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The ‘real thing’: Branding authenticity in the luxury wine trade

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Abstract

Authenticity is a cornerstone of contemporary marketing practice yet confusion surrounds the nature and use of authenticity in the brand arena. We identify six attributions of authenticity based on an examination of the strategies of 20 ultra-premium wineries and interviews with 30 wine consumers. These six attributes are: heritage and pedigree, stylistic consistency, quality commitments, relationship to place, method of production, and downplaying commercial motives. These attributes of authenticity resonated with consumers. The attributes of authenticity were both real and stylized versions of the truth.

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... Thomsen et al. (2020) refer to epistemological scarcity as "the rareness of the luxury encounter" (p.443) and wherein luxury experiences are hindered or realised based on one's perceptual (in)ability or mindfulness towards them. The perceived rareness of luxury consumption can evoke feelings of specialness, exclusivity (Phau & Prendergast, 2000) or authenticity (Beverland, 2006) for some, however, this is not the case for all. Unconventional luxury reflects Wiedmann & Hennigs' (2012) reference to an experiential luxury sensibility based on how consumers define luxury. ...
... This reflection is evident in the participants' interviews. Space presents the opportunity to "transcend the saturation of the effects on our senses as well as the tyranny of symbolism [that has] imprisoned objects in a register that tends to empty them of their meaning and emotionality" through a process of appreciation and rediscovery of oneself and of the natural beauty (Heilbrunn, 2007 Originality also materialises in the aesthetic qualities and a felt authenticity -both of which are recognised dimensions of luxury (e.g., Beverland, 2006;Kapferer & Florence, 2016). ...
... Aaker et al. (2011) discuss the interlinkage between personal meaning and social connection as central to one's wellbeing. However, for such 'giving' experiences to be represented as a luxury, a genuine passion from the host grounded in a sense of place is necessary for an experience to be considered sincere (Beverland, 2006). It must present an accurate depiction of the host's lives and culture (Prince & Ioannides, 2017) and requires a host who wants to interact and share the reality of their lives with tourists, who offer "'sincere social interaction' and 'sincere emotional response'" (Taheri, Gannon, Cordina & Lochrie, 2018, p.2752 which, in Charlotte's case, underpin her sense of mattering as evidence in her perception of an exclusive and special experience. ...
Article
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This study addresses the transformational role time and substance play in an unconventional luxury experience. Adopting a giving, as opposed to having, perspective of unconventional luxury, in-depth interviews were carried out with tourists in a luxury Ecocamp in Kenya. We demonstrate how the reappropriation of time is central to the transformational effects of unconventional luxury experiences. Time and substance are interlinked whereby an emphasis on substance promotes a reconsideration of time and vice versa. Time is reappropriated through a process of appreciation, learning and (re)discovery resulting in inner (self), outward (self in relation to others) and onward (non-related distant others) transformations. We present the bidirectional relationship of giving experiences and a blending of inner and outward transformations resulting in an unintended 'matcher' experience. We reposition unconventional luxury as grounded in ethicality and its associated positive impacts on one's wellbeing, reflecting higher levels of personal meaning and relevance in the consumption experience.
... Besides these, Brown et al. (2003) noted the importance of a heartfelt story in generating the authenticity of luxury wines for marketing Demystifying the authenticity experience and outlined a range of factors for achieving sincerity, including enthusiasm for wine production, rational production methods and the use of modern marketing techniques. Beverland (2006) also searched the authenticity perception of ultra-premium wineries and identified six attributions of authenticity, namely, heritage and pedigree, stylistic consistency, quality commitments, relationship to place, method of production and downplaying commercial motives. Accordingly, Gundlach and Neville (2012) criticized Beverland's findings and conceptualized authenticity attributes based on beer within five driving attributes: esthetics, commitments to consistency and quality, relation to place, heritage/pedigree and exclusivity. ...
... Likewise, the taste of terroir has also been primarily used by marketers as a lure of authenticity (Lewis and Bridger, 2001). Moreover, our taste in terroir theme is strictly related to the "relationship to place" highlighted by prior studies (Brown et al., 2003;Beverland, 2006;Gundlach and Neville, 2012). However, to the best of our knowledge, the oenological knowledge has not been ascertained in prior studies, as these dimensions emerged with the nature of wine tourism activities. ...
... It can be somehow relevant because of the nature of the meal-sharing economy experience, which provides access to factual information from the primary source (Atsız et al., 2022a(Atsız et al., , 2022b. Prior studies have highlighted various issues that are closely related to oenology, such as the method of production (Beverland, 2006), rational production methods (Brown et al., 2003), heritage and pedigree (Gundlach and Neville, 2012); however, it failed to address the wine oenology as a whole. Thus, identifying this theme can be of great importance for scholars searching for the fountain of the authenticity experience. ...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this study is to demystify the authenticity dimensions of wine experience with the locally guided tour in the meal-sharing economy, drawing on travellers' online reviews at Withlocals for French locally guided wine tours. Design/methodology/approach The qualitative research approach was performed through the thematic analysis of 940 online reviews from Withlocals. The coding phase was completed based on a three-step coding process (i.e. open, axial and selective coding), as all reviews that were gathered were related to locally guided wine tours rather than only wine-sharing activities. Findings The findings of this study demonstrated four interrelated authenticity dimensions: the taste of terroir, local atmosphere, oenological knowledge and local insight. The results of this study also notably showed that all reviews were primarily positive; travellers expressed their satisfaction with wine tours at Withlocals and often mentioned their re-purchase intentions as well as advising wine tours in the meal-sharing economy. Practical implications Several worthy theoretical and practical implications were discussed for local tour guides to improve their tour quality more authentically. The results also demonstrate that locally guided wine tours in the meal-sharing economy were regarded as a multidimensional activity that provides a better discovery of a wine destination. Originality/value Despite the large volume of generic meal-sharing economy experience studies, the authenticity experience of the locally guided wine tours has been surprisingly omitted by scholars. Therefore, this study contributes to the sharing economy literature through wine experience by addressing the authenticity dimensions of the locally guided wine tours in the meal-sharing economy.
... In social media analysis, researchers often hear that users prefer, trust, or relate to content because it is "authentic", but the user often cannot clarify what makes content "authentic". The concept of authenticity has been synonymous with several other ideas including: truthful (Becker et al. 2019;Beverland and Farrelly 2010), genuine (Becker et al. 2019;Beverland 2006), relatable, factual (Beverland and Farrelly 2010), real (Beverland and Farrelly 2010;Grayson and Martinec 2004;Stern 1994), intrinsically motived (Audrezet et al. 2020;Holt 2002), transparent (Moulard et al. 2021), credible (Nunes et al. 2021;Shomoossi and Saeed 2007;Stern 1994), and multidimensional (Beverland 2006;Joo et al. 2019;Nunes et al. 2021). Nunes et al. (2021) believe that the concept of authenticity is "a formative rather than a reflective construct" because consumers' evaluations are a result of the judgement of multiple, non-interchangeable constructs that combine to form an overall perception of authenticity rather than simply basing the estimation on a single judgement of a stand-alone concept (p. ...
... In social media analysis, researchers often hear that users prefer, trust, or relate to content because it is "authentic", but the user often cannot clarify what makes content "authentic". The concept of authenticity has been synonymous with several other ideas including: truthful (Becker et al. 2019;Beverland and Farrelly 2010), genuine (Becker et al. 2019;Beverland 2006), relatable, factual (Beverland and Farrelly 2010), real (Beverland and Farrelly 2010;Grayson and Martinec 2004;Stern 1994), intrinsically motived (Audrezet et al. 2020;Holt 2002), transparent (Moulard et al. 2021), credible (Nunes et al. 2021;Shomoossi and Saeed 2007;Stern 1994), and multidimensional (Beverland 2006;Joo et al. 2019;Nunes et al. 2021). Nunes et al. (2021) believe that the concept of authenticity is "a formative rather than a reflective construct" because consumers' evaluations are a result of the judgement of multiple, non-interchangeable constructs that combine to form an overall perception of authenticity rather than simply basing the estimation on a single judgement of a stand-alone concept (p. ...
Article
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Purpose Authenticity is a trait that is considered by both Gen Z and Millennials as an integral part of the social media influencer persuasive episode. This research uses thematic analysis to deconstruct how both Gen Z and Millennials develop their perceptions of social media influencer authenticity. Design/methodology This study conducted four focus groups with a total of 15 members of Gen Z and 13 members of Millennials. Participants were screened to ensure they followed lifestyle social media influencers and have made purchases based on influencer recommendations. The online focus groups discussed how participants from each generation evaluate the authenticity of Social Media Influencers (SMIs) using a six-factor cumulative model (Nunes, Joseph C., Andrea Ordanini & Gaia Giambastiani. 2021. The concept of authenticity: What it means to consumers. Journal of Marketing 85(4). 1–20). Findings The research findings show that Gen Z considers SMIs to be highly educated friends with whom they can seek advice and opinions, while Millennials see social media influencer as a profession that needs to be done in an ethical and transparent manner. Practical implications These findings are useful in understanding the psychology between both Gen Z and Millennials so appropriate producer messaging can be used to reach them. Originality/value As the concept of authenticity has been defined differently by multiple entities, this research seeks to fill the current research gap in the literature analyzing generational definitions of perceived authenticity, specifically between the two largest online consumer cohorts, Gen Z and Millennials.
... CSR authenticity not only means the consumer's actual trust in CSR activities [34] but is also an important factor influencing the evaluation of CSR activities [35,36]. In particular, authenticity is a critical factor for stakeholders in evaluating CSR activities [35]. ...
... When consumers feel a sense of authenticity regarding a company's CSR activities, distrust in the company is reduced. Authenticity can be viewed as trust in an actual object [34], and this trust induces "trust transfer" in consumers to make a qualitative evaluation of the product [40]. Therefore, actions without authenticity are less likely to elicit positive responses than actions with authenticity, even if the action itself is not criticized [41]. ...
Article
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This study examines the effect of consumers’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on their anti-consumer awareness. Specifically, this study aims to uncover the mechanisms through which the consumer’s CSR perception relates to their formation of anti-consumer awareness. A survey design was adopted to test this study’s hypotheses. We collected data from 310 consumers in South Korea and used path analysis and bootstrapping to test the hypotheses. Our results showed that consumers’ CSR perception is negatively related to their anti-consumer awareness. Notably, consumers’ perception of CSR activities is positively related to their perceptions of compassion toward organizations, which, in turn, is also positively associated with their perception of CSR authenticity. Furthermore, compassion and CSR authenticity serially mediate the negative relationship between CSR perception and anti-consumer awareness. Our findings shed light on the importance of engaging in CSR activities from consumers’ perspectives. Specifically, our findings suggest that organizations need to proactively engage in CSR activities with authenticity to maintain and even further their reputation among consumers. Furthermore, by demonstrating the psychological processes of how CSR activities translate into consumers’ attitudes toward the organizations, our study provides fruitful avenues for future research.
... In total, 42 wineries (33.6%) indicate their family nature by including "family" in the winery name, though this was not always carried over in the website address. Some highlight their family connectedness through their name (Beverland, 2006), the brand story , and the "people" pages on the site. The "people" page includes a discussion of the contribution of a range of individuals, including employees ...
... Sixty-seven wineries (53.6%) indicate an establishment date after 1990, limiting how they could appeal to their past. Similar to Beverland (2006) and Maguire et al. (2013), web pages also highlight where the wine is produced and the commitment to products. Moreover, details are presented on the businesses' sustainability efforts (e.g. ...
Article
Purpose-Family businesses feature prominently in economies, including the South African wine industry, using websites to convey their family identity. This research paper aims to explore the family identity elements that family wineries use on their websites, their alignment and how these are communicated online. Design/methodology/approach-Based on Gioia's methodology, a two-pronged approach was used to analyze 113 wineries' websites' text using Atlas. ti from an interpretivist perspective. Findings-South African wineries use corporate identity, corporate personality and corporate expression to illustrate their familiness on their websites. It is portrayed through their family name and heritage, supported by their direction, purpose and aspirations, which emerge from the family identity and personality. These are dynamic and expressed through verbal and visual elements. Wineries described their behaviour, relevant competencies and passion as personality traits. Sustainability was considered an integral part of their brand promise, closely related to their family identity and personality, reflecting their family-oriented philosophy. These findings highlight the integration that exists among these components. Practical implications-Theoretically, this study proposes a family business brand identity framework emphasising the centrality of familiness to its identity, personality and expression. Using websites to illustrate this familiness is emphasised with the recommendation that family businesses leverage this unique attribute in their identity to communicate their authenticity. Originality/value-This study contributes to understanding what family wineries communicate on their websites, specifically by examining the elements necessary to create a family business brand based on the interrelationship between family identity, personality and expression with familiness at its core, resulting in a proposed family business brand identity framework.
... Furthermore, while the omnichannel literature has clearly highlighted the relevance of seamlessness, no prior research has focused on its effects on consumer perceptions of brand authenticity. This is despite authenticity, which has been defined as a cornerstone of contemporary marketing (Beverland, 2006), emerging as a critical brand characteristic that consumers expect in a purchase experience. Some scholars (e.g., Salvietti et al., 2022) have called for research examining how companies can keep their brand identity while "integrating all the different channels so as to offer a seamless but authentic experience" (p. ...
... The notion of brand authenticity revolves around what is true, original, or genuine (Ilicic & Webster, 2016;Moulard et al., 2016;Napoli et al., 2014;Spiggle et al., 2012). Authentic brands are characterized by genuineness, sincerity, originality, quality commitment, connection to heritage, and continuity (Beverland, 2006;Napoli et al., 2014). ...
Article
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Omnichannel represents a customer-oriented distribution paradigm through which retailers can deliver a seamless customer experience and create an authentic brand narrative that is communicated to customers across diverse touchpoints. Despite the increasing relevance of the omnichannel approach, research on how omnichannel can affect the customer experience remains scant. This research consists of a qualitative study and three experimental studies. Drawing from signaling theory, we contend that the signal congruency established by omnichannel-where all the channels are aligned and convey a consistent message to customers-can enhance consumers' purchase intention and perceptions of brand authenticity. We further investigate the role of brand authenticity as a mediator of the relationship between multichannel customer experience (seamless vs. non-seamless) and purchase intention, as well as of brand untrustworthiness as a moderator of the relationship between multichannel customer experience and brand authenticity. The results show that a seamless multichannel customer experience has a significant main effect on purchase intention and that participants in the seamless multichannel customer experience condition perceive the brand as more authentic than those in the non-seamless multichannel customer experience condition. Both the mediation and moderation hypotheses are supported. These findings enhance the literature on signaling theory and omnichannel. They also provide insightful implications for retailers in terms of managing the omnichannel customer experience. Overall, this study integrates the research areas of brand authenticity and omnichannel and provides valuable insights by indicating how seamlessness can boost consumers' perception of brand authenticity. Furthermore, the study advances our knowledge by investigating the impact of brand authenticity as both a result of the omnichannel customer experience and a predictor of purchase intention.
... Research shows that these highly authentic brands generate stronger and more positive attitudinal and emotional responses from consumers (Choi et al., 2015;Lasaleta & Loveland, 2019). This phenomenon has been observed with brands in different product and service categories, such as luxury goods (Holmqvist et al., 2020;Kapferer & Bastien, 2009), wines (Beverland, 2005(Beverland, , 2006, food (Groves, 2001), but also touristic destinations (Wang, 1999), museums (Grayson & Martinec, 2004), artistic performances (Daniel, 1996), cars (Leigh et al., 2006), fashion (Choi et al., 2015) or fast-moving consumer goods (Morhart et al., 2015). These findings lead to our overarching proposition that perceptions of authenticity might also be an important determinant of favorable attitudes and positive emotions towards higher education institutions. ...
... Second, our research complements existing frameworks with service gapthe difference between customers' expectations about a specific service and their actual experienceas one specific authenticity cue that have profound effects on customers' perceptions of authenticity. While prior research had either identified some typologies of cues that shape PBA (Beverland, 2006;Choi et al., 2015;Napoli et al., 2014), or some particular indexical cues (Carsana & Jolibert, 2018;Ewing et al., 2012), we here bring to the literature by identifying service gap as a newly discovered antecedent of PBA, thus adding to the theory on brand authenticity and indexical cues (Grayson & Martinec, 2004). ...
Article
Higher education institutions (HEIs) engage more and more in branding activities to sustain an advantage in an increasingly high competitive environment. In such a pressing managerial context, research on brand management in the specific context of higher education expanded over the past few years. While research indicates that brand authenticity is more and more important for consumers in the consumption sphere, it has remained unexplored in the context of HEIs. This paper contributes to the developing research area on HEIs branding by examining the determinants and implications of brand authenticity for those institutions. Across one field study with two different HEIs, we identify indexical, iconic and existential cues as antecedents of authenticity perceptions and examine the effects of such perceptions on theoretically grounded practical outcomes: brand attitude, emotional attachment, word-of-mouth, and willingness-to-pay. The study revealed that HEIs authenticity perceptions are a strong predictor of brand attitude, positive word-of-mouth, and emotional brand attachment.
... For a brand, authenticity means incorporating features like the brand's history and heritage (Brown et al., 2003), craftsmanship Frontiers in Blockchain frontiersin.org (Beverland, 2006), nostalgia (Beverland et al., 2008), sincerity (Thompson et al., 2006), quality (Beverland, 2006), and design consistency (Beverland et al., 2008). Product authenticity is associated with brand authenticity and brand value (Turunen, 2018) which makes it a holistic marketing tool to initiate and maintain brand loyalty and attachment among consumers (Choi FIGURE 11 Basic difference in functioning of authentic, grey, and black market. ...
... For a brand, authenticity means incorporating features like the brand's history and heritage (Brown et al., 2003), craftsmanship Frontiers in Blockchain frontiersin.org (Beverland, 2006), nostalgia (Beverland et al., 2008), sincerity (Thompson et al., 2006), quality (Beverland, 2006), and design consistency (Beverland et al., 2008). Product authenticity is associated with brand authenticity and brand value (Turunen, 2018) which makes it a holistic marketing tool to initiate and maintain brand loyalty and attachment among consumers (Choi FIGURE 11 Basic difference in functioning of authentic, grey, and black market. ...
Article
Full-text available
Blockchain Technology has shown tremendous potential to be a foundation for the currently shifting paradigm towards more traceable and transparent supply chains. This review highlights the opportunities that exist in adapting Blockchain Technology in the fashion and textile supply chain, while also providing insight into the challenges of adopting this technology. This paper provides a systematic review of the potential of Blockchain Technology within the fashion and textile industry’s supply chain to analyse its role in traceability, transparency, and product authenticity. To achieve this, a substantive number of research papers and non-scholarly resources have been scrutinised. An emphasis was placed on topics regarding Blockchain Technology (BT), the fashion and textile industry and supply chain (manufacturing and distribution), traceability, transparency, and product authenticity. The selected research papers range from empirical analysis, argumentative, case studies, opinion articles, review articles, short reports, and book chapters.
... In total, 42 wineries (33.6%) indicate their family nature by including "family" in the winery name, though this was not always carried over in the website address. Some highlight their family connectedness through their name (Beverland, 2006), the brand story , and the "people" pages on the site. The "people" page includes a discussion of the contribution of a range of individuals, including employees ...
... Sixty-seven wineries (53.6%) indicate an establishment date after 1990, limiting how they could appeal to their past. Similar to Beverland (2006) and Maguire et al. (2013), web pages also highlight where the wine is produced and the commitment to products. Moreover, details are presented on the businesses' sustainability efforts (e.g. ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Family businesses feature prominently in economies, including the South African wine industry, using websites to convey their family identity. This research paper aims to explore the family identity elements that family wineries use on their websites, their alignment and how these are communicated online. Design/methodology/approach Based on Gioia’s methodology, a two-pronged approach was used to analyze 113 wineries’ websites’ text using Atlas. ti from an interpretivist perspective. Findings South African wineries use corporate identity, corporate personality and corporate expression to illustrate their familiness on their websites. It is portrayed through their family name and heritage, supported by their direction, purpose and aspirations, which emerge from the family identity and personality. These are dynamic and expressed through verbal and visual elements. Wineries described their behaviour, relevant competencies and passion as personality traits. Sustainability was considered an integral part of their brand promise, closely related to their family identity and personality, reflecting their family-oriented philosophy. These findings highlight the integration that exists among these components. Practical implications Theoretically, this study proposes a family business brand identity framework emphasising the centrality of familiness to its identity, personality and expression. Using websites to illustrate this familiness is emphasised with the recommendation that family businesses leverage this unique attribute in their identity to communicate their authenticity. Originality/value This study contributes to understanding what family wineries communicate on their websites, specifically by examining the elements necessary to create a family business brand based on the interrelationship between family identity, personality and expression with familiness at its core, resulting in a proposed family business brand identity framework.
... Authenticity and brand aura. The literature has widely studied the perceived authenticity of the brand (Alexander, 2009;Beverland, 2006;Morhart et al., 2015) as the perception of brand genuineness. This multifaceted concept involves up to six brand attributes: heritage, stylistic consistency, quality commitment, relation to a place, method of production and the downplay of commercial motives (Beverland, 2006). ...
... The literature has widely studied the perceived authenticity of the brand (Alexander, 2009;Beverland, 2006;Morhart et al., 2015) as the perception of brand genuineness. This multifaceted concept involves up to six brand attributes: heritage, stylistic consistency, quality commitment, relation to a place, method of production and the downplay of commercial motives (Beverland, 2006). "Aura" refers to the essence of the brand that crystallizes the attributes of authenticity; it includes the place of manufacture, the corporate brand heritage, and the methods of production, but it goes beyond this-it designates the way in which all of these factors are combined and put forward by managers (Alexander, 2009). ...
Article
This paper addresses the question of the resources that consumers rely on when faced with products that communicate very little. When consumers purchase items from Christian abbeys, this question is particularly significant given that these organizations, while sharing a common history, are spatially dispersed. Through qualitative interviews with purchasers of monastic products, our research confirms the contagion process from products’ origin to consumers, and proposes the new concept of World of Origin (WOO), a cloud-like representation serving as an extrinsic source of meaning and acting as a substitute for strong brand narratives. Distinct from Country of Origin, terroir, brand aura, and heritage, WOO is an addition to the marketing conceptual toolbox, facilitating a thinner grain analysis of consumption phenomena. The contagious power of WOO enriches the research on the context’s influence and enables a discussion of the consequences of consumers themselves creating embellished or even false inventions of the past.
... See, e. g.,Beverland, 2006;H arvey,W hite, and Frost,2 014. 10 CompareK arpik, 2010;R eckwitz,2 017; Callon, Méadel, and Rabeharisoa, 2002. 11 Cf. the studies by Rainer,K ister,a nd Steiner,2 019;P ütz, Rainer,a nd Steiner,2 020. 12 Today, the exoticising Touareg brand is an exception to the rule, especiallyasthis ethnic group is not reallyp resent in Moroccoa nd livesf ar away from the winegrowingr egions in the North.Branding Wine in Morocco: New Efforts to Qualify aC ontested Commodity ...
Chapter
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Alcohol drinking and marketing remains an issue in contemporary MENA countries. Today, Morocco is a relatively important wine producing and consuming country and endeavours to reposition and enhance the quality and image of its product. Advertisements for locally produced wine, a controversial commodityin an Islamic environment, have gained new prominence, at least in local magazines written in French. As the snapshot “Branding Wine in Morocco: New Efforts to Qualify a Contested Commodity,” the adverts adapt to aglobal visual language to address the senses of both a young and a more settled local public and to singularise and qualify the newly created brands in the eyes of these potential consumers. Open access: https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/9783110741100-011/html
... Heritage is important to a brand's identity and equity in the luxury industry. It contributes to brand and product differentiation (Dion & Borraz, 2015) and is associated with brand reliability (Beverland, 2006). As the luxury industry continuously develops new and innovative products and experiences (Robert & Armitage, 2015), it is crucial to investigate how advertising messages emphasizing innovation and newness (compared to tradition) impact consumer perception. ...
Article
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Luxury brands are increasingly using social media messages as their ads to consumers. This paper investigates the impact of regulatory focus on brand attitudes after research participants viewed a luxury brand’s message on social media. The research question is whether promotion-focused consumers and prevention-focused consumers have different responses to messages that emphasize either innovation or tradition. Based on an online experiment, this research findings show that the framing of the message interacts with regulatory focus. An ad that emphasizes innovation yields more favorable brand attitudes than an ad that emphasizes tradition among promotion-focused consumers. However, this does not happen among prevention-focused consumers. This research provides theoretical implications and practical suggestions for industry practitioners.
... Brand authenticitythe extent to which a brand is perceived to be faithful and true towards itself and its consumers (Morhart et al., 2015) signals the continuity, originality, reliability, genuineness or naturalness of a brand (Moulard et al., 2021). Moreover, for a firm's CSR effort to be perceived by consumers as authentic, it must be seen as socially connected (Beverland, 2006). Ultimately, socially connected brands engage with their stakeholders through co-creation (Mazutis and Slawinski, 2015) to drive brand equity (Harmeling et al., 2017). ...
Article
Purpose In response to the rise of socially conscious consumers, brands have been taking a strategic approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR) to drive brand equity. Nevertheless, merely engaging in CSR is not enough to have a positive impact on the value consumers give to a brand. The success of a CSR program depends on its consumers’ perceived authenticity. Therefore, this study aims to investigate how the perception of CSR authenticity, and consequently brand equity, can be enhanced by leveraging brand value co-creation. Design/methodology/approach The study uses a mixed-method approach to test its hypotheses. Study 1 collects survey data from a national representative sample in the USA, which is analyzed using structural equation modeling. Study 2 collects experimental data from a public university’s research pool, also in the USA, which is analyzed using ANOVA and mediation analysis. Findings This study demonstrates that when consumers believe that a brand is co-creative – i.e. consumers are allowed to participate in the creation of value – they will likely perceive the brand’s CSR program as more authentic, which in turn will positively affect brand equity. Originality/value The findings of this study offer implications for academics and brand managers interested on how to effectively leverage CSR for brand building. Specifically, it demonstrates that embracing CSR alone may not be sufficient to enhance brand equity and that brand managers should consider leveraging co-creation to strengthen perceptions of CSR authenticity.
... Packaging and branding also play a crucial role in wine preference. Studies have shown that the design of the label and the bottle can significantly impact how consumers perceive the wine's quality and taste (Beverland, 2006). Additionally, the price of the wine can also influence preference, with people often associating higher-priced wines with better quality (Plassmann & Weber, 2015). ...
Book
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The structure of the book is designed to provide a comprehensive exploration of the principles of neuromarketing and their application to the wine production industry in the Abruzzo region of Italy. The book is divided into several sections that build on each other to create a coherent narrative and provide a thorough analysis of the topic. Section 2, introduces the concept of decision-making and its relevance to marketing, psychology, and neuroscience. This section also discusses the emerging field of neuroeconomics, which combines principles from neuroscience and economics to study decision-making processes. Section 3, explores the science of neuromarketing, including its history, tools, and methods. This section also discusses the benefits of using neuromarketing to uncover hidden motivations of consumers and gain insights into their emotional and cognitive responses to marketing stimuli. Section 4, focuses on individual differences in consumer behavior and preferences and how they can be studied using neuromarketing techniques. This section also explores the role of aesthetic properties of products in consumer decision-making. Section 5, delves into the role of color in decision-making processes, including its properties, perception, and preference. This section also discusses the difficulties associated with studying color and its use in marketing. Section 6, examines the wine industry and its properties, as well as consumer preferences in relation to wine. This section argues that wine is an ideal product for neuromarketing research due to its unique properties and consumer appeal. Section 7, explores the concept of cross modal correspondence, which refers to the relationship between different sensory modalities such as color, taste, and aroma. This section discusses color associations and meanings, as well as their relationship with emotions and consumer expectations. Section 8, focuses specifically on the use of color in the wine industry, including explicit and implicit consumer preferences. This section presents the results of empirical research on the impact of label color on consumer behavior and provides a detailed discussion of the findings. Section 9, concludes the book and discusses potential new directions for research and the limitations of the current study. Finally, the book ends with a section on references and supplementary materials. Overall, the structure of the book is designed to provide a comprehensive analysis of the principles of neuromarketing and their application to the wine industry, with a particular emphasis on the role of color in consumer decision-making processes.
... It reflects a brand's timelessness, historicity, and its ability to transcend trends (Morhart et al., 2015), to establish a bigger reach for the brand, Adidas uses a multi-brand strategy that includes Adidas, Reebok, TaylorMade, Rockport, and wide range of ice hockey equipment (CCM). Regarding the past-related aspect, the continuity dimension resembles the concept of pedigree (Beverland, 2006). ...
... To illustrate, higher perceived quality will make the brand more transparent and undisguised in relaying its resonant story, increasing the authenticity. This is akin to the notion that authentic products are deemed high quality by consumers (Beverland, 2006;Kov acs et al., 2014). In recent work, Phung et al. (2019) demonstrate that in the context of ethnic cuisine in a restaurant, perception of authenticity and perceived quality are strongly correlated. ...
Article
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Purpose-This study aims to demonstrate that brand experiences can influence perceived brand authenticity, and perceived quality mediates this link. The proposed nomological net also assesses the impact of perceived quality and brand authenticity on consumers' loyalty intentions, a key consumer-level outcome. Design/methodology/approach-A survey method based on data from a sample of 405 new car owners was used for empirical analysis. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypotheses. Findings-The results provide broad support for the framework. All the direct effects and the key indirect effect are significant, as predicted. Social implications-As consumers are seeking brands that are genuine in its communication and behavior, building authenticity will be crucial to engage customers and create meaningful social values. Originality/value-This work develops a framework and empirical evidence of how experiential marketing can contribute to brand authenticity directly and through perceived quality.
... In contrast, when product involvement is lower, followers' intentions will not be the result of deep emotional responses or reflective cognitive responses but of superficial information processing (Petty and Cacioppo, 1986). Hence, highly involved followers are expected to devote a cognitive effort to valuing a brand (Malär et al., 2011) and, therefore, authenticity will be more consequential to them (Beverland, 2006). Thus, product involvement is likely to strengthen the direct relationship between brand authenticity and the consumers' behavioural intentions. ...
Article
Purpose This paper aims to examine the relationship between the interaction of the social media manager’s customer orientation and the service climate perceived by supervisors, on the customer’s perception of brand authenticity and, through it, on the willingness to pay a price premium. Design/methodology/approach This study uses triadic data from 200 social media followers, 20 social media managers and 20 supervisors from a range of industries. Findings The findings show that the customer orientation of the brand social media managers interacts with their work context to influence social media followers’ perceptions of brand authenticity, and ultimately, their willingness to pay a premium price. Finally, product involvement moderates the relationship between brand authenticity and willingness to pay a premium price. Research limitations/implications This study shows how and when the disposition of brand social media managers affects the attitudes and intentions of the social media followers. Further research should continue this novel line of research and explore in greater depth the impact of social media managers and their environments. Practical implications Social media managers’ values should fit those of their organization. This organization-person fit reflects on social media and improves social media followers’ perceptions of brand authenticity and, consequently, their willingness to pay a premium price. Originality/value Leveraging participation in social media is currently a key issue for firms. However, the internal determinants of successful social media usage have received limited attention from researchers. Therefore, this research contributes to the social media literature by suggesting the need to consider the characteristics of social media managers and their context to promote the outcomes of social media usage, specifically brand authenticity and willingness to pay a premium price.
... To illustrate, higher perceived quality will make the brand more transparent and undisguised in relaying its resonant story, increasing the authenticity. This is akin to the notion that authentic products are deemed high quality by consumers (Beverland, 2006;Kov acs et al., 2014). In recent work, Phung et al. (2019) demonstrate that in the context of ethnic cuisine in a restaurant, perception of authenticity and perceived quality are strongly correlated. ...
Article
Purpose This study aims to demonstrate that brand experiences can influence perceived brand authenticity, and perceived quality mediates this link. The proposed nomological net also assesses the impact of perceived quality and brand authenticity on consumers’ loyalty intentions, a key consumer-level outcome. Design/methodology/approach A survey method based on data from a sample of 405 new car owners was used for empirical analysis. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypotheses. Findings The results provide broad support for the framework. All the direct effects and the key indirect effect are significant, as predicted. Social implications As consumers are seeking brands that are genuine in its communication and behavior, building authenticity will be crucial to engage customers and create meaningful social values. Originality/value This work develops a framework and empirical evidence of how experiential marketing can contribute to brand authenticity directly and through perceived quality.
... Inthiscontextofuncertaintyandhighcompetition,influencedbythefatiguedeterminedby consumers'overchoice,wewitnessanamplifiedimportanceoftheintangibleassetsofbrandsand authenticityappearstobeareplytohyperrealityandglobalness (Arnould&Price,2003;Ballantyne &Varey,2006;Lazzini,Lazzini,Balluchi,&Mazza,2022).Assuch,theconceptofauthenticity wasfoundtobeoneofthe"cornerstonesofcontemporarymarketing" (Brown,Kozinets,&Sherry, 2003)andanewbusinessimperativefortheexperienceeconomy (Gilmore&Pine,2007;Södergren, 2021).Thesefactsmaybeevengreaterformanagersdealingwithdifferenttypologiesofconsumers thatdon'tsharethesamebehaviour,perceptionandpreferences.Inadigitalandvirtualcommunicative platforms world, not paradoxically, the "quest for authenticity" from consumers is becoming more emphasizedandtodayitisdefinedasasociallyconstructedphenomenon (Beverland&Farrelly,2010;Napoli,Dickinson,Beverland,&Farrelly,2014;Pattuglia&Mingione,2017;Södergren,2021).Onthis line,anumberofscholarshaveclaimedthatbrandauthenticityhasthecapabilitytolegitimizeabrand withinitscontextanditsconsumers (Beverland,2005(Beverland, ,2006Beverland,Farrelly,&Quester,2010;Grayson&Martinec,2004;Kates,2004;Rose&Wood,2005;Thompson,Rindfleisch,&Arsel,2006). ...
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The purpose of this study is to better understand the consumer behaviour, analysing the impact of brand authenticity on two main behavioural outcomes. The research aims also at finding out the behavioural differences of each generational cohort and to understand the effects on consumers' willingness to pay a premium price and on brand loyalty in the case of technological brands. The study follows a quantitative research design and uses a survey as a tool to collect data. The present work may suggest firms to be more targeted in their approach to create competitive advantage and strong relationships with their audiences. In present times, academics and practitioners must therefore recognize and take into consideration the differences across generational cohorts when studying and developing new marketing strategies.
... Third, moreover, this research also suggests that music festivals can be viewed as consumer commodities (Rojek, 2013) and simulated settings (Firat and Venkatesh, 1995) since festivals attempt to create a unique and distinctive image (Sam Kim et al., 2018) to impact festival brand loyalty (Kim et al., 2018). Consequently, when the festivalgoers have prior knowledge of the brand, it creates a satisfactory and delightful consumer experience (Beverland, 2006). Moreover, a brand admirer visiting music festivals can meet similar admirers, leading to psychological bonding where the love for the brand is a common characteristic (Carlson et al., 2008). ...
Article
Purpose This study aims to examines how renaming music festivals with brand names affect festivalgoers' purchase intention in a Southwestern European country. Design/methodology/approach This study uses 291 festivalgoers' responses attending five music festivals in a Southwestern European country with structural equation modeling. Findings The study shows that the brand experience at the music festival directly influences brand attitude, which in turn positively influences purchase intention. The results also show the direct impact of event-sponsor fit on brand image transfer (BIT), positively affecting purchase intention. Research limitations/implications The study examined only five music festivals in a Southwestern European country. Further studies can investigate multiple music festivals in different geographic regions. Four of the five sponsoring brands of the music festivals are telecommunication operators. Also, this study did not explore the differences in the effect of destination image, artist image and festivalgoers' attachment to music festivals. Practical implications The brand sponsorship of music festivals should ensure the event-sponsor fit to impact BIT and purchase intention positively. A synergy between events and sponsors must be created to involve consumers with the brands. Originality/value This study uses congruity theory in a music festival setting. The investigation is unique as it is conducted at five music festivals in a Southwestern European country.
... 다섯 번째 스포츠 브랜드 진정성 속성은 Authority(권위성)로 추 출되었으며, 스포츠 브랜드가 커뮤니케이션 하는 스포츠의 종목, 리 그, 팀, 선수 등의 상징적 요소들에 대한 권위가 소비자들에게 감정 적 믿음으로 인식되며, 브랜드의 권위로 느껴져서 스포츠 브랜드가 진정성 있음을 인식하게 한다. 심층 면접에서 '스키 같은 위험한 운 동에서의 기술 연구', '장비 연구 100년의 헤리티지', '탑 레벨 선수 들의 사용', '그랜드 슬램 대회의 후원', '테니스에서 로저 페더러', '유에스 오픈에서의 공식 볼', '선수로서 큰 무대 체험', '종목의 상징 성을 인식시키기 위한 이벤트', '스포츠 브랜드 로고가 주는 이미지, 권위', '푸마가 스포츠에서 사라져 가는 이유' 와 같은 스포츠 브랜 드를 권위있게 해주는 사례와 그렇지 않은 스포츠 브랜드 사례를 추 출하였고, 기존 연구(Alexander, 2009;Beverland, 2006;Seo, 2012)에서 타 산업의 권위 관련 속성과의 조화 과 정을 통해 5개의 세부 항목이 도출되었다. 여섯 번째 심층 면접 결과 추출된 스포츠 브랜드 진정성 속성은 Achievement(성취성)으로, 스포츠 브랜드가 스포츠 활동의 참여를 통 해 신체적/정신적 성취, 기록 향상, 승리 등을 고무하게(encourage)하 는지에 대한 정도이다. ...
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PURPOSE This study aimed to identify the dimensions of sport brand authenticity and to develop a valid and reliable scale for measuring such dimensions. METHODS Along with a sequential mixed method design, qualitative researches were conducted (a literature review on brand authenticity and the inherent value of sport, 5 one-to-one expert interviews, and a Delphi survey of 10 researchers). Based on the qualitative research results, an EFA (n=304), 2 times CFA (1st: n=304, 2nd: n=311), and correlation analysis using the other scale (brand relationship quality, brand attachment, brand credibility) were conducted to test reliability, construct validity, and criterion-related validity. RESULTS In the qualitative research results, 8 dimensions with 36 items were extracted; however 6 dimensions (originality, connectedness, legitimacy, authority, sport spirit, and expertise) with 28 items were identified as appropriate structures from EFA and CFA, and the relations between all the dimensions and other scales related to consumer attitude were statistically significant in the correlation analysis. CONCLUSIONS The findings suggest that the scale in this study could provide a new and specific perspective on sport brand authenticity, which is constructed using a general aspect and a sport specific aspect, and an understanding of the concept of sport brand authenticity in other sport industries.
... Günümüzde özgünlüğü yakalayan markalar, sürekliliğe sahip olan ve yaşanan değişimleri bünyesine adapte ederek modern zamanda yaşananları takip eden markalardır (Beverland, 2006;Beverland vd., 2008). Marka özgünlüğü kavramı Bruhn vd., (2012) tarafından dört boyutta ele alınmaktadır. ...
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Amaç – Bir marka eğer özgünse tüketicinin zihninde daha çok yer edinmekte ve daha çok tercih edilmektedir. Markanın özgünlüğü, uzun dönemli tüketici-marka ilişkisi için temel bir unsurdur. Marka aşkı ise tüketicinin markaya olan tutkusunu ve markaya bağlanma derecesini içermektedir. Bu çalışmanın amacı, marka özgünlüğünün marka tercihi ile arasındaki ilişkide marka aşkının aracılık etkisini incelemektir. Yöntem – İzmir ilinde yaşayan 18 yaşından büyük, Samsung marka cep telefonu kullanan tüketicilere kolayda örnekleme yöntemi ile uygulanan anket çalışmasıyla, Samsung markası üzerinden; marka özgünlüğü kavramı kapsamında yer alan süreklilik, orijinallik, güvenilirlik ve doğallık boyutlarının marka tercihi üzerindeki etkisinde marka aşkının aracılık etkisi tespit edilmeye çalışılmıştır. Anket verileri, SPSS 18 ve AMOS 22 programları kullanılarak ve yapısal eşitlik modelinden yararlanılarak analiz edilmiştir. Bulgular – Marka özgünlüğünün süreklilik ve orijinallik boyutlarının marka tercihi üzerinde anlamlı bir etkisinin olmadığı, güvenilirlik ve doğallık boyutlarının ise anlamlı bir etkisinin olduğu belirlenmiştir. Ayrıca marka özgünlüğü ile marka tercihi arasındaki ilişkide marka aşkının aracılık etkisinin olduğu saptanmıştır. Tartışma – Markanın tercih edilebilirliğinde marka aşkının önemli bir etkiye sahip olması markanın gelecekte de tercih edilebilmesinde etkili bir faktör olduğunu göstermektedir. Marka tüketicilerin zihninde güvenilir ve özgün bir marka olarak yer edindiğinde, markanın başkalarına tavsiye edilme olasılığı da artabilecektir. Markanın istikrarlı ve tutarlı olması, yeniliklere uyum sağlayabilmesi, ayrıca markanın güvenilir ve gerçekçi olması, markaya karşı güveni ve bağlılığı yükseltmektedir. Böylece tüketicilerin deneyimleri sonucu oluşan uzun süreli bağlılığın marka aşkına dönüşmesiyle, markanın bir sonraki alımlarda tercih edilebilirliği artabilecektir. Purpose – If a brand is authentic, it has more place in the mind of the consumer and it is more preferred. The authenticity of the brand is an essential element for a long-term consumer-brand relationship. Brand love includes the consumer’s passion for the brand and the degree of attachment to the brand. This study’s purpose is to examine the mediating effect of brand love in the relationship between brand authenticity and brand preference. Design/methodology/approach – It was attempted to determine the mediating effect of brand love on the effect of continuity, originality, reliability and naturalness dimensions on brand preference within the scope of the concept of brand authenticity through the survey which was carried out with easy sampling method to consumers over 18 years of age living in Izmir and use Samsung brand mobile phone. The survey data was analyzed using the SPSS 18 and AMOS 22 programs and using the structural equity model. Findings – – It was concluded that the continuity and authenticity dimensions of brand authenticity do not have a significant effect on brand preference, but the reliability and naturalness dimensions have a significant effect on brand preference. Also brand love has a mediating effect on the relationship between brand authenticity and brand preference. Discussion – The fact that brand love has a significant effect on the preferability of the brand shows that it is an effective factor in the preference of the brand in the future. When the brand is placed in the minds of consumers as a reliable and original brand, the possibility of recommending the brand to others may increase. The fact that the brand is stable and consistent, can adapt to innovations, and is reliable and realistic enhances the trust and loyalty to the brand. Thus, with the turning of longterm commitment into brand love as a result of consumers’ experiences, the preferability of the brand in the next purchases will be able to increase.
... Brand heritage is considered a key strategic asset for brands (Urde, Greyser, and Balmer 2007), and it increases legitimacy (Newman, Gorlin, and Dhar 2014). Messaging related to brand heritage promotes consumer perceptions of brand reliability (Beverland 2006). Moreover, internal consistency in messaging, particularly over time, benefits brands (Rose et al. 2016;Spiggle, Nguyen, and Caravella 2012). ...
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Consumer perceptions of brand motives related to corporate environmental responsibility affect the decisions of both corporations and consumers. Yet prior literature has typically viewed these firm motives as dichotomous, either solely intrinsic or solely extrinsic. The authors argue for a novel approach to positioning sustainability motives, where the brand communicates both intrinsic and extrinsic benefits together, as a joint motive. With a joint motive, a brand can highlight how an effort can benefit both planet and business with a “doing well by doing good” approach. Across five experiments, including a field study on Facebook, this research investigates the positive impact of the joint motive and its ability to enhance the credibility of sustainable initiatives via heightened perceptions of trustworthiness and expertise. Results provide converging evidence for the benefits of presenting a joint motive for sustainability efforts with implications for policy and practice.
... Authenticity is seen as an important factor for brands and it has been posited that brands should induce nostalgia and heritage to be seen authentic or unique (Brown et al. 2003). In a study of the luxury wine industry, six authenticity attributes were identified: heritage and pedigree, stylistic consistency, quality commitment, relationship to place, method of production, and downplaying commercial motives (Beverland 2006). These attributes were also validated in a mass-market context, and were shown to assert the authenticity (Alexander 2009). ...
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Authenticity has been discussed as an important characteristic of successful online communication (Gilpin et al. 2010), yet little is known about its antecedents and consequences. This research examines the mediating role of authenticity in the relationship between two message attributes of communication quality, responsiveness and transparency, and the three dimensions of trust: competency, integrity, and benevolence. The results of an online survey show that the two message characteristics, responsiveness and transparency, both positively impact perceptions of authenticity. Moreover, authenticity partially mediates the paths from responsiveness to benevolence and integrity, and fully mediates the paths from transparency to benevolence, integrity, and competency. The study findings suggest that authenticity is an important factor for assessing the trustworthiness of interactive communications. 3
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This thesis analyses the factors that influence the celebrity endorser’s perceived authenticity and its impact on the promoted brand in covert social media marketing. To examine consumer behaviour, the Persuasion Knowledge Model and Attribution Theory were integrated, and a theoretical framework was then developed. In total, 653 social media users were recruited to participate in the research, and structural equation modelling was conducted to test the proposed model. The results confirm that (1) activated persuasion knowledge negatively influences celebrity endorser’s perceived authenticity in covert social media marketing; (2) celebrity-brand congruity does not have a significant impact on the endorser’s perceived authenticity; (3) celebrity’s expertise positively influences the celebrity endorser’s perceived authenticity when endorsing products related to his or her area of expertise; (4) the celebrity’s perceived attractiveness has a positive impact on the celebrity’s perceived authenticity when endorsing attractiveness enhancing products covertly in social media; and (5) perceived authenticity of a celebrity endorser positively influences brand attitudes and, consequently, behavioural intentions. Both theoretical and managerial implications are drawn, suggesting directions for future studies.
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Background: For a significant subset of agricultural products, including coffee, wine, and tea, sensory perceptions of terroir (i.e., characteristic flavors imparted by the growing environment) are tightly linked to the product's value. With increasing climate change, it is critical to understand how shifts in climate, such as changes in precipitation, may interact with management practices (e.g., cultivar selection) to impact sensory quality in terroir-driven crops, and what biochemical compounds may be associated with those impacts. Here, sensory quality and volatile profile composition were assessed for four Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) cultivars grown in a field experiment where precipitation was reduced by rainout shelters, resulting in 14% lower soil moisture on average. Results: Our results indicate an overall increase in yield coincident with a moderate decrease in sensory quality in response to reduced precipitation. The presence and magnitude of the sensory quality shift varied by cultivar and sensory attribute, though the Acidity attribute was consistently negatively impacted across cultivars, albeit with a high degree of uncertainty. Additionally, 31 volatile compounds were identified across green coffee samples that were variably impacted by reduced precipitation. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified patterns in volatile clustering associated with sensory attributes that suggest reduced precipitation effects on sensory attributes may depend on non-linear combinations of secondary metabolites. Conclusion: Ultimately, our results advance efforts to improve predictions of climate impacts on coffee-growing landscapes and communities and highlight the value of considering indicators of harvest value beyond yield to improve economic forecasts for agroecosystems under climate change. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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Literatürde insanların tüketimlerini etkileyen faktörler, kültürel değerler, yaşam tarzı ve çevre olarak belirlenmektedir. Çeşitlendirecek olunursa, gelir düzeyi, yaş, meslek, cinsiyet, psikolojik etkiler gibi faktörler insanların satın alma sürecinde etkilidir. Lüks tüketiminde ise insanların davranış şekillerini belirleyen unsurlar; ürünün fiyatı, marka değeri, kalitesi, bilinilirliği, tüketicilerin dahil oldukları zümre, ürünün nadir elde edilebilirliği, tasarımı ve niş pazarlar olarak belirlenmektedir. Bu çalışmanın amacı, kişileri lükse özenmeye ve tüketmeye yönlendiren etmenlerin neler olduğunu belirlemek, bu faktörleri ölçümlemek ve bunlarla ilgili analizler yapmaktır. Buna bağlı olarak da oluşan bu lüks tüketim algısının bireylerin marka tercihleri üzerindeki etkilerini araştırmaktır. Literatüre bilimsel bir çalışma daha ilave edilmesi adına yapılan bu çalışmada 1980 yılı öncesi doğumlu olan X kuşağı, 1980-2000 yılları arası doğumlu olan Y kuşağı ve 2000 yılı sonrası doğumlu Z kuşağı nüfusunun lüks algısı etkisiyle marka tercihlerinde nelerin etkili olduğu ve seçimlerin nelere göre yapıldığı konuları göz önünde tutulmuş ve araştırma kapsamında bulguların analiz sonuçları elde edilmiştir. Yapılan analizin sonuçlarına göre, lüks tüketim algısı ölçek ve alt boyut puanlarının cinsiyete göre anlamlı farklılık göstermediği, kuşağa göre anlamlı farklılık göstermediği, öğrenim durumuna göre anlamlı farklılık göstermediği, medeni duruma göre anlamlı farklılık göstermediği, çalıştığı sektöre göre anlamlı farklılık göstermediği tespit edilmiştir.
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This study explored the concept of green brand authenticity in tourism and its relationships with relevant variables by using a mixed method. Firstly, the content analysis of interview revealed four dimensions of green brand authenticity: green practice, green servicescape, green support for locals, and green customer engagement. Then, the analysis of a total of 352 survey responses collected through an online research panel uncovered brand-self congruence as the most significant antecedent of green brand authenticity and green customer engagement as the most impactful dimension on the outcome variables. Brand commercialization significantly moderated the relationships among the study variables.
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Purpose This paper aims to investigate the key characteristics of parent brands and the relationships among customer perceived value (a second-order construct containing financial, functional, individual and social attributes), parent brand loyalty and the willingness to pay for a premium extended brand. Moreover, the moderating effect of self–brand integration on the influences in the model is examined. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected in two countries, the USA ( n = 535) and China ( n = 511), through an online survey. Structural equation modeling and a multi-group analysis were used to analyze the data. Findings The results show that perceived quality and premium brand authenticity are two important predictors of perceived value. The relationships among perceived value, parent brand loyalty and willingness to pay for an extended premium brand were significantly supported. In addition, self–brand integration was found to moderate the relationship between perceived value and loyalty to the parent brand. Practical implications Wine marketers and managers can use recommendations to establish effective brand extension strategies to help the industry know what essential characteristics of a parent brand to focus on and maintain sustainable development through the customer–extended brand relationship. Originality/value Previous researchers have discussed wine consumption behaviors or branding strategies. By limiting combining two theories (flow theory and the theory of planned behavior), this paper proposes a chain of behaviors to optimize customer experience to develop a brand extension strategy based on key characteristics of the parent brand.
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The winery is a relatively new industry and has certain research value. We have used theories of experiential marketing and experiential value in past studies of the tourism industry. However, in the literature in the past, wineries characteristic integration, cultural communication, and ways to achieve economic benefits of experience activities have been less explored. This study examines the successful winery cases and summarizes the models behind those successful experience activities. This study used a case study approach to analyze the secondary data collected through wineries characteristics, experience activities, and visitor participation at four wineries: Changyu Winery, Samuel Adams Winery, Macallan Winery, and Miguel Winery to present relevant results. The results of the study show that the wineries usually use the production methods of wine, the use of historical buildings, and the scenery of the wineries as components in their experiential activities. The wineries also need to deploy the resources required according to their circumstances, and on this basis, the design, operation, and other marketing of winery events are achieved through event planners’ planning, marketing, and promotion. Besides the regular wine-making activities, the winery offers entertainment and educational activities such as wine-tasting courses to meet the needs of visitors and make the winery experience model more effective in terms of entertainment and education, thus attracting more visitors to the wineries.KeywordsWineries FeaturesExperience ActivitiesVisitor Participation
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Reshoring can be theorized as a brand‐revitalizing process for fostering companies’ ability to create value in the home country. The question of how to maintain sustainable reshoring implementation strategies by developing favourable brand responses is an important but underexplored field. Given that reshoring brand meanings are socially constructed and causally inferenced by consumers, we advocate that a reshoring brand revitalization should begin by understanding what constitutes customers’ attributions to reshoring motives. We identify values‐driven, stakeholder‐driven and strategic‐driven attributions as determinants of the sense of the institutionalization process (brand authenticity, legitimacy and sustainability). These institutional logics comprise drivers that influence brand love and brand advocacy. We conduct an empirical study (n = 1043) in China. The findings indicate that institutionalized reshoring branding activity is significantly influenced by customers’ attributions to underlying reshoring decisions. Reshoring brands that achieve institutional recognition are more likely to generate brand love and advocacy. In addition, our study provides empirical evidence that nostalgia (1) strengthens the influences of stakeholder‐driven attributions on brand authenticity and sustainability, (2) inhibits the influence of values‐driven attributions on brand authenticity and (3) inhibits the influence of strategic‐driven attributions on brand authenticity, legitimacy and sustainability. Reshoring brand managers should consider these connections when designing their reshoring implementation strategies in the home country.
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Purpose This study explores reasons for and against secondhand luxury (SHL) fashion adoption among young consumers in an emerging nation, India. As a trend, SHL has witnessed tremendous growth in the past few years, but scholarly interest remains scant. Design/methodology/approach Drawing from an interpretivist paradigm, this study uses an exploratory qualitative approach with 26 semi-structured interviews with SHL buyers, analyzed using NVivo software. Findings The findings shed significant light on value drivers and find support for status value, uniqueness value, quality value and monetary value, while adding the role of emotional value in reasons for SHL adoption. The results reveal an interesting trait of Indian consumers: price, fashion and celebrity association outweigh sustainability concerns, where an attitude–behavior gap is observed. Also, the findings add depth to risk perceptions as a major reason against SHL adoption. Originality/value While most existing studies have only focused on the motivational drivers, this study offers in-depth insights into the growing SHL literature by drawing attention to the enablers and equally important inhibitors by applying the novel Behavioral Reasoning Theory. It also intends to enhance practitioner knowledge in understanding a culturally diverse market and developing strategies relevant to a new set of consumers. The study calls for SHL retailers to sensitize young consumers in India about the sustainability aspect of SHL consumption, which is currently less appreciated.
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Expert wine reviewers have a niche skill set, with a particular lexicon, that facilitates their evaluation of wines. Novice consumers may find wine reviews intimidating and confusing. In this paper, we use a dataset of nearly 130,000 reviews from expert reviewers at Wine Enthusiast to explore the lexical dimension of wine reviews and determine to what extent reviewers systematically use language differently across various wine price points. Trends reveal that the information needed to make informed wine purchases are provided through the language of wine reviews. Our analysis shows that wine selection does not require a technical understanding of the wine-specific vocabulary of wine experts. We present a review of the literature on wine reviews and form four hypotheses under the theoretical framework of Kahneman’s two systems of thought—suggesting the linguistic properties of wine reviews reveal the price of wine. We examine how the lexical categories; emotional and logical linguistic content; social; and somatic experiences used in wine reviews relate to price. We then suggest the applicability of this analysis to other commodity domains in future research.
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This Chapter reviews focus on the manager perspective on authenticity, particularly brand authenticity. It deals with different marketing aspects (including advertising, branding and communication of authenticity) in subfields such as consumer culture, luxury, and tourism. Chapter 4 also presents the results of a qualitative study including interviews with luxury brands’ managers on the concept of authenticity and its relevance to brand management.KeywordsBrand authenticityAuthenticity managementAdvertisingCommunicationTourism
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This chapter looks at authenticity from the perspective of consumers and focuses on consumption experiences and perceived authenticity. Consumer perceptions of authenticity have been found to be critical determinants of brand equity, attitude toward the brand, and purchase intentions. However, research on consumer perceived authenticity is still scant. This chapter presents the results of a study conducted on a sample of consumers, aimed at identifying what brands consumers define as authentic (vs. inauthentic) and what dimensions of the concept of authenticity consumers.KeywordsConsumer perceived authenticityConsumer cultureAdvertisingCommunicationTourismBrand authenticity
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This chapter identifies a number of conceptual and methodological issues characterizing marketing research on authenticity, including, the prevalence of a modernist conceptualization of authenticity; absence of a generalizable definition of authenticity; predominance of a taxonomic approach to the concept of authenticity; no consideration of the active and co-creative role of the consumer in constructing authenticity; dominance of institutional perspective on authenticity; research methodologies to study authenticity are mainly modernist; authenticity is studied in very specific contexts of analysis; lack of an operational definition of authenticity; scant research on the relationships among factors of authenticity. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize recent developments, highlight the state of the art, and to offer some critical observations of various understandings of the concept of authenticity in the marketing field, in order to identify conceptual or methodological gaps and limitations and directions for future research.KeywordsConceptual issuesMethodological issuesManagerial implicationsFuture research
Article
This research investigates both the downstream effect of perceived brand authenticity on consumers' actual, consequential choice and the important role of inferred brand dedication in the relationship between perceived brand authenticity, anticipated quality, and purchase intentions. We also investigate the interactive effect of two source‐related factors—intrinsic motivation and congruity—on consumers' brand authenticity perceptions. We present findings from three studies using different product categories (utilitarian/consumable: hand sanitizer; hedonic/consumable: chocolate; hedonic/non‐consumable: sunglasses). Study 1 shows that consumers use information regarding the intrinsic motivation of those behind the brand and congruity between the brand's actions and what it represents to consumers when forming brand authenticity perceptions and that intrinsic motivation and congruity interact to increase authenticity perceptions. We anticipate that consumers' positivity toward brands perceived as authentic will extend to actual choice through anticipated quality. Study 2 demonstrates that consumers choose authentic brands over inauthentic brands above what chance would dictate and anticipated quality can forecast this choice. Next, we extend our collective process knowledge by exploring an underlying reason why consumers anticipate that brands presented through marketing communications as authentic will have higher quality. We suggest that when managers present brands as authentic, consumers infer greater dedication of those behind the brand and inferred dedication influences anticipated product quality. Study 3 provides support and uncovers a serial mediation process, highlighting the importance of inferred dedication. Specifically, perceived brand authenticity increases consumers' brand dedication inferences, which in turn increases anticipated product quality, and ultimately purchase intentions.
Article
Purpose This study aims to crystallize the research landscape of corporate social responsibility (CSR) authenticity by systematically analyzing CSR scholarships published in peer-reviewed journals from 2007 to 2021. Design/methodology/approach Quantitative content analysis was used to systematically analyze 52 peer-reviewed articles on CSR authenticity. In particular, this study coded the conceptualizations and operationalizations of CSR authenticity, research contexts, applied theoretical frameworks and constructs associated with authenticity in the CSR scholarships. Findings This study’s analysis revealed that CSR authenticity is a multifaceted and multidimensional concept researched in various contexts. Yet, it still lacks clear and consistent conceptualization and theorization. Methodologically, qualitative and quantitative methods have equally contributed to the investigation of CSR authenticity. However, scale development and validation still need to improve. Research limitations/implications The sample of this research is limited by the searching method and language restriction. This research contributes to CSR scholarships by describing the growing landscape of CSR authenticity research, identifying key research gaps and offering suggestions for future research. Practical implications Practitioners can use the findings as references to develop more authentic CSR activities. Originality/value This study is an early attempt to examine the research on CSR authenticity, which has been inconclusive and disorganized, despite the rapid growth of publications in recent years.
Article
In the service industry, customers achieve life goals through experiences. In this study, we examine the effects of customers’ luxury service experiences on their life satisfaction. Using partial least squares-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM), multi-dimensional perceived values (i.e. hedonic, utilitarian, self-expressive) are examined as drivers of luxury hotel customers’ life satisfaction via enhanced perceived authenticity. This study found that perceived hedonic and self-expressive values influence the perceived authenticity of a luxury hotel brand among customers, which in turn drives life satisfaction. However, the direct effect of perceived utilitarian value on life satisfaction is only significant through brand authenticity. These results show that luxury service providers need to design services to maximize perceived authenticity to promote both brand performance and customer life satisfaction. As few studies have investigated the relationship between service experience and customers’ lives, in this paper we show how luxury service experiences can enhance customers’ quality of life.
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We propose music with accompanying liner notes as an unconventional device to capture and present marketing and consumer culture. Music allows researchers to craft a holistic experience out of a combination of elements that are present in the studied phenomena. It is a meaningful complement to other modes of alternative investigations and representations that have flourished in marketing and consumer research lately. Together with academic liner notes, i.e. the textual material that complements the music, the production of music has the potential to somewhat disrupt the linear legacy of how research results are typically presented and offers different opportunities for dissemination, since it speaks directly to the human ear. Our main contribution is a song that showcases these issues: ‘Alpen sind immer wunderschön’ performed by Postmödern talking sans frontièrs avéc fromage [the song can be found on Apple Music and Spotify searching for the title and/or the artist name.].
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This paper explores inauthenticity in the context of the Gems TV shopping channel using existential phenomenology. Objectively, subjectively and performatively Gems TV fails to convincingly stage a sense of authenticity. This is a televisual format featuring clearcut commercialism, obscure gemstones and opaque verification. Insincere screen performances are not only entertaining, but shoddiness and unpredictability of programming provides backstage glimpses that paradoxically stimulate fantasies of authenticity. Moments of intrapersonal and interpersonal connection arise around viewing. Accordingly, research into the neglected side of the authenticity-inauthenticity dialectic demonstrates that the latter may be a miasma of meanings as complex, contradictory and evocative as the former.
Article
Purpose Social media use has increased in recent years, and businesses are looking to capitalize on the plethora of marketing opportunities afforded by this digital shift by paying attention to user-generated content (UGC) posted on review websites. Leveraging UGC can help small businesses gain a competitive advantage over late-adopters. At the same time, there is evidence to suggest that small businesses do not have the time, resources or skill level to properly use social media to create a competitive advantage. This paper aims to explore how wine tourism businesses can analyze consumer feedback on online review websites to evaluate customer perceptions and expectations and generate more effective ways to improve customer satisfaction. Design/methodology/approach The qualitative method of thematic analysis was used to map out consumer reviews online to assess service satisfaction and dissatisfaction. A total of 848 reviews were gathered and qualitatively analyzed from two online review websites (TripAdvisor.com and Yelp.com) using open and axial coding and thematic analysis. Findings The results show that wine consumers are interested in the hedonic aspects of their experience, are most often attracted to wineries as a special outing and focus on factors such as scenery and atmosphere, service quality and products in their reviews. Hence, service and sales personnel have a key opportunity to capitalize on generating better service experiences through social media analysis. Originality/value The present study fills a gap by providing a more in-depth, qualitative exploration of the wine consumers’ psychology and experience, including factors such as atmosphere and special occasions. Furthermore, this study uses interpretive, manual coding to pick up on nuanced themes that are often missed by using automated qualitative analysis software or by looking at frequency counts in isolation.
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With the crisis of the pandemic, many industries are affected and the beauty and personal care product sector is no exception. Even during this situation, many companies continue communicating about their involvement in CSR activities. Therefore, this study aims to investigate CSR communication and CSR-CA beliefs on various effects including CSR skepticism, brand authenticity, and word-of-mouth intention from younger generations regarding the message from beauty and personal care product companies. Samples of 250 were collected and examined all hypothesized relationships using structural equation modeling. It was found that CSR communication and CSR-CA beliefs have significant direct effects on CSR skepticism and brand authenticity. As for the mediating role, brand authenticity was found to have an indirect effect on the relationship between CSR communication and word-of-mouth intention, whereas the mediating role of CSR skepticism was not found.
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Retro brands are relaunched historical brands with updated features. The authors conduct a "netnographic" analysis of two prominent retro brands, the Volkswagen New Beetle and Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace, that reveals the importance of Allegory (brand story), Aura (brand essence), Arcadia (idealized community), and Antinomy (brand paradox). Retro brand meanings are predicated on a Utopian communal element and an enlivening paradoxical essence. Retro brand management involves an uneasy, cocreative, and occasionally clamorous alliance between producers and consumers.
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Although consumer demand for authentic market offerings has often been men-tioned in consumer research, the meaning of the term "authentic" has not been sufficiently specified. Thus, some important differences among authentic market offerings have not been recognized or examined. This article uses Peirce's semiotic framework to distinguish between two kinds of authenticity—indexical and iconic. We identify the cues that lead to the assessment of each kind, and, based on data collected at two tourist attractions, we show that these cues can have a different influence on the benefits of consuming authenticity. Our results also contribute to an understanding of the negotiation of reality and fantasy as a part of consumption. C onsumer demand for authenticity has existed for hun-dreds of years. For example, from the ninth to the elev-enth centuries, interest in authentic religious relics in Europe helped to generate significant retail and tourism revenues (Phillips 1997). And, during the fifteenth and sixteenth cen-turies, diversity in consumer standards for authenticity in China created a flourishing market for luxury goods (Clunas 1992). Demand for authenticity persists today and is reflected in the purchase of a wide variety of market offerings, in-cluding travel souvenirs (Harkin 1995), ethnic food (Lu and Fine 1995), tickets to historical reconstructions (Handler and Gable 1997), and original art (Bentor 1993)—not to mention more conventional consumer goods and services such as ath-letic shoes and brokerage advice (Goldman and Papson 1996). In fact, Brown (2001) argues that one of modern marketing's central themes is the tension between authenticity and in-authenticity. During the last century, this tension has been intensified by technological advances, which have facilitated the effective simulation of authenticity (Benjamin 1969; Halliday 2001; Orvell 1989). But, as an Adweek columnist, and the JCR editor, associate editor, and reviewers for helpful comments on previous drafts. Special thanks to the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the Sherlock Holmes Museum for gen-erously allowing access to their visitors.
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Brands are today under attack by an emerging countercultural movement. This study builds a dialectical theory of consumer culture and branding that explains the rise of this movement and its potential effects. Results of an interpretive study challenge existing theories of consumer resistance. To develop an alternative model, I first trace the rise of the modern cultural engineering paradigm of branding, premised upon a consumer culture that granted marketers cultural authority. Intrinsic contradictions erased its efficacy. Next I describe the current postmodern consumer culture, which is premised upon the pursuit of personal sovereignty through brands. I detail five postmodern branding techniques that are premised upon the principle that brands are authentic cultural resources. Postmodern branding is now giving rise to new contradictions that have inflamed the antibranding sentiment sweeping Western countries. I detail these contradictions and project that they will give rise to a new post-postmodern branding paradigm premised upon brands as citizen-artists. Copyright 2002 by the University of Chicago.
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This study examines one of the most debated questions in the sociology of culture: Does Pierre Bourdieu's theory relating levels of cultural capital to consumption patterns apply to the contemporary United States? First, I summarize the innovative characteristics of Bourdieu's theory in relation to the Warnerian tradition of social class research. Next, I critique American appropriations of Bourdieu's theory of tastes and suggest that, in the contemporary United States, the theory should be reformulated to focus on consumption practices rather than consumption objects and on mass rather than high culture. Using this reformulation, I conduct an interpretive empirical study to investigate whether differences in cultural capital resources structure patterns of taste in a mideastern American county. Analyzing a series of ethnographic interviews, I describe six dimensions of taste that distinguish informants with high versus low cultural capital resources: material versus formal aesthetics, referential versus critical interpretations, materialism versus idealism, local versus cosmopolitan tastes, communal versus individualist forms of consumer subjectivity, and autotelic Versus self-actualizing leisure. These findings suggest that consumption continues to serve as a potent site for the reproduction of social class.
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- This paper describes the process of inducting theory using case studies from specifying the research questions to reaching closure. Some features of the process, such as problem definition and construct validation, are similar to hypothesis-testing research. Others, such as within-case analysis and replication logic, are unique to the inductive, case-oriented process. Overall, the process described here is highly iterative and tightly linked to data. This research approach is especially appropriate in new topic areas. The resultant theory is often novel, testable, and empirically valid. Finally, framebreaking insights, the tests of good theory (e.g., parsimony, logical coherence), and convincing grounding in the evidence are the key criteria for evaluating this type of research.
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Although consumer demand for authentic market offerings has often been mentioned in consumer research, the meaning of the term "authentic" has not been sufficiently specified. Thus, some important differences among authentic market offerings have not been recognized or examined. This article uses Peirce's semiotic framework to distinguish between two kinds of authenticity - indexical and iconic. We identify the cues that lead to the assessment of each kind, and, based on data collected at two tourist attractions, we show that these cues can have a different influence on the benefits of consuming authenticity. Our results also contribute to an understanding of the negotiation of reality and fantasy as a part of consumption.
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The author employs critical ethnographic methods to examine empirically marketers' processes of producing cultural meanings at a western stock show and rodeo. Western cultural meanings and values of freedom, naturalism, competition, and family values are produced by marketers in attracting a nonranch audience; juxtaposing business, education, and entertainment; making ample references to historical tradition; and using business activity as the basis for claims of authenticity. Marketing implications center on tapping into rich sources of cultural meaning by (1) attending to the cultural dimensions of economic activity, (2) taking industry as the unit of analysis through an examination of representations of production in market discourses and practices, (3) expanding history from a research method to a source of market meaning, and (4) considering the marketplace as a lived tradition.
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This paper describes the process of inducting theory using case studies-from specifying the research questions to reaching closure. Some features of the process, such as problem definition and construct validation, are similar to hypothesis-testing research. Others, such as within-case analysis and replication logic, are unique to the inductive, case-oriented process. Overall, the process described here is highly iterative and tightly linked to data. This research approach is especially appropriate in new topic areas. The resultant theory is often novel, testable, and empirically valid. Finally, framebreaking insights, the tests of good theory (e.g., parsimony, logical coherence), and convincing grounding in the evidence are the key criteria for evaluating this type of research.
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Forden S. The House of Gucci: a sensational story of murder, madness, glamour, and greed. New York' Perennial Currents; 2001.
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Guy KM. When Champagne became French: wine and the making of a national identity. Baltimore' John Hopkins University Press; 2002.