving students in feminist issues. Four themes from scholarship on feminist pedagogy will be used to analyze class discussions and projects: mastery, authority, voice, and positionality.