Conference Paper

High Efficiency Compact High Voltage Vector Inversion Generators

Authors:
  • Hyperion Technology Group, Inc.
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Abstract

Vector Inversion Generators, VIG, were invented by Fitch and Howell<sup>1</sup>. The spiral-line VIG takes electrostatically stored energy and converts it into a fast rising high voltage pulse in a dynamic two component, one-step process. We present the results for a variety of units operating over a wide range of parameters. The highest voltage achieved in a single ultra-compact unit has been 500 kV in a device that is 8 inches long and 5 inches in diameter. Two of these units have been operated in tandem to produce a 1 MV pulse generator that failed after about 10 cycles. Finally, we discuss the range of loads that can be driven by this dynamic device in terms of the VIG dynamics and the RC time constant for the load.

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