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Reflections on the Evaluation of Adaptive Learning Technologies

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Abstract

The key characteristic of adaptive learning technologies implies specific challenges for evaluation. Despite an increasing awareness of the need for sound evaluations, the current evaluation practice still suggests considerable weaknesses in the approaches applied and calls for further research on appropriate and sophisticated evaluation methodologies. This paper aims at further advancing the maturity of evaluation approaches for adaptive (learning) technologies by stimulating discussion and dialogue on future research directions.
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