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COLLABORATIVE EVALUATION RESEARCH: A CASE STUDY OF TEACHERS’ AND ACADEMIC RESEARCHERS’ TEAMWORK IN A SECONDARY SCHOOL

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Abstract

The article examines the processes and challenges involved in conducting participatory research and evaluation in schools, by looking at a case study of a collaborative evaluation research that was conducted in a secondary school in Israel by two researchers and three teachers. It describes the experiences of the research team while conducting the study, the processes that developed during this collaboration, and the kinds of knowledge that emerged over the two years of teamwork. It also describes the features of the relationships between the various individuals who participated in the study. Implications for evaluation in schools are presented.

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... Expanding is an opportunity for administrators to "take the big step" (Hollenbeck & Hall, 2004:261) in exploring a vast range of possibilities by seeing unrecognized previous potentialities (Fox, 1989;cited in Cardon, Zietsm, Saparito, Matherne, & Davis, 2005). It is an effect of their collaboration, which developed among individuals directly and/or indirectly involved in the activities (Alpert & Bechar, 2007). Passionate administrators expect the fruits of their labor to be born from their working together with their faculty. ...
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... According to Alpert and Bechar (2007), both practitioners and educational specialists involved in collaborative research should be able to benefit from the research engagement. CTL members as educational specialists benefited from their partnerships with lecturers. ...
... According to Alpert and Bechar (2007), both practitioners and educational specialists involved in collaborative research should be able to benefit from the research engagement. CTL members as educational specialists benefited from their partnerships with lecturers. ...
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I am pleased to have this opportunity to talk about some recent developments in the methodology of program evaluation and about what I call responsive evaluation.
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Introduction - William Foote Whyte PAR IN INDUSTRY Participatory Action Research - William Foote Whyte, Davydd J Greenwood and Peter Lazes Through Practice to Science in Social Research Participatory Action Research - Larry A Pace and Dominick R Argona A View from Xerox Participatory Action Research - Anthony J Constanza A View from ACTWU Participatory Action Research - Jose Luis Gonzalez Santos A View from FAGOR Participatory Action Research and Action Science Compared - Chris Argyris and Donald Schon A Commentary Comparing PAR and Action Science - William Foote Whyte Research, Action and Participation - Richard E Walton and Michael Gaffney The Merchant Shipping Case Co-Generative Learning - Max Elden and Morton Levin Bringing Participation into Action Research Action Research as Method - Jan Irgen Karlsen Reflections from a Program for Developing Methods and Competence Participant Observer Research - Robert E Cole An Activist Role PAR IN AGRICULTURE Participatory Strategies in Agricultural Research and Development - William Foote Whyte A Joint Venture in Technology Transfer to Increase Adoption Rates - Ramiro Ortiz Participatory Action Research in Togo - Richard Maclure and Michael Bassey An Inquiry into Maize Storage Systems The Role of the Social Scientist in Participatory Action research - Sergio Ruano Social Scientists in International Agriculture Resarch - Douglas E Horton Ensuring Relevance and Conributing to the Knowledge Base Conclusions - William Foote Whyte