Conference Paper

Application Level Energy and Performance Measurements in a Wireless LAN

Univ. of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, UK
DOI: 10.1109/GreenCom.2011.26 Conference: Green Computing and Communications (GreenCom), 2011 IEEE/ACM International Conference on
Source: IEEE Xplore

ABSTRACT

We present an experimental evaluation of energy usage and performance in a wireless LAN cell based on a test bed using the 5 GHz ISM band for 802.11a and 802.11n. We have taken an application-level approach, by varying the packet size and transmission rate at the protocol level and evaluating energy usage across a range of application transmission rates using both large and small packet sizes. We have observed that both the application's transmission rate and the packet size have an impact on energy efficiency for transmission in our test bed. We also included in our experiments evaluation of the energy efficiency of emulations of YouTube and Skype flows, and a comparison with Ethernet transmissions.

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    • "We also provide examples of how our findings can be exploited in order to allow applications to trade off performance against energy usage, but different mechanisms may apply to different classes of applications. Although our experiments were carried out for a WLAN cell, as we are observing the amortisation of the energy/transmission costs of the end-system, the results are also found to be similar for wired Ethernet [11]. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2013
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    • "We then compare these to a performance envelope, based on the operation of a single client, generated on an IEEE 802.11n/g testbed. While we have constrained ourselves to 802.11g and 802.11n for practical purposes (e.g. the network configuration of the University of Twente deployment), our methodology for generating the performance envelopes has been applied to other IEEE 802.11 variants in our previous work [2], [3]. The considered GoAs are: real-time audio, realtime video, streamed (non-real-time) audio, streamed video and bulk data transfers. "
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    ABSTRACT: We demonstrate that in a future converged network scenario, it may be beneficial to allow selection of 802.11 variant based on application requirements. We analyse traces from the campus network from the University of Twente, comprising ∼5000 users. We have evaluated a performance envelope derived from testbed experiments for individual IEEE 802.11 variants and compare these with the traffic patterns from the campus network. From our comparison, we find that specific IEEE 802.11 variants (e.g. 802.11g or 802.11n) may be better suited to specific applications, such as video streaming, rather than using a single WLAN standard for all traffic.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jan 2013
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    • "We also provide examples of how our findings can be exploited in order to allow applications to trade off performance against energy usage, but different mechanisms may apply to different classes of applications. Although our experiments were carried out for a WLAN cell, as we are observing the amortisation of the energy/transmission costs of the end-system, the results are also found to be similar for wired Ethernet [11]. "
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated the scope for enabling WLAN applications to manage the trade-off between performance and energy usage. We have conducted measurements of energy usage and performance in our 802.11n WLAN testbed, which operates in the 5 GHz ISM band. We have defined an effective energy usage envelope with respect to application-level packet transmission, and we demonstrate how performance as well as the effective energy usage envelope is effected by various configurations of IEEE 802.11n, including transmission power levels and channel width. Our findings show that the packet size and packet rate of the application flow have the greatest impact on application-level energy usage, compared to transmission power and channel width. As well as testing across a range of packet sizes and packet rates, we emulate a Skype flow, a YouTube flow and file transfers (HTTP over Internet and local server) to place our results in context. Based on our measurements we discuss approaches and potential improvements of management in effective energy usage for the tested applications.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012
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