Article

Fatigue design of welded aluminum rectangular hollow section joints

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Structural Engineering, Rich. Birkelandsvei 1a, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway
Engineering Failure Analysis (Impact Factor: 1.03). 04/1999; 6(2):113-130. DOI: 10.1016/S1350-6307(98)00025-9

ABSTRACT

Fatigue design methods for welded aluminum joints are reviewed, including various approaches to fatigue life estimation currently adopted in design codes across a range of industrial applications. The applicability of these established methodologies to the fatigue design of automotive space frame structures is critically assessed. The hot spot stress method is identified as the most promising in terms of providing a coherent and comprehensive approach to design. Particular problems related to implementation are considered such as failure sites and determination of appropriate stress concentration factors from physical models, finite element calculations or parametric equations. Preliminary results from finite element stress analyses and fatigue tests are also presented for rectangular hollow sections welded in a T-joint configuration. Recommendations are made for a design methodology for welded rectangular hollow-section joints in aluminum space frames, including use of a single hot spot S–N curve.

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    • "It should be noted that the aforementioned investigations focused on carbon steel tubular joints rather than stainless steel tubular joints. Macdonald and Haagensen [6] studied the fatigue behavior of welded aluminum RHS T-joints based on both fatigue tests and finite element analysis. Appropriate SCFs were determined from strain gauge measurements in the experimental investigation and the validated finite element modeling. "
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes experimental and numerical investigations on stress concentration factors (SCFs) of cold-formed stainless steel square and rectangular hollow section (SHS and RHS) tubular X-joints. Both high strength stainless steel (duplex and high strength austenitic) and normal strength stainless steel (AISI 304) specimens were investigated. The SCFs were experimentally determined under static loading by measuring the strains at typical hot spot locations using strip strain gauges. The corresponding finite element analysis was performed to simulate the non-uniform stress distribution along the brace and chord intersection region. Good agreement between the experimental and finite element analysis results was achieved. Therefore, an extensive parametric study was then carried out by using the verified finite element model to evaluate the effects of the SCFs of cold-formed stainless steel tubular X-joints. The SCFs at the hot spot locations obtained from the experimental investigation and parametric study were compared with those calculated using the design formulae given in the CIDECT for carbon steel tubular X-joints. It is shown from the comparison that the design rules for the SCFs specified in the CIDECT are generally quite unconservative for cold-formed stainless steel tubular X-joints. In this study, a unified design equation for the SCFs of cold-formed stainless steel tubular X-joints is proposed. The proposed design equation was based on the CIDECT design equation for carbon steel tubular X-joints. It is shown that the SCFs calculated from the proposed unified design equation are generally in agreement with the values predicted from finite element analysis.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · Journal of Constructional Steel Research
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    • "It should be noted that the aforementioned investigations focused on carbon steel tubular joints rather than stainless steel tubular joints. Macdonald and Haagensen [6] studied the fatigue behavior of welded aluminum RHS T-joints based on both fatigue tests and finite element analysis. Appropriate SCFs were determined from strain gauge measurements in the experimental investigation and the validated finite element modeling. "

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Constructional Steel Research
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    • "Recently, Mashiri et al. (2002) applied the hot spot stress method for fatigue design for thin walled welded joints, which is not included in the fatigue design rule of the current Canadian Standard. Macdonald and Haagensen (1999) used hot spot stress analysis for fatigue design of welded rectangular hollow section joints and identified the hot spot stress analysis for fatigue design as one of the most promising method in terms of providing a coherent and comprehensive approach to fatigue design. The recommendation on the use of the hot spot stress analysis for fatigue design is discussed in their report. "
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    ABSTRACT: The suspension bridge has more flexibility and repetitive vehicles produce stress cycles in members. Then fatigue of the member is accumulated with the daily traffic loadings. In order to evaluate the working condition of the Tsing Ma Bridge, the online monitoring health system has been installed in long suspension bridge. The location of the strain sensor is not exactly at the critical member locations. The hot spot stress analysis for critical members is necessary for accurate fatigue evaluation of the bridge. The global finite element analysis of the Tsing Ma Bridge under traffic loading is performed to determine the critical fatigue member locations. A detailed local finite element analysis for the welded connections is performed to determine the hot spot stress of critical fatigue location. As a case for study, the calculated stress concentration factor is combined with the nominal representative stress block cycle to obtain the representative hot spot stress range cycle block under traffic loading from online health monitoring system. The comparison result shows that the nominal stress approach cannot consider the most critical stress of the fatigue damage location and the hot spot stress approach is more appropriate for fatigue evaluation.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2007 · Key Engineering Materials
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