Article

Competitive potential of tourism in destinations

Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain
Annals of Tourism Research (Impact Factor: 3.26). 07/2003; 30(3):720-740. DOI: 10.1016/S0160-7383(03)00047-1

ABSTRACT

The study of tourist demand for a destination often includes an analysis of elements of general nature. This complicates assessing whether a territory will succeed in a type of tourism. To perform this task, it is necessary to consider the resources of the destination. It has been thought that the resource-based approach can offer a suitable theoretical framework for investigation of the subject. This paper explains the main concepts needed to develop a procedure for evaluating the competitive potential of a tourism type in a destination. To illustrate, it further discusses the application of this concept to deep-sea sports fishing tourism in Gran Canaria, Spain.RésuméLe potentiel compétitif du tourisme aux destinations. L’étude de la demande touristique pour une destination comprend souvent une analyse d’éléments de nature générale. Cela complique l’évaluation des possibilités de réussite d’un certain genre de tourisme. Pour réaliser une évaluation, il faut considérer les ressources de la destination. On est parti de l’hypothèse qu’une approche basée sur les ressources peut offrir un cadre théorique convenable pour une étude du sujet. Le présent article explique les principaux concepts qui sont essentiels pour développer une procédure pour évaluer le potentiel compétitif d’un genre de tourisme à une destination. Pour illustrer la procédure, l’article discute de l’application de ce concept au tourisme basé sur le sport de la pêche hauturière à la Grande Canarie.

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    • "These indicators were generated during workshops with tourism industry stakeholders in Australia and Korea and were subsequently categorised into six subgroups : ( 1 ) endowed resources , ( 2 ) support - ing factors , ( 3 ) destination management , ( 4 ) situational condition , ( 5 ) demand factors and ( 6 ) market perfor - mance indicators . Yet the competitiveness models proposed by Crouch and Ritchie ( 1999 ) , Enright and Newton ( 2004 , 2005 ) , Gonzalez and Falcon ( 2003 ) and Dwyer and Kim ( 2003 ) are more like systems of definitions than cause - and - effect relationships . The authors refrain from expressing whether their systems of indicators are : ( 1 ) meant to be reflective and therefore intended to operationalise destination com - petitiveness or ( 2 ) proposed as formative indicators preceding competitiveness in an either a definitional or causal sense . "
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