Article

Aurones: Interesting Natural and Synthetic Compounds with Emerging Biological Potential

Laboratoire d'Ingenierie Moléculaire et Biochimie Pharmacologique, Institut Jean Barriol, Université Paul Verlaine-Metz, 1 Boulevard Arago, 57070 Metz, France.
Natural product communications (Impact Factor: 0.91). 03/2012; 7(3):389-94.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aurones [2-benzylidenebenzofuran-3(2H)-ones] are either natural or synthetic compounds, belonging to the flavonoid family. They are isomeric to flavones and provide a bright yellow color to the plants in which they occur. Today, a literature survey indicates that the related flavonoids have been studied not only for their physiological properties and effects on Nature, but also for their therapeutic potential. Aurones are recently attracting the interest of an increasing number of research groups, and, since the last review, some interesting advances have been made in understanding the aurones. In this review, we report the recent advances made on the synthetic routes towards aurones. We also highlight their activity in different biological areas, as well as applied genetic plant modifications to produce these colored compounds. Their synthesis, structure-activity relationships and the importance of the substitution pattern will also be mentioned. Finally, some aspects regarding the possible development of aurones will be discussed briefly.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Marc F Diederich
  • Source
    • "These compounds act on a number of therapeutic targets, including processes involved in cancer development and progression (Gaascht et al. 2010; Lee et al. 2015; Muller et al. 2015; Sawadogo et al. 2012, 2015; Teiten et al. 2013). Among the vast natural chemical library, we can note isolated plant substances, such as curcumin (Teiten et al. 2010, 2011), aurones (Zwergel et al. 2012), plumbagin (Gaascht et al. 2014) and fungal secondary metabolites embellicines (Ebrahim et al. 2013), which were recently investigated for their chemopreventive and anticancer properties. According to a legend, Kaldi, a goat herder living in Abyssinia or current-day Northern Ethiopia discovered coffee when he noticed the excited nature of his goats after they had consumed the red berries that had fallen from a shrub. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Coffee is the second most popular beverage in the world after water with a consumption of approximately two billion cups per day. Due to its low cost and ease of preparation, it is consumed in almost all countries and by all social classes of the population through different modes of preparation. Despites its simple appearance, a cup of coffee is in fact a complex mixture that contains hundreds of molecules, the composition and concentration of which vary widely and depend on factors including the origin of the coffee tree or its metabolism. Although an excessive consumption of coffee can be harmful, many molecules that are present in this black decoction exert anticancer properties. This review aims to describe the different primary coffee-containing substances that exert chemopreventive and bioactive activities against the different hallmarks and enabling characteristics of cancer, thus explaining the anticancer health benefit of black coffee.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Genes & Nutrition
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aurones [2-benzylidenebenzofuran-3(2H)-ones] are either natural or synthetic compounds, belonging to the flavonoid family. They are isomeric to flavones and provide a bright yellow color to the plants in which they occur. Today, a literature survey indicates that the related flavonoids have been studied not only for their physiological properties and effects on Nature, but also for their therapeutic potential. Aurones are recently attracting the interest of an increasing number of research groups, and, since the last review, some interesting advances have been made in understanding the aurones. In this review, we report the recent advances made on the synthetic routes towards aurones. We also highlight their activity in different biological areas, as well as applied genetic plant modifications to produce these colored compounds. Their synthesis, structure–activity relationships and the importance of the substitution pattern will also be mentioned. Finally, some aspects regarding the possible development of aurones will be discussed briefly.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The health-promoting property of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is based, in part, on the additive and synergistic effects of multiple antioxidants. In an attempt to further enhance food quality, we introduced into crops the capability to synthesize a yellow antioxidant, aureusidin, that is normally produced only by some ornamental plants. For this purpose, the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) chalcone 4'-O-glucosyltransferase (Am4'CGT) and aureusidin synthase (AmAs1) genes, which catalyse the synthesis of aureusidin from chalcone, were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) plants that displayed a functionally active chalcone/flavanone biosynthetic pathway. Leaves of the resulting transgenic plants developed a yellow hue and displayed higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibiting and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) activities than control leaves. Our results suggest that the nutritional qualities of leafy vegetables can be enhanced through the introduction of aurone biosynthetic pathways.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2012 · Plant Biotechnology Journal
Show more