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Local Virtuality in an Organization: Implications for Community of Practice

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Abstract

We focus on two phenomena in our case study of a high-tech firm. Local virtuality: The pervasive use of computer mediated communication for interaction with physical proximate people, even when located near-by. Hyperconnectivity: The instant availability of people for communication anywhere and anytime. We show that computer mediated communication has gone beyond long-distance media to be the predominant mode of communication. The result is a high level of trust and community, especially in a department with high interdependence and a common goal.
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... 'Hyper-connectivity' [38], the unprecedented linking of individuals and technologies into vast new global social-physical networks, "opens up more points of presence for attack and exploitation" [5,35]. Due to this 'hyper-connectivity' of human and technology, the complexity and unpredictability of vulnerabilities have increased exponentially. ...
Conference Paper
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Article
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... 'Hyper-connectivity' [38], the unprecedented linking of individuals and technologies into vast new global social-physical networks, "opens up more points of presence for attack and exploitation" [5,35]. Due to this 'hyper-connectivity' of human and technology, the complexity and unpredictability of vulnerabilities have increased exponentially. ...
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The focus on cyber security as an interaction between technical elements and humans has typically confined consideration of the latter to practical issues of implementation, conventionally those of ‘human performance factors’ of vigilance etc., ‘raising awareness’ and/or ‘incentivization’ of people and organizations to participate and adapt their behavior. But this is far too narrow a view that seriously constrains the ability of cyber security as a whole to adapt and evolve to keep up with adaptive, innovative attackers in a rapidly-changing technological, business and social landscape, in which personal preferences of users are also dynamically evolving. While there is isolated research across different research areas, we noticed the lack of a holistic framework combining a range of applicable theoretical concepts (e.g., cultural co-evolution such as technological arms races, opportunity management, behavioral and business models) and technological solutions on reducing human-related risks in the cyber security and cybercrime ecosystems, which involve multiple groups of human actors including offenders, victims, preventers and promoters. This paper reports our ongoing work in developing such a socio-technical framework (1) to allow a more comprehensive understanding of human-related risks within cyber security and cybercrime ecosystems and (2) to support the design of more effective approaches to engaging individuals and organizations in the reduction of such risks. We are in the process of instantiating this framework to encourage behavioral changes in two use cases that capture diverse and complicated socio-technical interactions in cyber-physical systems.
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Thesis
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From the Publisher: This work will be of interest to researchers and practitioners working in organization science and business administration. Also, consultants and organizations at large will find the book useful as it will provide them with insights into how other organizations manage and facilitate knowledge sharing and how potential failures can be prevented.
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Innovation is shown as a new patterning of our experiences of being together, as new meaning emerges from ordinary everyday work conversations. Viewed from a complex responsive process perspective, innovation feels less menacing and becomes a challenging, exciting process of participating with others in the evolution of work.