Conference Paper

Measuring user reaction to reduce Internet anxiety

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Abstract

The Internet has recently emerged with new kind of services, applications and countless contents. User reaction plays essential role in interacting with the Internet. The theoretical concepts on feelings are extracted from psychology, phenomenology and computer science. It is understood that feelings are subjective experience of users aroused from different emotions. As feelings changes based on time, circumstance, people and environment, it is extremely difficult to assess feelings objectively. User's interaction on the Internet is based on contents (text, audio and video materials) and context (past experience, surroundings, circumstances, environment, background, or settings). Thus, the potential of understanding feelings and its measure is very important. In this paper, a systematic measure of feelcalc module is introduced to measure user's reaction in order to reduce human anxiety on the Internet.

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... There is the enormous problem at stake academically: how can we optimize and strengthen the ML and data-driven platform for the social web that understands human emotions and feelings? To tackle this challenging problem, we have been developing the FeelCalc module [2,3] over several years. ...
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Automatic Detection of and Response to Student Emotion
  • Affective
Affective Tutors: Automatic Detection of and Response to Student Emotion. In R. Nkambou, J. Bourdeau & R. Mizoguchi (Eds.), Advances in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (Vol., 308, pp. 207-227): Springer Berline/Heidelberg.