Article

Performance of various grapefruit ( Citrus paradisi Macf.) and pummelo ( C. maxima Merr.) cultivars under the dry tropic conditions of Mexico

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors.

Abstract

Grapefruit growers in the tropics require information about existing and new citrus cultivars with high productivity potential. The objective of this study was to determine the growth, yield, and fruit quality performance of seven pigmented and four white grapefruit cultivars under the dry tropic conditions of Colima, Mexico. The trees were budded on sour orange (Citrus aurantium L.) rootstock and planted at a distance of 8×4 m. ‘Oroblanco’ and ‘Marsh Gardner’ white-fleshed grapefruit cultivars and ‘Chandler’, a pink-fleshed pummelo, were the largest trees with the greatest height (5.0–5.6m), canopy diameter (6.2–6.3m), trunk diameter (21.9–23.3cm), and canopy volume (109–123m3). Lower height (4.3–4.8m) and canopy volume (73–96m3), but with similar canopy diameter to the previously mentioned cultivars, were recorded for the remaining pigmented cultivars. ‘Chandler’ pummelo and four pigmented grapefruit cultivars (‘Shambar’, ‘Río Red’, ‘Ray Ruby’, and ‘Redblush #3’) had yearly productions of 34.8, 34.9, 34.1, 32.7, and 30.6 tonha−1, respectively. The most productive white grapefruit cultivar was ‘Marsh Gardner’ (30.5tonha−1). Grapefruit cultivars having the largest fruit size showed a higher inverse relationship between fruit weight and yield than those with small fruit. Most genotypes had higher values of fruit weight, juice content, and maturity index than those required by the local market. The most promising grapefruit cultivars based on their acceptable growth, yield superior to 30tonha−1, and acceptable fruit color were ‘Río Red’, ‘Shambar’, ‘Ray Ruby’, and ‘Redblush #3’.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the authors.

... The fruit weight in the present study is not in agreement with the findings of Mathur and Godara (1990), Nabi et al., (2004) and Iahfaq et al., (2007). According to Rodriguez et al., (2008) fruit yield is in line (34.96 kg/ tree) with the present study, whereas findings of Singh and Dhaliwal (1980), Arora and Daulta (1982) and Sidahmed and Khalil (1997) are in contradiction with values obtained in the present findings. ...
... Peel thickness had maximum positive correlation with leaf area (0.863) and negative with height (-0.815). Rodriguez et al., (2008) had also observed significant and positive correlation for yield with fruit weight in different grapefruit cultivars. Whereas, Rabha et al., (2013) had also found significant and positive correlation for fruit yield with fruit weight in citrus species. ...
... The fruit weight in the present study is not in agreement with the findings of Mathur and Godara (1990), Nabi et al., (2004) and Iahfaq et al., (2007). According to Rodriguez et al., (2008) fruit yield is in line (34.96 kg/ tree) with the present study, whereas findings of Singh and Dhaliwal (1980), Arora and Daulta (1982) and Sidahmed and Khalil (1997) are in contradiction with values obtained in the present findings. ...
... Peel thickness had maximum positive correlation with leaf area (0.863) and negative with height (-0.815). Rodriguez et al., (2008) had also observed significant and positive correlation for yield with fruit weight in different grapefruit cultivars. Whereas, Rabha et al., (2013) had also found significant and positive correlation for fruit yield with fruit weight in citrus species. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Grape fruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) is an underutilized citrus species cultivated only in certain parts India. The present investigation was carried out at the Experimental Orchard, Regional Horticulture Research Station (RHRS), Dhaulakuan, District Sirmour (HP) and the Department of Fruit Science, Dr YS Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry Nauni, Solan (HP) during year 2013. Variability and correlation studies of two cultivars (Ruby Red and Duncan) were carried out for plant growth characters, fruit and yield characters. Cultivar Ruby Red was superior in most of the characters compared to 'Duncan' while in correlation studies there was positive correlation observed for yield per plant with fruit weight (0.892), leaf area (0.852), acidity (0.841), size of vesicle (0.820) fruit length (0.777) and fruit breadth (0.769) whereas significant and negatively correlated with seed number per fruit (-0.771).
... All the samples were of ripe fruits, but their different sizes were a result of factors such as water amounts (from soil, air, irrigation and rain), low temperatures, deficient or inappropriate plant nutrition, biological factors (plague, senile trees and excessive flowering) or tree location (BeCerrA-roDrIGuez et al., 2008;LeSTer;JIfoN;roGer, 2005;peSTANA et al., 2005). ...
... In this case, 'Lima' orange presented a reduction in the protein level despite the size increase; protein levels in 'ponkan' tangerines were very close; and for 'Natal' orange, the medium sized fruits presented the highest values followed by the small sized ones and then, by the large sized. Culture treatments, pluviosity and weather conditions may influence these values (BeCerrA-roDrIGuez et al., 2008;LeSTer;JIfoN;roGer, 2005;peSTANA et al., 2005). ...
Article
Full-text available
Citric fruits - in natura, as frozen pulp or even as juice - are one of the most important Brazilian exportation products. They are a source of ascorbic acid - a potent antioxidant, and pectin, which is used in the food industry and is an important dietary fiber. This project aims to quantify ascorbic acid and pectin contents in citric fruits, commercial oranges and tangerines, comparing them in sizes and varieties. Ascorbic acid amount was measured in juice comparing sizes, varieties and storage conditions, using a tritimetric method with 2.6-dichlorobenzenoindophenol indicator. Total and soluble pectin in each part of the fruits (peel, albedo, pulp and juice) were quantified using the polygalacturonic acid as a standard. Differences were found between the sizes. The highest content of vitamin C was found in the oranges (Bahia variety). Comparing the storage temperatures, the biggest loss was at room temperature. Albedo presented the highest content of pectin in all fruits. In juice, the total and soluble pectin contents increased as fruits size decreased. Oranges and tangerines differed in the amount of pectin.
... Dry matter content(g) at 30DAS, 60DAS and maturity, leaf area (cm 2 ) at 30DAS, 60DAS, and maturity were recorded on five randomly uprooted plants at (30 days interval) whereas canopy volume (cm 3 ): Rodríguez, et al., 2008, leaf area index (LAI): Watson (1952) at 30DAS, 60DAS and maturity, crop growth rate (CGR)(gm -2 d -1 ): Radford (1967), net assimilation rate (NAR) (gm -2 d -1 ): Williams (1946), leaf area duration (LAD) (m 2 days) between 30-60DAS and 60DAS-maturity ;Hunt (1978), protein content (%): Sahrawat et al., (2002), phenol content (mg GAE 100 -1 g): Singleton and Rossi (1965), dal cooking time (min): Sethi et al., (2014): Singh et al., (1984): Akinoso and Oladeji (2017)and dal recovery (%): Sawargaonkar (2010)were calculated methodically. Standard cultural practices were followed to maintain good crop stand. ...
... However, the highest fruit weight was found on 'Carrizo' and 'Troyer citranges' in 'Redblush' (Fallahi et al., 1989) and 'Marsh Seedless' (Mehrotra et al., 1999), on 'Palestine sweet lime', 'rough lemon ' and 'Volkameriana' in 'Frosh Marsh Seedless' (Economides and Gregoriou, 1993), on 'sour orange', ' Carrizo' and 'Troyer citranges' in 'Marsh Seedless' and 'Redblush' grapefruits (Yalcin and Hizal, 1994), and on 'Goutou' in 'Oroblanco' grapefruit hybrid (Stover et al., 2004). Lederman et al. (2005) in Brazil and Becerra- Rodríguez et al. (2008) in Mexico reported that the fruit weight of 'Rio Red' grapefruit on 'Rangpur lime' and 'sour orange' was 296.9 g and 522.3 g, Table 4. Effects of rootstocks on the juice content, total acids (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), TSS/TA ratio of the 'Rio Red' grapefruit. ...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of rootstocks such as 'sour orange' (Citrus aurantium L. var. 'Yerli'), 'Carrizo' and 'Troyer citranges' (Citrus sinensis Osb. x Poncirus trifoliata Raf), 'Smooth Flat Seville sour orange' (Citrus spp. hybrid of uncertain origin), 'Brazilian sour orange' (Citrus aurantiam L. var. 'Brasilian'), 'Volkameriana' (Citrus volkameriana Tan. and Pasq.) and 'Calamondin' (possibly Citrus reticulate var. austere×Fortunella hybrid, Swingle) on plant growth, fruit yield, and quality of 'Rio Red' grapefruit were investigated from 2008 to 2012. Rootstocks were found to have significant effects on plant growth, fruit yield, and quality. 'Rio Red' grapefruit trees budded on 'Carrizo' and 'Troyer citranges' showed higher vegetative growth parameters (canopy height, diameter, and volume) than the trees on the other rootstocks. The trees on 'Volkameriana' and 'Carrizo citrange' produced higher percentage of cumulative yield of about 55.1 and 34.3%, respectively, than the trees on 'sour orange'. 'Rio Red' grapefruit budded on 'Carrizo citrange' had higher fruit quality such as thin rind, high juice content, and more color development than the other rootstocks. 'Carrizo citrange' was the most promising rootstock for 'Rio Red' grapefruit in Dörtyol, Eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey.
... Estos datos concuerdan con los obtenidos por otros autores en zonas próximas para Star Ruby y Río Red [23,26]. En un estudio en Méjico entre numerosas variedades los índices de madurez de Río Red y Flame no presentan diferencias significativas entre ellos [27]. La evolución de la coordenada a* que nos indica la variación del color de la corteza del verde al rojo se puede ver en la Fig. 2. En ella se aprecia que Star Ruby tiene valores por encima de cero, alcanzando el máximo dos meses más tarde, cuando ya se ha producido la desverdización natural [4,11,23] como consecuencia de la bajada de las temperaturas. ...
Article
Full-text available
Flame grapefruit is a new variety of coloured grapefruit, widely cultivated in Florida, introduced recently in Spain. Star Ruby and Rio Red are two varieties usually grown in Spain. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to know which variety acquires a higher colour. The trees were planted in the Campo de Cartagena during 2008 and 2009/2010 seasons and first fruits were harvested from November to February. Fruits of both varieties were compared for colour characteristics. Preliminary results show significant differences in rind colour. Consequently, both varieties (Rio Red and Star Ruby) are totally different in rind colour, but no differences were found between the fruit endocarp.
Article
Full-text available
Four pigmented grapefruit cultivars viz. Shamber, Flame, Star Ruby and Rio Red were evaluated at Horticultural Research Station, Sahiwal (Pakistan) for their production features encompassing growth, yield and fruit characteristics. The cultivars significantly differed for the studied physical parameters i.e. yield per plant (kg), fruit weight (g), fruit length (cm), fruit breadth (cm), peel thickness (mm), peel, juice and rag contents (%)], and biochemical traits i.e. TSS (°Brix), acidity (%) and ripening index. The highest fruit yield (84.28 kg/plant) was recorded for Star Ruby and the minimum (75.00 kg/plant) was recorded for Rio Red. The maximum fruit weight (338.92 g/fruit) was noted in Rio Red, while the maximum fruit length (9.14 cm) was found in Shamber. The highest TSS was noted for Rio Red (8.32 °Brix) followed by Shamber (7.94 °Brix). The maximum fruit acidity was observed for Star Ruby (1.00%), while the minimum for Shamber (0.94%). It was concluded that four grapefruit cultivars under consideration were divergent in their performance under prevailing conditions.
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this work was to determine some fruit quality parameters of grapefruit "Citrus Paradisi Macf" including, weight, diameter, peel, seed number, juice content, titratable acidity, soluble solids, maturity index, as well as its antioxidant content. Fruits ’’Mac carty’’, ’’Natsu mikan’’, ’’Triumphe’’, ’’Marsh’’, ’’Thompson”, ’’Java’’, ’’Ruby’’ and ’’Foster’’ Collection of citrus INRA Morocco were used. In this study, we have only found that the three varieties: ’’Marsh’’, ’’Triumphe’’ and ’’Java’’ have respectively significant juice content (40.13 ± 0.090%, 39.36% and 38.57 ± 0.010 ± 0.020%) and sugar (9.47% ± 0.057, 8.70 ± 0.010% and 7, 20 ± 0.10%) but a relatively low acidity (1.56 ± 0.010%, 1.45% and 1.15 ± 0.000 ± 0.010% ). In addition, ’’Marsh’’ had a rich in caroténoïds (0.0967 ± 0.07506 mg / L) compared to ’’Triumph’’e and ’’Java’’. Moreover, in the variety ’’Natsu mikan’’ and ’’Foster’’ the concentration of ascorbic acid was much higher (592.2 mg / L and 516,53mg / L), but the caroténoïds content and sugar was low. On the other hand, the ’’Mac Carty’’ proved very rich in caroténoïds (0.1800 ± 0.01000 mg / L), acidity (1.85 ± 0.040%) and sugar (10.33 ± 0.058%). According to our results, Grapefruit ’’Marsh’’, ’’Natsu mikan’’, ’’Foster’’ and ’’Mac carty’’ have proved to be good sources of natural antioxidants among the varieties studied.
Article
Full-text available
The effects of the ‘Cleopatra’ mandarin and ‘Swingle’ citrumelo rootstocks and time of harvest on the quality of cold-stored (13°C and 90% R.H.) ‘Ruby Red’ and ‘Star Ruby’ grapefruit grown under the tropical conditions prevalent in Ceará state, Brazil, were evaluated. Fruit quality was assessed by mass loss and peel color, the percentage of juice, soluble solids, titratable acidity, pH, maturity index, and ascorbic acid content. The results suggested that ‘Ruby Red’ and ‘Star Ruby’ grapefruit presented similar amounts of soluble solids, pH, titratable acidity and ascorbic acid levels at harvest, and the trends over the course of storage followed similar patterns for both cultivars, regardless of rootstock. The influence of scion-rootstock combination on the studied variables was dependent on the time of harvest. The peel color of ‘Ruby Red’ grafted on ‘Swingle’ citrumelo is more vivid and redder when harvested in October than when harvested in August. ‘Ruby Red’ and ‘Star Ruby’ grapefruit harvested in October are sweeter, less acidic, juicier, and richer in ascorbic acid than those harvested in August. ‘Cleopatra’ mandarin rootstock might favor ascorbic acid levels at harvest, but the fruit may lose more weight during storage. © 2015, Eduem - Editora da Universidade Estadual de Maringa. All rights reserved.
Article
Full-text available
Experiment was conducted on six cultivars of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) namely, Imperial, Duncan, Foster, Marsh SL, Star Ruby and Redblush during 2009-2011. Plants of these cultivars were spaced at 4 m - 4 m apart. Fruit yield was found to be the highest (31.48 kg/tree) in Imperial followed by Foster (23.43 kg/tree). However, heaviest fruit (414.01 g) was recorded in Foster and the lowest fruit weight (282.89 g) was in Redblush. Duncan and Marsh SL had the highest juice recovery (50.00%) which was not differed significantly with Redblush (46.91%). The lowest juice recovery was found in Foster and Imperial. Imperial had thickest peel (6.99 mm) and peelthickness was least in Foster (5.30 mm). Whereas, seeds/fruit was recorded the highest in Foster and Imperial (> 44 seeds /fruit). Other cultivars like, Marsh SL, Star Ruby and Redblush had less than 5 seeds/fruit and seems to be seedless. Mean TSS was recorded maximum in Duncan (9.56%) which was at par with Marsh SL (9.53%) and Redblush (9.50%). The minmum TSS was found in Star Ruby (8.82%) which did not differ significantly with Foster. Significantly lower acidity was recorded in Marsh SL (0.81%), Imperial (0.85%) and Foster (0.94%). While maximum acidity was found in Duncan (1.09%). The higher ascorbic acid content (56.53 mg/100 ml juice) was estimated in Marsh SL followed by Foster (49.61 mg/100 ml juice). Whereas, maximum AOX activity (5.56 μ mol Trolox eq/g ) was recorded in Imperial followed by Marsh SL (5.08 μ mol Trolox eq/ g) and Redblush (4.53 μ mol Trolox eq/g). The most promising grapefruit cultivars, based on yield and quality, were Marsh SL, Redblush and Imperial.
Article
Full-text available
Pomelo [Citrus grandis (L.) Osbeck] has the largest fruit size among citrus species. There are several cultivars for pomelo species which is sensitive to low temperatures thus its cultivation is possible in relatively preserved areas in subtropical regions. The interest to pomelo production has increased due to several reasons such as, its has a little or no bitterness in fruit flesh conversaly to grapefruit, avaibility of pigmented varieties, high concentration of vitamin C, total phenolics and carotenoids in fruit flesh, as well as its efficiency in destroying free radicals such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. Several pomelo varieties have been introduced to Turkey and adaptation studies have been established. In the present study, Reinking, Pomelo WN, Kao Panne and Citrus hassaku which is a spontaneous hybrid between pomelo and mandarin were investigated in terms of fruit yield and pomological characteristics. In addition, Henderson grapefruit was included in this study in order to obtain a comparasion between pomelo and grapefruit. A large variation was observed in fruit yield of cultivars established in 2011 and 2012. In 2011, the highest yield was determined in Henderson whereas it was obtained from Citrus hassaku in 2012. Pomelo varieties yielded between 5-60 kg fruit per tree and 8.6-50 kg fruit per tree in 2011 and 2012, respectively. In terms of pomological traits, Citrus hassaku had the highest fruit weight; Pink, Kao Panne and Reinking pomelos had the highest peel thickness and Pomelo WN yielded the highest TSS/TA ratio.
Article
Full-text available
Adjacent but separate trials of 'Oroblanco' and 'Melogold', both triploid pummelo [Citrus grandis (L.) Osbeck] x grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) hybrids, were established on nine rootstocks in the Indian River citrus region of Florida in 1993. The trees on the citrandarin rootstock x639 [Cleopatra mandarin (C. reticulata Blanco) x trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata L.)] were significantly more productive than trees on any other rootstock tested for 'Oroblanco' and all rootstocks except Swingle citrumelo (C. paradisi x P. trifoliata) and Cleopatra mandarin for 'Melogold'. Cumulative production of 'Oroblanco' on x639, through year 9, was 50% higher than for Swingle or Volkamer lemon [C. limon (L.)], which were the next highest in yield. 'Melogold' displayed extremely low yield, with 45% of trees producing fewer than 50 fruit total in the 9 years of this study. Carrizo citrange (C. sinensis Osbeck x P. trifoliata) produced the smallest trees with both scion varieties, reflecting poor adaptation of this rootstock to the calcareous soil at the trial site. As expected, acidity of 'Oroblanco' and 'Melogold' was much lower than would be observed for grapefruit when fall harvested, with similar total soluble solids (TSS), and much higher TSS : titratable acidity ratio. Some rootstock effects on internal quality were observed.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The first pink pigmented grapefruit variety, Foster, was discovered in Florida in 1907 as a budsport of Walters grapefruit. The second, Thompson Pink, was also found in Florida in 1913 as a budsport on a Marsh tree. Both Marsh and Walters are derived from Duncan grapefruit. Thompson grapefruit was planted in south Texas where it produced two budsports with indistinguishable darker pink pigmented fruits, Ruby Red in 1929, and Redblush in 1931; these two were later widely planted in Texas, Florida and elsewhere. Further Thompson budsports lead to other minor darker varieties, such as Shambar (California), and Burgundy (Florida). Induced radiation mutants were produced from two Texas sources; irradiated seed of Hudson, a dark red seedy variety derived from a Foster Seedless budsport, lead to Star Ruby (1959), and irradiated nucellar Ruby Red budwood produced the non-commercial A&I 1-48 (1971), which in turn produced a darker budsport, Rio Red (1976), the main variety now grown in Texas and Mexico. Further variety development has produced several other dark red varieties: Ray Ruby, a Ruby Red budsport (Texas, 1970); Flame, a Henderson seedling (Florida, 1983); Nel Ruby, a Ray Ruby seedling (South Africa, 1987); Rouge La Toma, a Ruby Red budsport, and its own seedling, Oran Red (Argentina, 1989). Because Rio Red has some shape and late season external appearance drawbacks, an active program to find alternative varieties for Texas has been initiated. Budwood and/or seed from varieties found and developed elsewhere have been introduced, new budsports discovered on A&I 1-48 trees are being tested, plants from fruit chimeras and chromosome transfer have been established, and irradiation of budwood, seed and tissue culture of several varieties has been carried out. grown in Texas is grapefruit, all of it pigmented (da Graça and Sauls, 2000). It is estimated that pink and red varieties account for 75% of all sales of US grapefruit (Saunt, 2000). In Florida, 59% of all grapefruit propagations are now pink and red varieties (Kesinger, 2002), in Israel they constitute 52% of the plantings (M.Bar-Joseph, pers.comm.), and in South Africa pigmented types were expected to overtake white by 2003 (Stanbury, 1996). In Argentina, pink and red varieties comprise 94% of grapefruit production (Accari, 2000), in California it is approximately 95% (T.Batkin, pers.comm.), and in Turkey 70% (Anon., 2003). In Spain, dark red varieties have almost completely replaced white and even pink ones (Porras et al., 1996).
Article
Tree growth, yield, and fruit quality of nucellar `Frost Marsh Seedless' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) on 15 rootstocks were evaluated under Cyprus conditions. Over the 9-year production period, trees on Palestine sweet lime, the group of rough lemon, and Citrus volkameriana Pasq. were more productive per unit of tree size, and their cumulative yields per tree were significantly higher than those of trees on sour orange, which is the standard rootstock commercially used in Cyprus. Rootstocks affected fruit size and weight, rind thickness, juice content, total soluble solids concentration (SSC), and total acids, but the differences were not large enough to affect the market value of the fruit, On the basis of the results of this trial and because sour orange is highly susceptible to tristeza, the C. volkameriana and rough lemon group, which are tolerant to tristeza, should be included in further trial plantings as a potential commercial rootstock.
Climate and citrus behaviour The citrus industry Sistema de información agropecuaria de con-sulta The grapefruit Citrus varie-ties of the world. Sinclair International Limited, England, 128 pp Sinclair WB (1972) The grapefruit physiology and products. University of California
  • R Walheim
R, Walheim L (1980) Citrus: how to select, grow and enjoy. Horticultural Publishing Co. Inc. 176 pp Reuther W (1973) Climate and citrus behaviour. In: Reuther W, Webber HJ, Batchelor L (eds) The citrus industry, vol 3, Div. Agric. Sci., University of California, Berkeley, pp 280–337 Sagarpa (2006) Sistema de información agropecuaria de con-sulta. SIACON Saunt J (1990) The grapefruit. In: Truman K (ed) Citrus varie-ties of the world. Sinclair International Limited, England, 128 pp Sinclair WB (1972) The grapefruit physiology and products. University of California, Division of Agricultural Sciences, 600 pp Soler AJ (1999) Reconocimiento de Variedades de Cítricos en Campo. Generalitat Valenciana. Conselleria de Agricul-tura, Pesca y Alimentación. 187 pp Soost RK, Cameron JW (1980) 'Oroblanco', a triploid pum-melo-grapefruit hybrid. HortScience 15:667–669
Grapefruit cultivar evaluation Growth yield and fruit quality of nucellar frost 'Marsh' grapefruit on Wfteen root-stock in Cyprus Citrus fruit and processing Development of seedless grapefruit cultivars through budwood irradiation Mutation breeding and the development of the 'Star Ruby' grapefruit
  • Lc
  • Da Banzatto
  • Sempionato Or
  • Enciso Cr Economides Cv
  • Gregoriou
LC, Banzatto DA, Sempionato OR, Enciso CR (1996) Grapefruit cultivar evaluation. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:207–209 Economides CV, Gregoriou C (1993) Growth yield and fruit quality of nucellar frost 'Marsh' grapefruit on Wfteen root-stock in Cyprus. J Am Soc Hort Sci 118:326–329 FAO (2004) Citrus fruit and processing. Annual Statistics FAO. Vialle delle Terme di Caracalla, 0100, Roma, 39 pp Hearn CJ (1986) Development of seedless grapefruit cultivars through budwood irradiation. J Am Soc Hort Sci 111:304–306 Hensz AR (1977) Mutation breeding and the development of the 'Star Ruby' grapefruit. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:282–285
Performance of nine grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) cultivars under hot, subtropical southern African conditions Evaluation of rootstocks for grapefruit in South Africa Citrus culture in high altitude American tropics
  • Barry Gh Veldman
  • Fj
Barry GH, Veldman FJ (1996) Performance of nine grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) cultivars under hot, subtropical southern African conditions. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:113–115 Breedt HJ, Koekemoer PJJ (1996) Evaluation of rootstocks for grapefruit in South Africa. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:164–166 Camacho BSE (1981) Citrus culture in high altitude American tropics. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:321–325
Citrus rootstock trials in Sardinia: preliminary results on the performance of ten rootstocks for 'Navel' and 'Valencia' orange and for 'Marsh' grapefruit Texas citriculture––past and present The origins of red pigmented grapefruits and the development of new varie-ties
  • Fg
  • P Deidda
  • Fray Am Da Graca Jv
  • Sauls Jw Da Graca Jv
  • Es Louzada
  • Sauls
FG, Deidda P, Fray AM (1981) Citrus rootstock trials in Sardinia: preliminary results on the performance of ten rootstocks for 'Navel' and 'Valencia' orange and for 'Marsh' grapefruit. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:119–123 da Graca JV, Sauls JW (2000) Texas citriculture––past and present. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:451 da Graca JV, Louzada ES, Sauls JW (2004) The origins of red pigmented grapefruits and the development of new varie-ties. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:369–374
Pummelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) germplasm in Funjian: an important production region. 2000 Int Soc Citriculture Congress Honyou " : a red color mutant of Pummelo Grapefruit from the Isle of youth
  • Z C Chunling
  • S Qinliang
  • H Sunhua
  • L Dogmei
  • C Jianmei
  • Zhenguang
  • A Pardo
  • C Martínez
  • Betancourt
Z, Chunling C, Qinliang S, Sunhua H, Dogmei L, Jianmei C, Zhenguang C (2000) Pummelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) germplasm in Funjian: an important production region. 2000 Int Soc Citriculture Congress. Orlando Florida, pp 124 (Program and Abstract) Lins SQ, Zhang QY (2000) " Honyou " : a red color mutant of Pummelo. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:212 (abstract) Pardo A, Martínez C, Betancourt M, Del Val I, Estévez-Sanchez I, López A, Proenza M (1992) Grapefruit from the Isle of youth. Proc Int Soc Citriculture 1:108–109
Citrus culture in high altitude American tropics
  • Bse Camacho
Evaluation of rootstocks for grapefruit in South Africa
  • H J Breedt
  • Pjj Koekemoer
  • HJ Breedt
Mutation breeding and the development of the ‘Star Ruby’ grapefruit
  • A R Hensz
  • AR Hensz
Pummelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) germplasm in Funjian: an important production region
  • Z Lai
  • C Chunling
  • S Qinliang
  • H Sunhua
  • L Dogmei
  • C Jianmei
  • C Zhenguang
Grapefruit from the Isle of youth
  • A Pardo
  • C Martínez
  • M Betancourt
  • Del Val
  • I Estévez-Sanchez
  • I López
  • A Proenza
Evaluation of grapefruit and Valencia cultivars in South Africa
  • C F Human
  • P J Steenekamp
  • C J Snyman
  • Jgj Maritz
  • CF Human
Citrus rootstock trials in Sardinia: preliminary results on the performance of ten rootstocks for ‘Navel’ and ‘Valencia’ orange and for ‘Marsh’ grapefruit
  • F G Crescimanno
  • P Deidda
  • A M Fray
  • FG Crescimanno
Grapefruit cultivar evaluation
  • L C Donadio
  • D A Banzatto
  • O R Sempionato
  • C R Enciso
  • LC Donadio
Honyou”: a red color mutant of Pummelo
  • S Q Lins
  • Q Y Zhang
  • SQ Lins
The grapefruit Citrus varieties of the world
  • J Saunt
Agronomical behaviour of seven commercial citrus varieties cultivated in Spain
  • S Zaragoza
  • I Trenor
  • F Medina
  • E Alonso
Citrus: how to select, grow and enjoy
  • R Ray
  • L Walheim
The grapefruit physiology and products
  • W B Sinclair
Reconocimiento de Variedades de Cítricos en Campo. Generalitat Valenciana. Conselleria de Agricultura, Pesca y Alimentación
  • A J Soler
Citrus fruit and processing. Annual Statistics FAO. Vialle delle Terme di Caracalla, 0100
  • Fao
Sistema de información agropecuaria de consulta
  • Sagarpa