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Abstract

Shufelt et al.,1 claim that red wine drinking does not appear to increase breast cancer risk. In the corresponding news release (cedars-sinai.edu/About-Us/News/News-Releases-2012/Moderate-Red-Wine-Drinking-May-Help-Cut-Womens-Breast-Cancer-Risk-Cedars-Sinai-Study-Shows.aspx), it was even suggested that drinking red wine in moderation may reduce one of the risk factors for breast cancer, providing a natural weapon to combat a major cause of death among U.S. women. We disagree with the statements made in the article and press release.

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... MeD diet decreases inflammation, maintains healthy weight (Boeing et al. 2012), and reduces carcinogens in the GI tract, and also the limited intake of red meat nullifies the risk. The benefits of red wine (alcohol) are limited depending on moderate consumption (Lachenmeier and Rehm 2012;Lee et al. 2007). Some study has shown the inverse relation of MeD and colorectal cancer (Farinetti et al. 2017;Schwingshackl and Hoffmann 2015). ...
Chapter
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