Article

Moiré fringes as parametric curves

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Abstract

Advantage is taken in this paper of the parametric properties of families of curves to express in a simple manner several fundamental properties of moir fringes. Attention is called, in particular, to the necessary limitations on the angle of rotation of two gratings, and on the magnitude of their difference in pitch, to obtain an easily interpretable moir-fringe pattern.

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