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Engineering Education at a Crossroad

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... Supporting the individual efforts of all of those students in 50 minute daily time periods is a herculean task. In undergraduate education, where becoming a skilled practitioner in the classic apprenticeship model is often an explicit goal (Augustine & Vest, 1994;Coleman, 1996;Dixon, 1991), the even greater numbers of students (e.g., 75 to 200 or more students) and even smaller time periods (e.g., two or three meetings per week) make a traditional apprenticeship model seem impossible. ...
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Information, Knowledge and National Power
  • J H Holloman
  • R Research
  • Development