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    ABSTRACT: Background: The aim of the present study was to appraise the comparative ability of different ACEF models incorporating glomerular filtration rate or creatinine clearance estimated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease [ACEFMDRD] or Cokcroft-Gault [ACEFCG] equations, respectively, over the original ACEF score (ACEFSrCr) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: A total of 537 patients were analyzed by different measures of discrimination, calibration and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Results: A significant gradient in all-cause mortality was consistently seen with all the models at 30 days, 1 year and 5 years. The comparison of the three models showed that the best balance in terms of discrimination and calibration for all-cause mortality was offered by the ACEFCG at 30 days, the ACEFMDRD at 1 year and similarly by the ACEFCG and ACEFMDRD at 5 years. At 30 days, the NRI was +32.9% for ACEFMDRD over ACEFSrCr and +16% for ACEFCG over ACEFSrCr. At 1 year, the NRI was 13.8% for ACEFMDRD over ACEFSrCr and -7.8% for ACEFCG over ACEFSrCr. At 5 years, the NRI was +7.7% for both the ACEFMDRD and the ACEFCG over the ACEFSrCr. Conclusions: In patients undergoing PCI, the ACEF score is associated with satisfactory early-, mid- and long-term discrimination regardless of the definition of renal function. However, incorporating glomerular filtration rate or creatinine clearance by the MDRD or CG formulas in the ACEF score yields superior calibration compared with the original SrCr-based equation, with the ACEFMDRD displaying superior reclassification ability over the ACEFCG and ACEFSrCr at 30 days and 1 year.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · International journal of cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Early statin treatment has beneficial effects on the prognosis after acute coronary syndromes. We investigated the impact of prior statin treatment on the outcome of patients without a prior history of coronary artery disease (CAD) who presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and were treated with thrombolysis. Methods: The study enrolled 1032 consecutive patients who satisfied the above criteria. They were categorized into two groups, based on their prior statin treatment for at least 3 months before admission: the statinpretreatment group (n=124) and the statin-naïve group (n=908). All patients received high-dose statins during hospitalization and were prescribed statins after discharge. The primary outcome was the incidence of successful thrombolysis, as expressed by the percentage of patients with ≥50% ST-segment resolution and complete retrosternal pain resolution at 90 minutes. Secondary outcomes included reduction in highsensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and CK-MB levels, and in-hospital, short- and long-term cardiovascular mortality. Results: ST-segment resolution ≥50% was observed in 63.7% of the statin-pretreatment group and in 49.1% of statin-naïve patients (p<0.01). Statin pretreatment was associated with lower hs-CRP and peak CK-MB levels (p<0.001). The statin-pretreatment group had lower 30-day mortality (5.6% vs. 12.3%, p<0.05), whereas no significant differences were detected in in-hospital or 3-year mortality. Conclusions: Prior statin treatment in patients without a history of CAD who present with STEMI is associated with successful thrombolysis, decreased systemic inflammation, a lesser degree of myocardial damage, and a possible reduction in short-term mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · Hellenic journal of cardiology: HJC = Hellēnikē kardiologikē epitheōrēsē
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    ABSTRACT: Early statin treatment has beneficial effects on the prognosis after acute coronary syndromes. We investigated the impact of prior statin treatment on the outcome of patients without a prior history of coronary artery disease (CAD) who presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and were treated with thrombolysis. The study enrolled 1032 consecutive patients who satisfied the above criteria. They were categorized into two groups, based on their prior statin treatment for at least 3 months before admission: the statinpretreatment group (n=124) and the statin-naïve group (n=908). All patients received high-dose statins during hospitalization and were prescribed statins after discharge. The primary outcome was the incidence of successful thrombolysis, as expressed by the percentage of patients with 50% ST-segment resolution and complete retrosternal pain resolution at 90 minutes. Secondary outcomes included reduction in highsensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and CK-MB levels, and in-hospital, short- and long-term cardiovascular mortality. ST-segment resolution 50% was observed in 63.7% of the statin-pretreatment group and in 49.1% of statin-naïve patients (p<0.01). Statin pretreatment was associated with lower hs-CRP and peak CK-MB levels (p<0.001). The statin-pretreatment group had lower 30-day mortality (5.6% vs. 12.3%, p<0.05), whereas no significant differences were detected in in-hospital or 3-year mortality. Prior statin treatment in patients without a history of CAD who present with STEMI is associated with successful thrombolysis, decreased systemic inflammation, a lesser degree of myocardial damage, and a possible reduction in short-term mortality.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013
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