Is Application of an Internal Anterior Pelvic Fixator Anatomically Feasible?

ArticleinClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 470(8):2111-5 · March 2012with10 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.77 · DOI: 10.1007/s11999-012-2287-6 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Spinal hardware has been adapted for fixation in the setting of anterior pelvic injury. This anterior subcutaneous pelvic fixator consists of pedicle screws placed in the supraacetabular region connected by a contoured connecting rod placed subcutaneously and above the abdominal muscle fascia.
    We examined the placement of the components for anterior subcutaneous pelvic fixator relative to key vascular, urologic, bony, and surface structures.
    We measured the CT scans of 13 patients after placement of the pelvic fixator to determine the shortest distances between the fixator components and important anatomic structures: the femoral vascular bundle, the urinary bladder, the cranial margin of the hip, the screw insertion point on the bony pelvis, the relationship between the pedicle screw and the corridor of bone in which it resided, and the position relative to the skin.
    The average distance from the vascular bundle to the pedicle screw was 4.1 cm and 2.2 cm to the connecting rod. The average distance from the connecting rod to the anterior edge of the bladder was 2.6 cm. The average distance from the screw insertion point to the hip was 2.4 cm; none penetrated the hip. The average screw was in bone for 5.9 cm. The pedicle screws were on average 2.1 cm under the skin. The average distance from the anterior skin to the connecting rod was 2.7 cm.
    Components of this anterior pelvic fixator are close to important anatomic structures. Careful adherence to the surgical technique should minimize potential risk.
    Level IV, retrospective study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.