Mood Symptoms After Natural Menopause and Hysterectomy With and Without Bilateral Oophorectomy Among Women in Midlife

Article (PDF Available)inObstetrics and Gynecology 119(5):935-41 · May 2012with24 Reads
DOI: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31824f9c14 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
To examine whether mood symptoms increased more for women in the years after hysterectomy with or without bilateral oophorectomy relative to natural menopause. Using data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (n=1,970), depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed annually for up to 10 years with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Index and four anxiety questions, respectively. Piece-wise hierarchical growth models were used to relate natural menopause, hysterectomy with ovarian conservation, and hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy to trajectories of mood symptoms before and after the final menstrual period or surgery. Covariates included educational attainment, race, menopausal status, age the year before final menstrual period or surgery, and time-varying body mass index, self-rated health, hormone therapy, and antidepressant use. By the tenth annual visit, 1,793 (90.9%) women reached natural menopause, 76 (3.9%) reported hysterectomy with ovarian conservation, and 101 (5.2%) reported hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy. For all women, depressive and anxiety symptoms decreased in the years after final menstrual period or surgery. These trajectories did not significantly differ by hysterectomy or oophorectomy status. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Index means were 0.72 standard deviations lower and anxiety symptoms were 0.67 standard deviations lower 5 years after final menstrual period or surgery. In this study, mood symptoms continued to improve after the final menstrual period or hysterectomy for all women. Women who undergo a hysterectomy with or without bilateral oophorectomy in midlife do not experience more negative mood symptoms in the years after surgery. II.