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An analysis of 30 craniological characters of Eurasian badgers (Meles spp.) revealed different levels of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) and geographic variation in the three different species. SSD is displayed mostly in the general size of the skull (condylobasal length, zygomatic width, width of rostrum, and cranial height) and mandible (height of the vertical mandibular ramus, total length of the mandible, and length between the angular process and infradentale), and in some dental characters (length of the upper molar M¹). The most stable size dimorphism is manifested in the size of the canines, which is pronounced in all studied samples. SSD is not apparent in the length of the auditory bulla, the postorbital width, the minimum palatal width, the length of the lower molar M2, and the talonid length of the lower carnassial tooth M1.
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... 4 . (Abramov & Puzachenko, 2005;Davis et al., 2012;Efremova et al., 2011;International Council for Archaeozoology & Ruscillo, 2006;López-Martín et al., 2006;Mayer & Brisbin, 1988;Prummel & Frisch, 1986;Ruscillo, 2015;Sykes & Symmons, 2007) . ...
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