Left-sided gastroschisis with placenta findings: Case report and literature review

ArticleinInternational journal of clinical and experimental pathology 5(3):243-6 · January 2012with33 Reads
Source: PubMed
Abstract
Gastroschisis is a congenital abdominal-wall defect that typically occurs to the right of the umbilicus. Only twenty-one cases of left-sided gastroschisis have been described in the literature. Here we report a large left-sided gastroschisis with pulmonary hypoplasia, scoliosis, ventricular septal defect and absence of gallbladder. Section of placental membranes revealed vacuolization of the amnion, without increased macrophage infiltration of the chorion. Postmortem comparative genomic hybridization micro array did not identify a specific genetic abnormality. Some of the previously reported cases were complicated by additional abnormalities and comparisons with these cases are discussed.
    • "and an average birth weight of 2,200 g (range: 1,900-2,900). In all cases the wall defect was right located, confirming the extreme rarity of left locations [20] or even vanishing forms [21]. More than an infant presented at birth malformations associated with gastroschisis: intestinal malrotation (1/5), umbilical hernia (1/5), patent ductus arteriosus (1/5); intestinal aganglia (1/5). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Gastroschisis is an abdominal wall defect, typically located to the right of the umbilical cord, requiring an early surgical treatment shortly after birth. Affected patients can be identified during intrauterine life with US and should be delivered in referral hospitals where a multisciplinary approach can be provided, involving neonatologists, clinical geneticists, surgeons and other specialists. These patients require a complex management in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and a long term follow-up after discharge. Exceed the acute neonatal condition, gastroschisis has a good prognosis, if there are no overlapping complications, and it should be differentiated from omphalocele, burdened with worse prognosis, and other conditions in the wide spectrum of abdominal wall defects.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We report a baby boy with gastroschisis with left non-palpable undescended testis who had a defect on the left side of an intact and normal umbilical cord and had associated testicular atrophy and abnormalities of the ductus deferens. They were successfully managed by primary repair and had uneventful recovery. Subsequent inguinal exploration confirmed blind ending vas deferens and vanishing left undescended testis. Our case confirms vascular accidents at the narrow abdominal wall defect can lead to vanishing testis following attempts at closing gastroschisis making the defect narrow and compromising the blood supply to the testis.
    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2013 · BMJ Case Reports
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We report a baby boy with gastroschisis with left non-palpable undescended testis who had a defect on the left side of an intact and normal umbilical cord and had associated testicular atrophy and abnormalities of the ductus deferens. They were successfully managed by primary repair and had uneventful recovery. Subsequent inguinal exploration confirmed blind ending vas deferens and vanishing left undescended testis. Our case confirms vascular accidents at the narrow abdominal wall defect can lead to vanishing testis following attempts at closing gastroschisis making the defect narrow and compromising the blood supply to the testis.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013
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