Article

Neurobehavioral changes in mice offspring induced by prenatal exposure to acute toxicity of sodium selenite

Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, El-Minia University, El-Minia, Egypt
Biologia (Impact Factor: 0.83). 04/2011; 66(2):357-364. DOI: 10.2478/s11756-011-0025-2

ABSTRACT

Selenium is an essential element with a narrow margin between beneficial and toxic effects. This study was aimed to determine
the neurobehavioral changes resulted from the prenatal exposure of mice to high doses of sodium selenite during fetal and
early postnatal development. Atomic absorption for monitoring the placental transfer of selenium to offspring was employed.
The developmental observations as well as the behavioral tests, such as sensory motor reflexes, and learning and memory test
in automatic reflex conditioner (shuttle box) (active avoidance responses) were applied. Adult mice was assigned into three
groups: the first group was remained as a control group given phosphate buffered saline; the second and the third groups were
orally administrated sodium selenite at doses of 1 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg of the diet, respectively started from the 7th day to the end of the gestation period. Appearance of body hair and opening of eyes of the pups from treated mothers were
delayed in a dose-dependent manner. The body weight gain came significantly lower than those of the control especially at
the higher dose. Selenite also inhibited the sensory motor reflexes in all elements of acts and postures in a dose dependent
manner. The active avoidance training-test indicated that selenite exposure was associated with learning impairment. Acetylcholine
recorded a significant decrease in almost all the period of this study. By using atomic absorption, we found a significant
high concentration of selenium in the brain, liver and kidney until the 40th postnatal day, indicating active transfer of selenium from mothers to embryos.

Key wordsselenium–atomic absorption–acetylcholine–learning–sensory motor reflexes

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Available from: Jamaan Ajarem, May 17, 2015
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    • "Thus, selenium at high doses is highly toxic to the tissue of embryos. Based on this study and other previous studies (Goldhaber, 2003; Miguel and Carmen, 2008; Ajarem et al., 2011), we expect that chronic supplementation of selenium can cause serious effects especially abnormal functioning of the nervous system. Therefore, when applied in the therapeutic approaches especially in gestation, selenium must be eventually monitored. "
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    ABSTRACT: Selenium is an essential element with a narrow margin between beneficial and toxic effects. The learning and sensory motor reflexes-changes were studied after the perinatal exposure of mice to acute toxic doses of sodium selenite. Atomic absorption as well as the behavioral observations were employed. Adult pregnant mice was assigned into three groups: the first group was remained as a control group; the second and the third groups were orally administrated sodium selenite at doses of 1 mg/Kg (1 ppm) and 4 mg/kg (4 ppm) of the diet, respectively started from the 7th day of gestation to the 15th day of birth. Results revealed that body weight gain came significantly lower in pups born to treated mothers than those of the control pups. The appearance of body hair and opening of eyes of the pups from treated mothers were delayed in a dose-dependent manner. Selenite also inhibited the sensory motor reflexes in all elements in a dose dependent manner. The active avoidance test indicated that selenite exposure was associated with learning impairment. Acetylcholine recorded a significant decrease in treated pups. Significant high concentrations of selenium in the brain, liver and kidney was detected, indicating active transfer of selenium from mothers during pregnancy and lactation periods.
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate septic complications resulted in behavioral changes in mice offspring. Pregnant Swiss female mice were intraperitonealy injected with the acute bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) at a single dose of 2.5 mg/kg of body weight at the 7th day of gestation. LPS increased the oxidative stress and decreased the anti-oxidant glutathione in the tissue of the LPS-treated mothers and pups. This might mediate the behavioral complications responses to the LPS in the pups born to LPS-treated mothers. The experiments indicated that LPS significantly reduced the locomotors activity of mice pups when compared with the saline-control mice. LPS was found to inhibit the sensory motor reflexes in all elements of acts and postures. Significant decreases were observed in the social contacts, threat, attack and number of fights of pups born to LPS-treated mothers. Highly distributed focal areas indicating many phagocytic activities with a marked depletion of lymphocytes was observed in section from thymus of pups born to LPS-treated mice, indicating an intense inflammation. In conclusion, prenatal LPS-induced inflammation enhanced the susceptibility to the development of neonatal systemic and behavioral disorders.
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