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Towards a performance measurement reference model for software product management

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Abstract

The success of any software company heavily depends on the quality and performance of its product management. Several researchers have focused on identifying and describing best-practice reference processes for software product management (SPM). Performance measurement is a pre-condition for process excellence. Therefore, it is crucial to establish an appropriate performance measurement for SPM. In this paper, we present our ongoing work with the goal of establishing performance measurement reference models for software product management.

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Chapter
This chapter describes in detail the tasks that we have designated as pertaining to software product management. These tasks remain the same regardless of whether or not software product management is a separate organizational unit within an organization (see chapter 6). They arise whenever a company or a business unit develops and markets software products (as defined in chapter 2). How the various tasks are weighted will depend on the type of company concerned and on its software products. This is shown in section 6.4 which can also serve as a roadmap to chapter 4 for readers who only want to read the sections directly relevant to them. After discussing the objectives and the role of a software product manager, we will introduce our Software Product Management Framework in section 4.3 that provides the structure for the rest of the chapter.
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Conceptual Modeling for Novel Application Domains
  • Framework
Framework, " Conceptual Modeling for Novel Application Domains, 2003, pp. 80-91.