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Abstract

This article provides the first large scale investigation of the ability of a loyalty programs to alter the normal market patterns of repeat-purchase behaviour. A large loyalty program is evaluated in terms of its ability to generate ‘excess loyalty’ for brands in the program. Panel data were used to develop Dirichlet estimates of expected repeat-purchase loyalty statistics by brand, thus controlling for self-selection effects. The loyalty estimates were compared with the observed market repeat-purchase behaviour. Overall a trend towards a weak level of excess loyalty was observed, although the expected deviation was not consistently observed for all the loyalty program brands. Only two of the six loyalty program participant brands showed excess loyalty. However, these deviations in repeat-purchase loyalty were observed for non-members of the loyalty program as well as members and appear likely to be at least partially the result of other loyalty efforts particular to these brands.
... Customers, who show loyalty attitudes are more likely to purchase on a regular basis, decrease marketing expenses and expenditure, exhibit a lesser sensitivity toward changes of price, and spread more positive WOM and eWOM (Abubakar & Mavondo, 2014;Wardi et al., 2018). This can be beneficial and profitable for organizations (Sharp & Sharp, 1997). This research looks into concepts of satisfaction and loyalty of customers through switching barriers in food festival format, which are explained in the following section. ...
... Loyalty programs enable hotels to retain customers, reflected by their low switching intention to non-program brands and high purchase frequency (Sharp and Sharp 1997). Loyalty members show higher value and affective commitments toward the brand than non-members, and their membership affects price sensitivity (Tanford et al. 2011). ...
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To attract a transient market, hotels primarily use several distribution channels, such as the following: the hotel directly, central reservation offices, travel agents, and online booking systems. Yet, little attention has been paid to the revenue management implications with regard to the focus on distribution channels. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of channels and prices on brand dimensions and to study the role of hotel loyalty membership in the relationships. A 2 (channel) × 2 (price) × 2 (loyalty membership) quasi-experiment was designed to test the research objectives. Multivariate Analysis of Variance was used to test significant differences. The findings provide implications for the industry.
... A maioria dos estudos produzidos evidencia a evolução da procura não só rumo a ambientes saudáveis como relata a saturação dos turistas por oferta massificada, reconhecendo-se o turismo natureza como ferramenta para a diversificação da economia rural (Sharp e Sharp, 1997 de Portugal, 2006) Desta forma converte-se um território num espaço turístico, fruto da presença e distribuição geográfica de diferentes atrativos (Boullón, 1990). ...
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Surgimento do turismo nos espaços rurais como consequência de mudanças mais amplas da sociedade, com destaque para novos usos e percepções sobre estes espaços. Contextualiza-se a evolução desta modalidade de turismo na Microrregião Turística Uva e Vinho da Serra Gaúcha, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil; bem como são apresentados dados que comprovam o crescimento do fluxo turístico de seus roteiros mais consolidados. Descrevem-se processos relacionados à introdução do turismo nos espaços rurais e ocorrências associadas que justificam a criação de mecanismos de gestão territorial, exemplificados por instrumentos implantados nos municípios de Bento Gonçalves, Carlos Barbosa e Caxias do Sul. Por fim, propõe a reflexão sobre os impactos decorrentes do crescimento acelerado do turismo nos espaços rurais, justificando a gestão territorial.
... The challenge for managers is getting a sense of which CEBs should be fostered first in order to spark increased engagement or develop it among those not currently engaged. While the temptation has been to shortcut the process by implementing loyalty programs, these are often expensive and of limited value in changing behavior (Sharp & Sharp, 1997). Increased patronage is not the only outcome sought from engagement, rather it is the customers' personal networks, their ability to build trust and influence others on the firms behalf, their knowledge about the brand, and their creativity to drive new product insights (Harmeling et al., 2017). ...
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Customer engagement (CE) is an emerging perspective that provides a holistic view of the ways in which customers’ interactive experiences with organizations create value for both the parties. Central to this, is the need to develop an understanding of why a customer would choose to invest their resources (cognitive, emotional, and behavioral) with an organization, to be able to better facilitate this engagement and properly value the outcomes from it. Sport, with its inherently strong interactions for both participants and fans, would seem an ideal setting to study CE. To date, however, the CE work in sport domains has largely followed established paths. Given CE’s potential to unify many disparate areas of sport research, this paper presents a comprehensive review of the CE work to date and highlights several ways sport can leverage and advance this work through both academic research and management practice.
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No industry is immune to digital transformation. Social media is empowering individuals everywhere and driving a democratization of personal access that is fundamentally different from the top-down communications associated with traditional mass-media at the outset of globalization. Social media, social sharing, and social business have been accelerated by COVID-19. The rise of e-commerce has materially affected not only how people buy, but also how people research their purchase decisions. Marketing has not kept up with this paradigm shift, and by simply viewing digital as another media channel misses the shift in consumer power and the imperative to engage rather than advertise. Narratives are part of our everyday, and popular stories affect individual and community behaviour. We demonstrate how big data and AI can track the narratives that are shaping our world. Engaging with these narratives can improve marketing decision-making by addressing what people feel is important and result in better outcomes to grow and sustain brand equity in our contemporary, digital world.
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Purpose Extant literature on business-to-business (B2B) has largely ignored studying multi-homing through a psychological lens. This paper aims to outline the results of three constituent studies, which were designed to reveal potential differences in multi-homers’ versus single-homers’ loyalty behaviors in a B2B and supply chain management (SCM) setting; identify factors that differentiate single-homers and multi-homers in these settings; and examine the relevance and effect of perceived risk on multi-homing behaviors. Design/methodology/approach In Studies 1 and 2, the authors used a questionnaire-based survey to capture the perceptions of 503 and 458 SCM experts, respectively. They then deployed AMOS v.21 to perform structural equation modeling. In Study 3, the authors used a mixed-methods approach to interview 18 SCM experts and then applied these insights to a survey with 242 SCM experts. Findings Study 1 reveals that multi-homers’ loyalty toward their preferred SP has a weaker effect on willingness to pay premium prices and share-of-wallet than single-homers’ loyalty. Study 2 establishes that several attitudinal factors distinguish multi-homers from single-homers in a loyalty framework. Study 3 concludes that perceived risk dimensions promote multi-homing intention, which in turn promotes multi-homing behavior. Originality/value Through empirical investigation, the present research succeeds in establishing that multi-homing is a concern for SPs, deciphering the attitudinal factors that distinguish multi-homers and single-homers in a loyalty framework, and confirming the influence of perceived risk dimensions on multi-homing. Thus, the study has several theoretical and practical implications for B2B services in emerging economies.
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