Article

Inflorescence and leaves essential oil composition of hydroponically grown Osimum basilicum L.

Journal of the Serbian Chemical Society (Impact Factor: 0.87). 05/2010; 75(10):1361-1368. DOI: 10.2298/JSC100311113H

ABSTRACT

Abstract: In order to characterize the essential oils of leaves and inflorescences, water distilled volatile oils of hydroponically grown Ocimum basilicum L. were analyzed by GC/EI-MS. Fifty components were identified in the inflorescence and leaf essential oils of the basil plants, accounting for 98.8 and 99.9 % of the total quantified components respectively. Phenylpropanoids (37.7 % for the inflorescence vs. 58.3 % for the leaves) were the predominant class of oil cons- tituents, followed by sesquiterpenes (33.3 vs. 19.4 %) and monoterpenes (27.7
vs. 22.1 %). Of the monoterpenoid compounds, oxygenated monoterpenes (25.2 vs. 18.9 %) were the main subclass. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (25 vs. 15.9 %) were the main subclass of sesquiterpenoidal compounds. Methyl cha- vicol, a phenylpropane derivative, (37.2 vs. 56.7 %) was the principle com- ponent of both organ oils, with up to 38 and 57 % of the total identified components of the inflorescence and leaf essential oils, respectively. Linalool (21.1 vs. 13.1 %) was the second common major component followed by α- cadinol (6.1 vs. 3 %), germacrene D (6.1 vs. 2.7 %) and 1,8-cineole (2.4 vs. 3.5 %). There were significant quantitative but very small qualitative differences between the two oils. In total, considering the previous reports, it seems that essential oil composition of hydroponically grown O. basilicum L. had volatile constituents comparable with field grown counterparts, probably with potential applicability in the pharmaceutical and food industries.

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Available from: Mohammad Bagher Hassanpouraghdam
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    • "Furthermore, an increased supply of Zn did not affect the content of flavone apigenin and coumarin herniarin in aforementioned study. Regarding the main components of essential oil it seems that there is some discrepancy and/or similarity between present study and reports of other scientists from elsewhere (cited in Hassanpouraghdam et al., 2009 & 2010). "
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    • "Furthermore, an increased supply of Zn did not affect the content of flavone apigenin and coumarin herniarin in aforementioned study. Regarding the main components of essential oil it seems that there is some discrepancy and/or similarity between present study and reports of other scientists from elsewhere (cited in Hassanpouraghdam et al., 2009 & 2010). "
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    ABSTRACT: Essential oils composition of hydroponically grown Ocimum basilicum L. plant was evaluated in response to salinity (control and 50 mM NaCl) and Zn foliar application (control, 100 and 200 mg l-1). Essential oil constituents were quantified and identified by GC/EI-MS. In total, fifty seven components were identified in the six treatment combinations. Methyl chavicol (43.9–61.2 %) and linalool (11.4-16%) were the major components of all treatments. Salinity had deteriorative effect on methyl chavicol biosynthesis and accumulation. In contrast, integrated levels of salinity and 200 mgl-1 Zn had increment effects on linalool content. Germacrene D (2.2-3.9 %), 1,8-cineole (2.4-3.8 %), (Z)-α-bergamotene (0.1-2.6 %), (E)-β farnesene (1.4-2.6 %), α-bulnesene (0.9-2.4 %), camphor (0.7-1.3 %) and (E)-β-ocimene (0.2-1.3 %) were the other main common constituents of oil. Considering the constant levels of zinc foliar application, salinity had raising effects on the contents of most above mentioned constituents. In conclusion, it seems that moderate salinity stress along with balanced levels of Zn foliar application changed the primary metabolites pathways in favor of major volatile oil components biosynthesis and that basil plant has the production potential under prevalent semi-saline conditions.
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    ABSTRACT: Ocimum basilicum L. (sweet basil) belongs to family Lamiaceae. The family Lamiaceae comprises the most employed medicinal plants as a worldwide source of spices and also as a consolidated source of extracts. The chemical composition of sweet basil essential oil has been investigated and by now more than 200 chemical components have been reported from many regions of the world. The chemical constituents showed the presence of monoterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpene, sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, oxygenated sesquiterpene, triterpene, flavanoids, aromatic compounds, etc. The compounds have been reported to exhibit antibacterial and antifungal, antiproliferative/anticancer, antidyspepsia, antigiardial, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, antiulcer, antiviral, insecticidal and wound-healing activities. They also showed antiwormal response, cardiac stimulant, effects on CNS, hypoglycaemic and hypolipidemic effects and inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Various parts of the plant of O. basilicum (sweet basil) have been widely used in traditional medicine. Leaves and flowering parts of O. basilicum are traditionally used as antispasmodic, aromatic, carminative, digestive, galactogogue, stomachic and tonic agent. They have also been used as a folk remedy to treat various ailments such as feverish illness, poor digestion, nausea, abdominal cramps, gastro-enteritis, migraine, insomnia, depression, gonorrhea, dysentery and chronic diarrhea exhaustion. Externally, they have been applied for the treatment of acne, loss of smell, insect stings, snake bites and skin infections.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Asian Journal of Chemistry
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