Article

Survival rates of adult European grebes (Podicipedidae)

Ardea -Wageningen- (Impact Factor: 0.65). 08/2009; 97(3):313-321.

ABSTRACT

Ring recoveries of dead individuals from all over Europe and covering a period of 57 years were collected to study survival of Great Crested Podiceps cristatus (n = 433), Black-necked P. nigricollis (n = 95) and Little Grebes Tachybaptus ruficollis (n = 295). Survival rates of adult birds were estimated by fitting simple mark-recapture models via maximum-likelihood. Realizing that the samples were extremely heterogeneous and possibly biased, it was further investigated how the survival data conformed to information from literature on fledging success, age at first breeding, and long-term population trends. In the Great Crested Grebe, ring recoveries were biased towards young birds, as indicated by a marked, untypical increase in apparent survival after the age of 3 years. Also, the whole-sample estimate of 0.66 was too low to match the other demographic parameters. The survival rate of 0.75 (95% CI 0.69-0.80) estimated for birds of 4 years and older conformed well with the breeding performance established for Great Crested Grebes and is thus considered as a realistic estimate for adult birds. The survival rate estimate of 0.63 (95% CI 0.55-0.70) for the Black-necked Grebe seemed a slight underestimate given estimates for the other demographic parameters. Apart from a possible, albeit undetected, sample bias towards younger birds, some influence of ring loss cannot be excluded, because in contrast to the other two species, the Black-necked Grebe sample contained a high proportion of aluminium rings. The survival rate of Little Grebe was estimated at 0.60 (95% CI: 0.55-0.64), which corresponded well with other demographic data.

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    • "Data on the adult survival of bird species came from the Dutch Centre for Avian Migration and Demography (Coehoorn et al. 2011), part of the NIOO (The Dutch Institute for Ecology). Additional data on missing values on the adult survival has been gathered from the database from The British Trust for Ornithology accessible via their website (The British Trust for Ornithology 1933) and from other literature (Flegg and Glue 1973; Brooke and Davies 1987; Bensch 1996; Payevsky and Shapoval 2000; Servello 2000; Forero et al. 2001; Michalek and Winkler 2001; Hakkarainen et al. 2002; Kosenko and Kaygorodova 2003; Cuervo 2005; Wiebe 2006; Geiser et al. 2008; Abt and Konter 2009; Eraud et al. 2009; Payevsky 2009; Schaub et al. 2011). "
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    • "Data on the adult survival of bird species came from the Dutch Centre for Avian Migration and Demography (Coehoorn et al. 2011), part of the NIOO (The Dutch Institute for Ecology). Additional data on missing values on the adult survival has been gathered from the database from The British Trust for Ornithology accessible via their website (The British Trust for Ornithology 1933) and from other literature (Flegg and Glue 1973; Brooke and Davies 1987; Bensch 1996; Payevsky and Shapoval 2000; Servello 2000; Forero et al. 2001; Michalek and Winkler 2001; Hakkarainen et al. 2002; Kosenko and Kaygorodova 2003; Cuervo 2005; Wiebe 2006; Geiser et al. 2008; Abt and Konter 2009; Eraud et al. 2009; Payevsky 2009; Schaub et al. 2011). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Life-history traits and their underlying interactions have been the center of many studies. Here it is investigated how a recent created value to quantify the trait reproduction, The Relative Reproductive Investment (RRI), relates to various other traits. The RRI is constructed by multiplying average clutch size (ĉ), the number of clutches per season (Nc) and egg mass (megg), divided by the female body mass (mfemale): RRI = (ĉ*Nc*megg)/mfemale. Together with a large dataset containing data on migration, nest location, care of offspring and adult survival of 186 bird species it will be investigated how the RRI trade-offs to other life-history traits and if this is in line with literature found and previous performed research. There exists a negative correlation between the RRI and adult survival, as was expected. For migratory behavior there was no correlation found with the RRI. Different nest locations leads to a significant difference in clutch size, which is part of the RRI, but did not significantly affect the RRI value. Birds with a different type of offspring significantly differed in trait values of which the RRI is constructed. However, these differences ruled each other out, leading to altricial and precocial birds which did not significantly differed in their RRI. Significant difference between altricials and precocials were found in clutch size and egg mass, both part of the RRI. Beside adult survival, only the care of offspring (determined by parental care by one or both parents and fledging period), led to a significant difference in the RRI. More parental care was found in combination with a lower RRI. This is probably as a lower RRI can be made up for by displaying more care for the offspring, but also because higher parental care leads to higher predation risks. A lower RRI leading to less offspring, lowers care for the offspring and a lowers predation rate, on offspring and parents. It is not inconceivable that this strategy per ratio leads to more reared offspring and a higher fitness under predation.
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    Preview · Article · Feb 2013 · Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences