Article

Translation and validation of the Chinese-Cantonese version of the Exercise of Self-Care Agency Scale

The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.
International journal of nursing studies (Impact Factor: 2.9). 05/2012; 49(9):1122-37. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2012.04.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Effective self-care is important in the management of dysmenorrhea. Yet measures of adolescents' capabilities or self-care agency to exercise self-care to cope with dysmenorrhea are limited in the Chinese population.
The aims of this study were to translate the Exercise of Self-Care Agency Scale (ESCAS) from English into Chinese-Cantonese, and to evaluate its reliability and validity in the Chinese adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea.
This study consisted of three phases. In phase 1, the ESCAS was translated into Chinese-Cantonese using Brislin's (1986) translation and back-translation method, the semantic equivalence and content validity were assessed. In phase 2, a cross-over design was used to assess the translation adequacy of the Chinese-Cantonese version. In phase 3, the psychometric properties of the Chinese-Cantonese version were tested with a convenience sample of 477 adolescent girls recruited from three secondary schools. The reliability was assessed by internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The construct validity was tested using exploratory factor analysis.
The semantic equivalence and content validity index of the Chinese-Cantonese version of ESCAS was satisfactory. Results also indicated that the Chinese-Cantonese version had a high level of equivalence with the original English version and demonstrated a high internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Exploratory factor analysis revealed the presence of four factors supporting the conceptual dimension of the original instrument.
The current study provides initial psychometric properties of the Chinese-Cantonese version of the ESCAS and supports it as a reliable and valid instrument to measure self-care agency in adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea. It provides health care professionals with a useful tool to assess the extent to which adolescent girls take action towards their problem of dysmenorrhea.

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    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · International journal of nursing studies
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo test a hypothesized model that examines the relationship between selected basic conditioning factors, self-care agency, and self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea using Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory as a framework.DesignThis was a predictive correlational study conducted with a total of 531 secondary school girls.Methods Self-care agency, self-care behaviors, and 11 variables that have been theoretically or empirically justified in previous studies as relevant to basic conditioning factors were selected and collected by means of structured questionnaires. Path analyses were performed to test the hypothesized linkages among variables.FindingsPath analysis revealed that age and received menstrual education had both direct and indirect effects through self-care agency on self-care behaviors. Mother's and father's educational level, pain intensity, and self-medication used when experiencing dysmenorrhea only affected the self-care behaviors directly.Conclusions This is the first study that provided information about the relationship between basic conditioning factors, self-care agency, and self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea. Knowledge of the factors influencing self-care behaviors in these adolescent girls will assist healthcare professionals in developing effective interventions to promote self-care and ameliorate the adverse impact of this condition.Clinical RelevanceInterventional strategies that aim at promoting self-care behaviors among adolescent girls with dysmenorrhea should strengthen girls’ self-care agency and should target those with a younger age, higher pain intensity, mother with a higher educational level, father with a lower educational level, and those who do not take self-medication for dysmenorrhea.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of Nursing Scholarship