Conference Paper

High-rate maximum runlength constrained coding schemes using base conversion

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Abstract

We will study simple and systematic constructions of high-rate binary maximum runlength constrained codes, which are based on base conversion, where specific subsequences are disallowed. We will compare the error propagation performance of base-change codes with that of prior art codes.

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