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Hazardous effect of tannery solid waste leachates on development and reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster: 70kDa heat shock protein as a marker of cellular damage

Electron Microscopy Unit, Central Drug Research Institute, Chattar Manzil, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226 001, Uttar Pradesh, India
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety (Impact Factor: 2.76). 08/2009; 72(6):1652-1662. DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2009.06.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Rapid industrialization has increased the burden of chemicals in the environment. These chemicals may be harmful to development and reproduction of any organism. We therefore analyzed the adverse effects of leachates from a tannery solid waste on development and reproduction using Drosophila. We show a significant delay in mean emergence of flies observed at the higher concentrations of the leachates, indicating their effect on the organism's development. Significant leachate-induced effect on reproduction of the organism was also observed. Sub-organismal analyses revealed Hsp70 expression and tissue damage in a sex-specific manner. Refractoriness of Hsp70 expression in accessory glands of male flies and ovaries of females was concurrent with tissue damage. Genes encoding certain seminal proteins (Acp70A and Acp36DE) from accessory glands were significantly down-regulated at higher concentrations of the leachates. The study suggests that (i) sub-organismal adverse responses are reflected at organismal level, (ii) tannery waste leachates cause adverse effects on the expression of genes encoding seminal proteins that facilitate normal reproduction and (iii) Hsp70 may be used as a marker of cellular damage for reproductive organs.

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Available from: Hifzur Siddique
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    • "In spite of the absence of developmental effects, alterations in the expression of Hsp genes is demonstrated what would indicate some type of physiological effect. Changes in Hsp genes expression in D. melanogaster (mainly Hsp70) have been demonstrated to be very sensitive markers to any form of biological stress and have been proposed as useful indicators of adverse biological impact (Mukhopadhyay et al., 2003; Siddique et al., 2009). It must be remembered that they are well conserved through evolution and that they are induced by a wide range of inducers, including metals. "
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    ABSTRACT: Although in vitro approaches are the most used for testing the potential harmful effects of nanomaterials, in vivo studies produce relevant information complementing in vitro data. In this context, we promote the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a suitable in vivo model to characterise the potential risks associated to nanomaterials exposure. The main aim of this study was to evaluate different biological effects associated to cerium oxide nanoparticles (Ce-NPs) and cerium (IV) sulphate exposure. The end-points evaluated were egg-to-adult viability, particles uptake through the intestinal barrier, gene expression and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by haemocytes, genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity. Transmission electron microscopy images showed internalisation of Ce-NPs by the intestinal barrier and haemocytes, and significant expression of Hsp genes was detected. In spite of these findings, neither toxicity nor genotoxicity related to both forms of cerium were observed. Interestingly, Ce-NPs significantly reduced the genotoxic effect of potassium dichromate and the intracellular ROS production. No morphological malformations were detected after larvae treatment. This study highlights the importance of D. melanogaster as animal model in the study of the different biological effects caused by nanoparticulated materials, at the time that shows its usefulness to study the role of the intestinal barrier in the transposition of nanomaterials entering via ingestion.
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    • "In spite of the absence of developmental effects, alterations in the expression of Hsp genes is demonstrated what would indicate some type of physiological effect. Changes in Hsp genes expression in D. melanogaster (mainly Hsp70) have been demonstrated to be very sensitive markers to any form of biological stress and have been proposed as useful indicators of adverse biological impact (Mukhopadhyay et al., 2003; Siddique et al., 2009). It must be remembered that they are well conserved through evolution and that they are induced by a wide range of inducers, including metals. "

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    • "It also has a potential impact on the development and metabolism of phloem-feeding insects [2]. The expression of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 can act as a marker of cellular damage sustained by insects in polluted habitats and by exposure to Zinc (Zn) during diapause [19], [20], [29]. Tributyltin (TBT) and cadmium (Cd) tested on the freshwater arthropod Chironomus riparius (Diptera), resulted in inhibition of oviposition [30]. "
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