Article

Development of an internet-based Cohort of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (CCFA Partners®): Methodology and initial results

Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. .
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (Impact Factor: 4.46). 12/2011; 18(11):2099-106. DOI: 10.1002/ibd.22895
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The widespread use of the Internet allows for unique research opportunities. We aimed to develop and follow an Internet-based cohort (e-cohort) of patients with self-reported inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) over time.
We established an e-cohort of adults with IBD (CCFA Partners) by recruiting through Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) email rosters, CCFA Website promotion, social media, and other publicity mechanisms. The baseline survey included modules on disease course and activity, diet and exercise, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Baseline characteristics of the cohort are summarized using descriptive statistics.
A total of 7819 adults with IBD joined CCFA Partners through August, 2011. The median age was 42 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30-54), 5074 (72.3%) were female. A total of 4933 (63.1%) had Crohn's disease (CD), 2675 (34.2%) had ulcerative colitis (UC), and 211 (2.7%) had IBD unspecified. For CD, the mean short CD Activity Index (CDAI) was 151.9 (standard deviation [SD] 106.4), with 2274 (59.4%) in remission. For UC, the mean simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI) was 3.6 (SD 2.8), with 937 (42.9%) in remission. The mean short IBD questionnaire (SIBDQ) score was 48.7 (SD 11.8). SIBDQ was inversely correlated with disease activity (P < 0.01). The mean Morisky medication adherence score (MMAS) was 5.7 (SD 2.0). MMAS scores were inversely correlated with disease activity (P < 0.01).
CCFA Partners is a novel e-cohort. Enrollment is ongoing, with surveys twice yearly. CCFA Partners represents a unique resource to study PROs and changes in disease management over time. (Inflamm Bowel Dis 2012;).

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