Article

Hydrocolloid dressings for healing diabetic foot ulcers

Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, UK. .
Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) (Impact Factor: 6.03). 02/2012; 2(2):CD009099. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009099.pub2
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Diabetes, a condition which leads to high blood glucose concentrations, is a common condition with around 2.8 million people affected in the UK (approximately 4.3% of the population). Dressings are commonly used to treat foot ulcers in people with diabetes. There are many types of dressings that can be used, which also vary considerably in cost.This review (four studies involving a total of 511 participants) identified no research evidence to suggest that any type of hydrocolloid wound dressing is more effective in healing diabetic foot ulcers than other types of dressing.

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    • "Moura et al. / Acta Biomaterialia 9 (2013) 7093–7114 7097 one week [74]. However, there are contradictory studies on whether hydrocolloid-type wound dressings can be used in diabetic foot wounds in the case of superficial wounds, if there are no signs of infection, or if few or moderate wound exudates are present [78]. (2) Hydrogels—these systems are mostly used to maintain highly moist wound environments and are comprised of single or mixed hydrated polymers (i.e. in the form of a gel) presenting at least 20% of their weight in retained water [73] [79]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a chronic, non-healing complication of diabetes that leads to high hospital costs and, in extreme cases, to amputation. Diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, abnormal cellular and cytokine/chemokine activity are among the main factors that initiate impaired diabetic wound repair. DFUs represent a current and important challenge in the development of novel and efficient wound dressings. In general, an ideal wound dressing should be able to provide a moist wound environment, to protect from secondary infections, to remove wound exudate and to promote tissue regeneration. However, no existing dressing fulfills all the requirements associated to DFU treatment and the choice of the correct dressing depends on the wound type and stage, injury extension, patient condition and involved tissues. Presently, there are different types of commercially available wound dressings that can be used for DFU treatment which differ on their application modes, materials, shape and on the methods employed for production. Dressing materials can include natural, modified and synthetic polymers, as well as their mixtures or combinations, processed in the form of films, foams, hydrocolloids and hydrogels. Moreover, wound dressings may be employed as medicated systems, through the delivery of healing enhancers and therapeutic substances (drugs, growth factors, peptides, stem cells and/or other bioactive substances). This work reviews the state-of-the-art and the most recent advances on the development of wound dressings for DFU treatment. Special emphasis is given to systems employing new polymeric biomaterials, to the latest and innovative therapeutic strategies and delivery approaches.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · Acta biomaterialia
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    • "However, the application of hydrocolloid dressings in strongly infected wounds has been questioned due to the possible hypoxic and excessively moist environment that could potentiate autolysis of necrotic tissue and therefore increase the risk of infection at the wound site [77] [78]. Hydrocolloids are usually applied to granulating and epithelializing wounds and therefore they may be also used for necrotic wounds in order to promote wound debridement [76]. In average, these materials can be maintained on DFUs for more than Other Nicotine db/db diabetic mice Accelerated healing and increased wound angiogenesis Jacobi et al, 2002 [279] Simvastatin db/db diabetic mice Increased VEGF mRNA and protein expression. "
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a chronic, non-healing complication of diabetes that lead to high hospital costs and, in extreme cases, to amputation. Diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, abnormal cellular and cytokine/chemokine activity are among the main factors that hinder diabetic wound repair. DFUs represent a current and important challenge in the development of novel and efficient wound dressings. In general, an ideal wound dressing should provide a moist wound environment, offer protection from secondary infections, remove wound exudate and promote tissue regeneration. However, no existing dressing fulfills all the requirements associated with DFU treatment and the choice of the correct dressing depends on the wound type and stage, injury extension, patient condition and the tissues involved. Currently, there are different types of commercially available wound dressings that can be used for DFU treatment which differ on their application modes, materials, shape and on the methods employed for production. Dressing materials can include natural, modified and synthetic polymers, as well as their mixtures or combinations, processed in the form of films, foams, hydrocolloids and hydrogels. Moreover, wound dressings may be employed as medicated systems, through the delivery of healing enhancers and therapeutic substances (drugs, growth factors, peptides, stem cells and/or other bioactive substances). This work reviews the state of the art and the most recent advances in the development of wound dressings for DFU treatment. Special emphasis is given to systems employing new polymeric biomaterials, and to the latest and innovative therapeutic strategies and delivery approaches
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · Acta Biomaterialia
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    ABSTRACT: Skin is the largest organ in human body. It guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments, and internal organs. The skin faces the environment, and it is the first line to defend against the assaults of external physical, chemical, and micro-organic factors. The other functions of skin include systemic metabolism, temperature regulation, sensation, and production of vitamin D and folate. Skin injury usually leads to barrier function damage. Extensive skin injury would induce a series of problems such as water-electrolyte disorder, hypoproteinemia, and severe infection. Thus it is important to choose a suitable wound dressing when the skin is severely injured. The characteristics of wound dressings have undergone repeated and noticeable changes over the last several years. Compared with that of the traditional dressing, the ability of new dressings is improved obviously in the properties of wound protection, infection prevention, and wound healing promotion. This article deals with an overview on the characteristics of different wound dressings.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · Zhonghua shao shang za zhi = Zhonghua shaoshang zazhi = Chinese journal of burns
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