Article

Heterogeneous Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenols in Wastewater: A Review on Current Status and Developments

Department of Ecological Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Japan
Desalination (Impact Factor: 3.76). 10/2010; 261(1-2):3-18. DOI: 10.1016/j.desal.2010.04.062

ABSTRACT

In recent years, there has been an enormous amount of research and development in the area of heterogeneous photocatalytic water purification process due to its effectiveness in degrading and mineralising the recalcitrant organic compounds as well as the possibility of utilising the solar UV and visible spectrum. One hundred and twenty recently published papers are reviewed and summarised here with the focus being on the photocatalytic oxidation of phenols and their derivatives, predominant in waste water effluent. In this review, the effects of various operating parameters on the photocatalytic degradation of phenols and substituted phenols are presented. Recent findings suggested that different parameters, such as type of photocatalyst and composition, light intensity, initial substrate concentration, amount of catalyst, pH of the reaction medium, ionic components in water, solvent types, oxidising agents/electron acceptors, mode of catalyst application, and calcination temperatures can play an important role on the photocatalytic degradation of phenolic compounds in wastewater. Extensive research has focused on the enhancement of photocatalysis by modification of TiO2 employing metal, non-metal and ion doping. Recent developments in TiO2 photocatalysis for the degradation of various phenols and substituted phenols are also reviewed.

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