Causes of death in duodenal and gastric ulcer

ArticleinGastroenterology 73(5):1000-4 · December 1977with12 Reads
Source: PubMed
Abstract
An analysis has been made of 235 deaths that occurred among 1905 patients with peptic ulcer who constituted a random sample of the occurrence of ulcer disease in an area of Denmark comprising half a million inhabitants. The disease itself, according to the death certificate, was considered the primary cause of death in 10% of the cases; half of these had been operated on immediately before death. The other patients died more frequently than expected from the following causes: chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, cancer of the lung, cirrhosis of the liver, and cancer of the pancreas. Although the comorbidity with chronic bronchitis and emphysema was especially pronounced in patients with gastric ulcer, the association with liver cirrhosis and cancer of the pancreas occurred only in patients with duodenal ulcer. In women the mortality rate attributable to cardiac and vascular diseases was lower than expected. No excess coincidence of suicide was found. Berkson's fallacy is considered to be of much less importance as a possible explanation of the comorbidity found in the present study than in the majority of publications concerned with this question.
    • "Three epidemiological studies published between 1968 and 1986 revealed that the COPD prevalence in peptic ulcer (PU) patients is 2 to 3 times greater compared with controls without PU141516. Additionally, a wide population study revealed that chronic bronchitis is a significant cause of death in PU patients [17]. Smoking was considered to be a significant factor underlying the relationship between these conditions. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We aimed to investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using the C-14 urea-breath test (C14UBT) and to determine whether there is an association between H. pylori infection and the severity of COPD. This is the first report in the literature of the use of C14UBT to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori in patients with COPD. Fifty subjects with COPD (38 males and 12 females, aged 61±10 years) and 20 control subjects (10 males and 10 females, aged 55±11 years) were evaluated. C14UBT was used to determine H. pylori infection. The prevalences of H. pylori infection in subjects with COPD and in controls were 72% and 65%, respectively (p=0.56). Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) values were significantly higher in the H. pylori-infected subjects with COPD than in the uninfected subjects (p=0.008 and p=0.006, respectively). The presence of H. pylori infection in COPD patients affects pulmonary functions, but the effects of H. pylori infection on the respiratory system and COPD are not clear.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2012
    • "Unfortunately, there are no studies in the literature focused on the potential aetio-pathogenetic role of H. pylori infection in chronic bronchitis. Some authors hypothesized that the chronic activation of inflammatory mediators induced by H. pylori infection might lead to the development of a non-specific inflammatory process, such as chronic bronchitis [19,21] . It is well known that H. pylori and particularly those strains bearing the cytotoxin associated gene-A (cagA positive strains), stimulates the release of a variety of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha [25,26] . "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: In the past few years, a variety of extradigestive disorders, including cardiovascular, skin, rheumatic and liver diseases, have been associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The activation of inflammatory mediators by H. pylori seems to be the pathogenetic mechanism underlying the observed associations. The present review summarizes the current literature, including our own studies, concerning the association between H. pylori infection and respiratory diseases. A small number of epidemiological and serologic, case-control studies suggest that H. pylori infection may be associated with the development of chronic bronchitis. A frequent coexistence of pulmonary tuberculosis and H. pylori infection has also been found. Moreover, recent studies have shown an increased H. pylori seroprevalence in patients with bronchiectasis and in those with lung cancer. On the other hand, bronchial asthma seems not to be related with H. pylori infection. All associations between H. pylori infection and respiratory diseases are primarily based on case-control studies, concerning relatively small numbers of patients. Moreover, there is a lack of studies focused on the pathogenetic link between respiratory diseases and H. pylori infection. Therefore, we believe that larger studies should be undertaken to confirm the observed results and to clarify the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms.
    Article · Feb 2003
    • "Unfortunately, there are no studies in the literature focused on the potential aetio-pathogenetic role of H. pylori infection in chronic bronchitis. Some authors hypothesized that the chronic activation of inflammatory mediators induced by H. pylori infection might lead to the development of a non-specific inflammatory process, such as chronic bronchitis [19,21] . It is well known that H. pylori and particularly those strains bearing the cytotoxin associated gene-A (cagA positive strains), stimulates the release of a variety of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha [25,26] . "
    Article · Jan 2003
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