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Perceived Leader Integrity Scale: An instrument for assessing employee perceptions of leader integrity

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Abstract

Little empirical research has investigated the role of leaders' ethical integrity in their effectiveness. This may be due, in part, to the unavailability of sound measurement instruments designed for use in this area. The present research provided a partial remedy for this problem by developing and initially validating a new instrument, called the Perceived Leader Integrity Scale (PLIS). In both a student sample and an organizational field sample, the PLIS demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha > .97) and expected patterns of correlation with other variables. In the organizational sample, factor analysis indicated a unidimensional factor structure. Analyses based on item response theory (IRT) indicated that the PLIS generates estimates of respondents' standing on the perceived leader integrity construct (θ) with standard errors as low as .08. Implications for further study of perceived leader integrity were discussed.
... The following elements necessitate a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the leadership integrity literature. First, a considerable theoretical and empirical split has existed in J o u r n a l P r e -p r o o f the field of leadership integrity research since Craig and Gustafson (1998) introduced the idea of leadership integrity in their seminal work. Second, although being published in prestigious publications, leadership integrity literature lacks conceptual coherence. ...
... Since the inception of the term "integrity" was first in the business literature, the term bore a multitude of meanings with a tug of war still remains either to pull the term to the purely normative moral concept (Brown, Treviño, & Harrison, 2005;Craig & Gustafson, 1998;Enwereuzor, Onyishi, Albi-Oparaocha, & Amaeshi, 2020) or an independent concept of just objective view of "word deeds alignment" Palanski & Yammarino, 2009;Simons, 2002). The basis of the brawl is due to a lack of theory and frequent definitions (Palanski & Yammarino, 2007). ...
... From the review of existing scales to measure integrity, we recommend three scales to fulfill the rigorous criteria of scale development and validation, namely PLIS by Craig and Gustafson (1998), BI scale by Simons, Friedman, Liu, and McLean Parks (2007), and multidimensional leadership integrity scales by Moorman et al. (2013). All the scales meet the minimum criteria of scale development by Hinkin (1998). ...
Article
Both academics and industry experts prioritize integrity as the most important leadership quality. The attention placed on integrity is evident by the fact that 71 research papers have only been published in ISI/Scopus-indexed journals over the last five years. Given the importance of the topic, this study conducted a thorough evaluation of 129 research papers on leadership integrity published in 70 prestigious journals between 1998 and 2020 using the SPAR-4-SLR framework developed by Paul, Lim, O’Cass, Hao, and Bresciani (2021). The review examines the body of literature on leadership integrity, ranging from conceptual clarity to recent debate, and compares the theories advocated by different leadership academics. We also thoroughly examined each scale used (for example, ten measures) by leadership researchers in order to determine the best scales. The current review also offers recommendations for future leadership research and frames the nomological network of leadership integrity in relation to its correlates (i.e., antecedents, mediators, moderators, and multiple-level outcomes).
... For example, Hoobler and Hu (2013), Michel, Newness, and Duniewicz (2016), and Rice and Young (2021) found abusive supervision, a specific type of unethical behavior (Brown & Mitchell, 2010), positively impacts employee work-related negative affectivity, and several studies have demonstrated a negative effect of abusive supervision on emotional exhaustion (Han, Harms, & Bai, 2017;Wu & Hu, 2009) and health (Lin, Wang, & Chen, 2013). Although unethical behavior includes mistreating employees interpersonally, as with abusive supervision (Tepper, 2000), it also includes sabotage, stealing ideas from employees, fraud, kickbacks, and many other behaviors that undermine the goals of the organization and harms others (Craig & Gustafson, 1998). Findings from recent studies have shown that employees distrust leaders who are unethical and retaliate against these leaders for their unethical behavior (Dang et al., 2017;Fehr et al., 2020). ...
... For example, these leaders engage in falsification, blackmail, and communication distortion when addressing their employees (Greenbaum, Mawritz, Bonner, Webster, & Kim, 2018). They deliberately withhold developmental opportunities from their employees (McCann & Holt, 2013) and belittle and sabotage employees, signaling the leaders' desire for employees to fail (Craig & Gustafson, 1998). These behaviors are also viewed as divisive and illegitimate, which produces conflict among organization members (Craig & Gustafson, 1998;Ferris & Kacmar, 1992). ...
... They deliberately withhold developmental opportunities from their employees (McCann & Holt, 2013) and belittle and sabotage employees, signaling the leaders' desire for employees to fail (Craig & Gustafson, 1998). These behaviors are also viewed as divisive and illegitimate, which produces conflict among organization members (Craig & Gustafson, 1998;Ferris & Kacmar, 1992). Because their behavior does not align with social norms (Gino, Ayal, & Ariely, 2009), unethical leaders are often viewed as unpredictable and harmful (Cialdini & Trost, 1998). ...
Article
We explore how the impacts of unethical leadership are influenced either beneficially or detrimentally by perceived organizational support. A stress–resource view suggests organizational support is a resource that should offset the negative implications of unethical leadership. The negative exacerbator view suggests that receiving organizational support in light of unethical leadership should heighten the threat because it draws a stronger focus on and salience to the harm of the leader’s behavior for the employee. The results of a time-separated survey study and an experiment support our model and the negative exacerbator view. The findings show that unethical leader behavior elicits negative affect and indirectly (through negative affect) diminishes employees’ well-being and has a stronger effect when perceived organizational support was higher rather than lower.
... Instrumen mestilah mempunyai kebolehpercayaan yang tinggi bagi mendapatkan hasil kajian yang baik (Sekaran & Bougie 2016). Namun demikian, instrumeninstrumen nilai dan etika yang dibangunkan di luar negara kebanyakannya dianalisis kesahan dan kebolehpercayaan menggunakan analisis penelitian multidimensi seperti analisis faktor (Craig & Gustafson 1998;Kalshoven et al. 2011;Yukl et al. 2011). Instrumen yang dihasilkan tidak mengaplikasikan model pengukuran Rasch dalam pembinaannya. ...
... Instrumen yang dihasilkan tidak mengaplikasikan model pengukuran Rasch dalam pembinaannya. Instrumen yang sedia ada juga menilai dimensi-dimensi tertentu seperti dimensi kepimpinan etika (Brown et al. 2005;Engelbrecht & Heine 2012;Kalshoven et al. 2011;Spangenberg & Theron 2005;Yukl et al. 2011) dan aspek integriti (Craig & Gustafson 1998;Simons et al. 2007). Analisis yang digunakan untuk kesahan dan kebolehpercayaan instrumen ialah analisis faktor dan keseragaman dalaman melalui cronbach alpha. ...
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Kajian ini menghuraikan kaedah-kaedah utama pendidikan anak-anak menurut Abdullah Nasih Ulwan dalam membentuk jati diri. Kajian ini dilakukan untuk mengkaji apakah kaedah yang terbaik bagi membantu untuk membentuk jati diri anak memandangkan kes jenayah dan gejala sosial hari ini seringkali melibatkan anak-anak yang masih muda terutama dalam kalangan remaja muslim. Kajian ini akan menggunakan karya Abdullah Nasih Ulwan, mengenai pendidikan anak-anak dalam islam, kaedah-kaedah pendidikan dan pengaplikasianya. Dalam menghasilkan kajian ini, pengkaji menggunakan pendekatan kualitatif iaitu kaedah perpustakaan untuk mencari maklumat dan bahan kajian. Kesimpulannya, kaedah-kaedah pendidikan anak dan pengaplikasiannya perlu diamalkan dan diaplikasi oleh semua pihak kerana ia sesuatu yang bukan sahaja bertitik tolak dari ajaran al-Quran malah diperkemaskan dengan keadaan realiti hari ini.
... There is conceptual disagreement regarding how to de ine and quantify ethical leadership. Our research aimed to determine the most important ethical leadership skills Perceived leader integrity scale Craig and Gustafson (1998) created the PLIS after reviewing leadership literature. The items represent how followers see their leader's ethical behavior. ...
... The first part of the questionnaire covered biographic variables that covered sex, age, marital status, designation, and highest level of education The second section covered both the independent variables (perceived leader integrity, perceived organizational justice, and perceived organizational support) and the dependent variable (attitude towards corrupt practices). Perceived leader integrity was measured with 10 items adopted from Craig and Gustafson's (1998) perceived leader integrity scale. Example of items on the scale is "my boss would allow me to be blamed for his/her mistakes". ...
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In the developing countries, corruption in public sector organizations is widely implicated in low economic development and ravaging poverty. This study ascertains whether work experience, in terms of leader integrity, organizational justice and organizational support influence attitude towards corrupt practices among public sector employees. Design of this study is cross-sectional and data were collected with four standardized scales that were presented in questionnaire form. Two hundred and four public sector employees were drawn from public sector organizations in Asaba, Delta State, Nigeria. The participants comprised 75 males, 129 females,.159 married and 40 unmarried. Their age mean was 40 years (SD, 8.67). Data analyses revealed that perceived leader integrity, r (202) =-.21, p < .002.), perceived organizational justice, r (202) =-.25, p < .001) and perceived organizational support, r (202) =-.16, p < .001) have significant negatively relationship with attitude towards corrupt practices among public sector employees. It was concluded that certain work experience influence employees in their attitude towards corrupt practices. Therefore, leadership in public sector organizations should in behaviour and in policies provide positive work experience that would induce desirable outcomes from employees. Future studies should adopt triangulation approach in data collection to control for social desirability bias and common method variance.
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Bu çalışma kapsayıcı liderliğin değişime odaklı örgütsel vatandaşlık davranışına etkisinin yanında psikolojik güvenliğin aracı, liderin davranışsal tutarlılığının düzenleyici rolünü araştırmaktadır. 290 çalışandan oluşan bir örneklem kullanılarak, kapsayıcı liderlik, değişime odaklı örgütsel vatandaşlık davranışı, psikolojik güvenlik ve liderin davranışsal tutarlılığı değişkenleri arasındaki ilişkiler araştırılmıştır. Yapısal eşitlik metodu (YEM) bulguları kapsayıcı liderliğin değişim odaklı vatandaşlık davranış ve psikolojik güvenlik üzerinde pozitif bir etkisi olduğunu göstermektedir. Psikolojik güvenliğin ise değişim odaklı vatandaşlık davranışı üzerinde pozitif etkisi olduğu tespit edilmiştir. SPSS Process 4 ve 5 makroları ile de Psikolojik güvenliğin aracılık etkisi ve lider davranış tutarlılığının düzenleyici rolleri doğrulanmıştır.
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Ronald K. Hambleton; H. Swaminathan; H. Jane Rogers., The following values have no corresponding Zotero field: Label: B496 ID - 337
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