Conference Paper

Landmarks Selection Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

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Abstract

In this paper, we propose a distributed, self-organized landmarks selection algorithm that ensures different patterns of landmarks spread throughout deployment area of a wireless sensor network. The algorithm is highly scalable through decentralized implementation with low time and memory complexity. The proposed technique represents an optimal complexity algorithm for virtual coordinates routing protocols in large-scale wireless sensor networks, and our simulations show that it improves significantly virtual coordinates routing protocols performance, preserving the simplicity and high scalability of this routing method.

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... The landmark selection problem has itself been the subject of much work as for small numbers of landmarks it can have a large impact on any triangulation based methods [23][13][24]. Various heuristics have been proposed which attempt to select landmarks spread throughout the network with a uniform distribution. ...
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