ArticlePDF Available

Abstract and Figures

Are consumers more likely to select brands offered by companies that engage in cause-related marketing (CRM)? Somewhat surprisingly, little evidence exists that directly addresses this issue. Accordingly, the present examination investigates whether and when CRM efforts influence consumer choice. The results from several studies indicate that information regarding a company’s support of social causes can affect choice. However, CRM’s influence on choice is found to depend on the perceived motivation underlying the company’s CRM efforts as well as whether consumers must trade off company sponsorship of causes for lower performance or higher price. The results also indicate that CRM cues affect choice primarily through compensatory strategies involving trade-offs rather than through noncompensatory strategies. Implications of the current findings for existing theory are discussed along with directions for future research.
Content may be subject to copyright.
A preview of the PDF is not available
... Although consumers are inclined to value companies' sustainability-related initiatives (Casalegno et al., 2022;Coleman et al., 2020;Diehl et al., 2016), not all sustainability-driven companies are successful. The overall market share of ethical products is relatively low (d' Astous & Legendre, 2009), few consumers want to learn about a product's ethical qualities (Zane, Irwin, & Reczek, 2016), and companies' publicity and advertisements about their sustainability initiatives are often perceived as insincere, ethically doubtful, or even as a manipulative trick to sell over-priced products (Barone et al., 2000;d'Astous et al., 2020). Especially, people with an individualistic mindset, who are not uncommon in countries such as the United States of America, Great Britain, and the Netherlands, can be skeptical of corporate philanthropy (Chang & Cheng, 2015). ...
... | 9 management showed that consumers value a company's engagement in sustainability-driven activities (Coleman et al., 2020). However, expressing these activities in advertisements could be interpreted as ethically doubtful and, therefore, backfire (Barone et al., 2000; also see Chang & Cheng, 2015), thus complicating companies' decisionmaking on what frame to use in their advertisements. Therefore, various researchers have recommended further in-depth studies on the advertising appeals of sustainability-driven companies (e.g., Taylor, 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
Today, consumers expect companies to be socially responsible. However, the literature is undecided about the effects of communicating one's corporate social responsibility activities to consumers. This raises the question of how sustainability‐driven companies can best advertise their products to stimulate ethical consumption: using self‐benefit frames, where the main beneficiary is the consumer, or using other‐benefit frames, where the main beneficiary is a third party. Using three experiments, this study examines the effect of other‐benefit (vs. self‐benefit) advertising frames on consumers' impulse purchases from sustainability‐driven companies. Increasing impulse purchases can help such companies to strengthen their competitive positions. Additionally, the extent to which the two types of justifications (moral vs. deservingness) explain the proposed effect of advertising frames. The results show that only other‐benefit frames affect impulse buying behavior, both directly, as mediated by moral justification. This study's insights may help sustainability‐driven companies to decide on their advertising strategies by providing evidence that other‐benefit‐framed advertisements are more effective in enhancing impulse purchases than self‐benefit‐framed advertisements.
... This relationship flows through CSR outcome variables such as satisfaction (Luo & Bhattacharya, 2006). Interestingly, customers are even willing to pay higher prices for the products of a company that in their perception are socially responsible (Barone, Miyazaki, & Taylor, 2000;Sen & Bhattacharya, 2001). The researchers have studied relationship between CSR perception on one hand and one of the mentioned outcomes on the other in a limited way and the interrelations amongst these have largely been ignored (Bianchi, Bruno, & Sarabia-Sanchez, 2019). ...
... According to our study, there is a significant positive relationship between CSR perception and price fairness. Thus, customers are willing to pay higher prices for the products of a company that is socially responsible (Barone et al., 2000;Sen & Bhattacharya, 2001). Social identity and social justice theories propound that the relationship between a customer and a firm has an exchange angle, based on customers' own wants, and a citizenship dimension, influenced by social values (David, Kline, & Dai, 2005). ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose-Importance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in marketing domain is increasing immensely. The effect of CSR perception on the purchase intention differs on the basis of mediators and contexts. The objective of this study is to examine the consumer behaviour of young consumers. For this, impact of CSR perception on purchase intention, satisfaction and price fairness of Generation Z is studied. Design/methodology/approach-Preliminary data analysis is run to check normality, skewness and common method bias. PLS-SEM is deployed to examine the relationships amongst the research variables. Sequential mediation through PLS bootstrapping helped in exploring new and exciting research results which are supported with literature. Findings-The CSR perception of Generation Z does not have a direct effect on their purchase intention. Interestingly, satisfaction and price fairness fully mediate the relationship between CSR perception and purchase intentions separately, i.e. CSR perception of Generation Z influences purchase intention only through satisfaction and price fairness. Furthermore, satisfaction and price fairness are also found to sequentially mediate the relationship between CSR perception and purchase intentions. Research limitations/implications-The research will aid not only the fast-food industry but the industries that are looking to focus on what Generation Z consumers expect in emerging markets including India. Understanding consumer expectations out of CSR initiatives will help them to incorporate social considerations into their marketing strategies and increase their profitability. Generation Z is regarded as the most challenging consumer demographic to market due to their proclivity for conducting extensive research and comparison shopping before making a purchase decision. As a result, the companies that want to use CSR as a strategy may find it advantageous to investigate how marketing of their CSR initiatives will lead to competitive edge and influence purchase decisions of this generational cohort. Originality/value-This study adds to the academic literature by developing and evaluating a research model for consumer responses of a very important generation cohort to CSR in an emerging economy setting. CSR activities alone may not be enough to improve purchase intention of Generation Z adults. Sequential mediation for Generation Z adults' relationship between CSR and price fairness flows through satisfaction and finally to purchase intention is interesting because it clearly establishes a link amongst belief, attitude and actions of the target audience under study in a meaningful way within the framework given by cognitive consistency theory.
... Specifically, employees participate in VEGB out of self-interest or based on reciprocity (e.g., to attain a positive reputation). Accordingly, studies have demonstrated that perceived instrumental motives influence individuals' responses (Barone et al., 2000). For instance, Chernev and Blair (2015) have shown that the beneficial effects of social goodwill are mitigated by perceived self-interest. ...
Article
Full-text available
Starting from the perspective of social perception of voluntary employee green behavior (VEGB) and studies on the attribution of VEGB, we explore the phenomenon that employees can show different perceptions and behavioral responses to VEGB according to their attribution to VEGB. We served to examine the hypotheses. The results of a two-wave study show that when employees believe VEGB is motivated by instrumental concerns, VEGB is more likely to evoke a low level of warmth and competence, which produces less green advocacy. However, if employees believe VEGB is motivated by moral reasons, VEGB is more likely to prompt more warmth and competence perceptions and elicit greener advocacy from employees. In addition, theoretical and practical contributions are discussed.
... It is defined as 'a company's commitment to maximising sustainable economic, socio-cultural and environmental well-being through operations, policies and business resources' (Du et al., 2011). In addition, CSR is an approach that seeks to achieve strategic goals such as increasing sales (Barone et al., 2000;Du et al., 2011). It is considered an approach to stimulating the economic, social and environmental concerns of companies in the communities where they operate (Raimi et al., 2015). ...
Article
Literature in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has mainly focused on customers, particularly on their loyalty, behavioural intent and satisfaction. That is, the effectiveness of CSR dimensions has been less considered by scholars. Hence, this research strives to explore the effect of CSR dimensions on the green behaviour among employees of food businesses in Iran. In this vein, the mediating role of green trust and the moderating role of gender in the relationship between the CSR dimensions and the green behaviour of employees have been investigated. The samples of this research included 415 employees of food businesses and companies in Iran. The findings reveal that the CSR dimensions (economic CSR, ethical CSR and philanthropic CSR) directly and indirectly—through the mediating variable of green trust—played an important role in shaping the green behaviour of employees. In this study, the direct and indirect effects of legal CSR on green behaviour among employees were not confirmed. Furthermore, the results represent that the gender variable moderates the effect of the CSR dimensions on the green behaviour of employees, highlighting that economic CSR and ethical CSR played a prominent role in shaping the green behaviour of respectively males and females. In addition, the theoretical and practical implications of the research discussed the impact of green behaviour on producing environmentally friendly products in order to sustainable development in the food business.
... Some of the past studies demonstrated that consumer perception of the motives of the CSR significantly impacts on their outcome variables. Specifically, if the consumers believe that the CSR activities of the company are sincere, genuine, and serving the public, then it can increase their purchase intention, patronage intention, and word-of-mouth intentions [35][36][37]. ...
... Maignan & Ferrell, 2004). According toBarone et al. (2000), buyers are prepared to actively support firms that pledge in marketing to environmentally friendly or ethical values(Maignan & Ferrell, 2004). On the other hand, some authors have observed that a large number of customers declare their willingness to buy products from companiesengaged in social activities (Ross et al., 2011).Fatma et al. (2020) explored the effect of banks' CSR implementation on the interaction and eW-OM of 239 customers on Facebook in the banking sector in India. ...
Article
Full-text available
This research explored and examined the link between electronic word-of-mouth, corporate social responsibility, and loyalty of 282 customers using banking services in Vietnam (PLS-SEM) through the Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling. The data were gathered using convenience sampling, with a sample of 282 customers who used banking services in Vietnam and interacted with the bank through social media. The survey is intended to include 16 questions separated into two parts: the first part contains 5 demographic questions, and the second part contains 11 questions divided into three sets of factors: corporate social responsibility, electronic word-of-mouth, and loyalty. The survey was emailed to customers using banking services and interacting with banks via social media in Vietnam. According to the findings of the empirical study, there is a direct and indirect link between corporate social responsibility, electronic word-of-mouth, and customer loyalty in Vietnam’s banking sector. The results of empirical research in Vietnam’s banking industry indicate that corporate social responsibility has direct and positive impact on customer loyalty; corporate social responsibility has a direct and positive impact on customer’s word-of-mouth; electronic word-of-mouth has a direct and positive impact on customer loyalty; and finally, corporate social responsibility has an indirect impact on customer loyalty through customer’s electronic word-of-mouth. AcknowledgmentThe author would like to thank all the customers who completed the survey. The author would like to thank all parties and the Banking University of Ho Chi Minh City for their excellent support and assistance in completing this research.
... Based on the same principle of causal inferences, new research has addressed the issue of perceived motivations behind corporate actions, this time distinguishing between the responsibilities related to the company's reasons for service, which focus on potential benefits for the business itself, and those related to public service reasons, which focus on the potential benefits to outsiders of the company [17,28,29]. Usually, the patterns in business services are perceived negatively by consumers, as they signify an individualistic or opportunistic perspective. ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study is to examine the overlap between sustainable communication and business, as well as its impact on the consumer’s perception and the nature of the motivation. We attempted to create a synthesis of prior research based on a literature review to understand how consumers comprehend corporate sustainability communications. The selection of the articles and related works is based on the presence of the keywords in the Science Direct database. The results provided us with 15 results for the research papers with “sustainable communication” in the title and 46 results with the keyword “sustainable communication” in the title, abstract or author-specified keywords since the year 2000. We synthesized these works and major works in the field according to our model, based on the attribution theory frame. We have emphasized the effect of sustainable communication fit with the company on the consumer’s perception of internal motivation by mobilizing the attribution and congruence theories, while highlighting the importance of the company’s perceived effort and the moderating role of other situational variables.
Chapter
Cause-related marketing (CRM) is an important type of corporate social responsibility that offers engagement initiatives to consumers, brands and non-profit organizations. This study aims to explore the factors affecting Tunisian consumers’ intention to participate in cause-related marketing campaigns. Building on the previous literature on CRM, the authors focused on the factors that predict consumer’s intention to purchase products supporting social causes. Taking into consideration these determinants, a qualitative study was conducted with ten consumer-members of a Tunisian virtual community via individual semi-structured interviews conducted online. The results show that the three types of fit (cause-brand fit; cause-consumer fit; brand-consumer fit), consumer-cause identification, the involvement in the product category, the attribution of altruistic motivations and the attitudes towards CRM are the factors favoring the purchase intention of the Tunisian consumer. These results corroborate prior research and provide more particular information on Tunisian customers. The present findings can help companies in Tunisia design stronger cause-related marketing initiatives.
Article
Full-text available
The role of effort and accuracy in the adaptive use of decision processes is examined. A computer simulation using the concept of elementary information processes identified heuristic choice strategies that approximate the accuracy of normative procedures while saving substantial effort. However, no single heuristic did well across all task and context conditions. Of particular interest was the finding that under time constraints, several heuristics were more accurate than a truncated normative procedure. Using a process-tracing technique that monitors information acquisition behaviors, two experiments tested how closely the efficient processing patterns for a given decision problem identified by the simulation correspond to the actual processing behavior exhibited by subjects. People appear highly adaptive in responding to changes in the structure of the available alternatives and to the presence of time pressure. In general, actual behavior corresponded to the general patterns of efficient processing identified by the simulation. Finally, learning of effort and accuracy trade-offs are discussed.
Article
Full-text available
This article links institutional and impression management perspectives in a process model of how controversial and possibly unlawful actions of members of organizations can lead to endorsement and support from key constituencies. This model is grounded in interview, archival, and observational data concerning eight illegitimate actions attributed to members of two social movement organizations. We found that institutional conformity and decoupling illegitimate activities from legitimate structures facilitated spokespersons' efforts to use impression management tactics that shifted attention away from the controversial actions and toward the socially desirable goals endorsed by broader constituencies. As a result, these organizations used publicity generated by illegitimate actions to obtain endorsement and support from those constituencies. We discuss the implications of the model for other kinds of organizations and derive testable propositions. We also consider implications for institutional and impression management theories.
Article
The author examines company advertising campaigns with social dimensions and compares them to matched standard, or nonsocial, campaigns. The author investigates the managers’ objectives for the campaigns with social dimensions, examines the processes creating them, and develops a model for explaining success factors. Most campaigns have mixed objectives, both economic and social, which have many implications. Although these campaigns are not particularly effective in achieving traditional economic objectives, such as increasing sales, they are highly effective in achieving company-oriented objectives, such as motivating the work force or communicating the essence of the company's mission. Drawing on research and theory related to organizational identification, the author discusses causal mechanisms underlying social campaigns’ effectiveness with company-oriented objectives and presents directions for further research. Ethical considerations and managerial implications are discussed, as well.
Article
Cause-related marketing represents the confluence of perspectives from several specialized areas of inquiry such as marketing for nonprofit organizations, the promotion mix, corporate philanthropy, corporate social responsibility, fund-raising management, and public relations. The authors outline the concept of cause-related marketing, its characteristics, and how organizations, both for-profit and not-for-profit, can benefit from effective use of this promising marketing tool.
Article
Although cause-related marketing has become increasingly popular, academic researchers have only begun to examine how consumers respond ro it. In this study, the authors explore in depth how consumers think and feel about cause-related marketing. They develop a framework of consumer responses that includes a typology of consumers. The authors also discuss implications for research, business find nonprofit marketing, and public policy.
Article
The author examines company advertising campaigns with social dimensions and compares them to matched standard, or nonsocial, campaigns. The author investigates the managers' objectives for the campaigns with social dimensions, examines the processes creating them, and develops a model for explaining success factors. Most campaigns have mixed objectives, both economic and social, which have many implications. Although these campaigns are not particularly effective in achieving traditional economic objectives, such as increasing sales, they are highly effective in achieving company-oriented objectives, such as motivating the work force or communicating the essence of the company's mission. Drawing on research and theory related to organizational identification, the author discusses causal mechanisms underlying social campaigns' effectiveness with company-oriented objectives and presents directions for further research. Ethical considerations and managerial implications are discussed, as well.
Article
Although brand theorists suggest that what a person knows about a company (i. e., corporate associations) can influence perceptions of the company's products, little systematic research on these effects exists. The authors examine the effects of two general types of corporate associations on product responses: One focuses on the company's capabilities for producing products, that is, corporate ability (CA) associations, and the other focuses on the company's perceived social responsibility, that is, corporate social responsibility (CSR) associations. The results of three studies, including one that measures respondents' CA and CSR associations for well-known companies and one that uses consumers recruited in a shopping mall, demonstrate that (1) what consumers know about a company can influence their beliefs about and attitudes toward new products manufactured by that company, (2) CA and CSR associations may have different effects on consumer responses to products, and (3) products of companies with negative associations are not always destined to receive negative responses. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for marketing managers and further research.