Changes in dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in salivary glands of female lone star ticks, Amblyomma americanum (L.), during feeding

ArticleinInsect Biochemistry 14(5):595-600 · December 1984
DOI: 10.1016/0020-1790(84)90016-7

    Abstract

    The activity of dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in feeding female ixodid tick salivary glands was dependent on the state of tick feeding. Activity was significantly greater than the “basal” activity in salivary glands from ticks at all stages of tick feeding. Enzyme activity was not detected in the glands of unfed females. Enzyme activity reached a peak in glands of ticks weighing approx. 200 mg then declined as ticks increased in weight beyond 200 mg to repletion. Replete ticks (detached from the host for 12–24 hr) had similar levels of basal and dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity as that measured in salivary glands of high weight (>200 mg) ticks. Enzyme activity was 19–62% less in glands from ticks feeding on hosts that had been parasitized 2–4 months earlier by lone star ticks.